OK, Go!

28 May

I’ve been dallying, because I am intimidated by the personal statement.  But I need to just get something down, and stop all the internet scouring, as it’s just taking time.  I’m not sure it’s all that helpful.  So in the interest of making $hit happen, here goes try #1:

UNC AuD app checklist

Format:

intro–talk about shopping w/dad and how that inspires my interest in the career

–in 1st paragraph tie in my internal personality traits that work well with audiology

Body–very briefly mention pre-vet, but generate substantial list of vet traits that relate directly to audiology

3rd paragraph/conclusion(?)–further show it’s AuD I want (not vet) by talking about hearing screenings, classes, media that inspires/educates me and how it directly relates to the specific type & population I want to work with.

Audiogram-Familiar-Sounds

OK, quick and dirty for content purposes–can be fleshed out and corrected later.  The 1st Draft isn’t SUPPOSED to be perfect (that was a note to myself)!

Intro:

As a child it was always special bonding time for my father and I to go grocery shopping.  It was a time-consuming affair, but we liked to be together.  The shopping itself, was tedious and boring, but I love my dad and liked to laugh with him.  One damper on the process was checking out.  My dad could not hear his total.  It made me feel awkward and I did not like how people in line behind us became impatient.  Those people should see my dad as I did–funny, compassionate, warm, loyal, hard-working.  Instead they saw him as an impediment to leaving the store–a burden, an annoyance.  I hated to see the cashier become flustered or impatient.  Why couldn’t everyone realize my dad had the hearing loss because he is a hero?  He got this embarrassing condition fighting for our country in Vietnam.  But I felt ashamed, because I also felt annoyed and embarrassed when the check out process was slowed by my father’s disability.

It made me ashamed, because I consider myself a compassionate person.  That is the whole reason I leaned toward being a veterinarian for so long–I wanted to help the helpless.

Today, I am inspired to help people like my dad function like the heros they are.  I want to not only help hearing aids be available to patients, but make the human side, the rehabilitation, instruction for use, and communication skills to be available.

[note to self:  stop trying to make it sound perfect and be perfectly organized, and just think basic content–you can fix this stuff later, you’re getting stuck!]

Traits that I embody are organizational skills, dedication, and determination.  They are perfect for the field of audiology.  Organization is necessary to assess the patient and figure out appropriate diagnostic procedures by looking at every aspect of the problem, the case history, and the anatomy.  Dedication comes in handy when you commit to a patient’s progress and quality of life over time.  Audiologists are not finished after the diagnostic and fitting portions.  They have to follow through and make certain that the person they are working with are functional, confident, and meeting their own goals.  Determination is a skill an audiologist needs to work with a variety of people, with differing needs.  Audiologists have to tailor care to the deficits of each person, and determination to seek the correct diagnosis, find outside the box solutions and, persist in trying until it’s right is pertinent.

Because I have those traits, feeling embarrassed to be seen with my struggling father made me ashamed.  I could have such compassion, and I was letting my own emotions get in the way of that when it came to one of the most important people in my life.  It was my compassion that had led me into being a pre-vet student.  And though that career did not work out for me, the skills I gained while chasing is translate directly and nicely to audiology.

Nonverbal communication skills, essential for ascertaining animal temperaments with the twin goals in mine of keeping human and animal uninjured, and efficiently accomplishing the task at hand is directly related to audiology.  When hearing loss makes verbal communication difficult, reading postural, ocular, and other signs becomes helpful.

The detail-oriented nature that veterinary practice demands, is also necessary for audiology.  Looking at the entire patient, running the best diagnostic tests, following through with best amplification, and making sure the patient is receiving benefit from your work, is a lot of small details.  It requires meticulousness and thoroughness.

[generate a bigger list of traits used for both vet & AuD]

The desire to work in audiology was sparked by my intent to help people like my dad.  The necessary skills were honed in a different health field.  Once I got my foot in the door to the speech and hearing sciences, the knowledge of the profession followed.  Learning about anatomy and physiology gave me a good foundation for normal.  The speech and hearing sciences tied the chemistry and physics I had already taken together with the auditory and communication systems.  Learning about pathologies and amplification was interesting.  I really enjoyed the rehabilitation tactics and audiometric evaluations.  And I was able to practice them through performing hearing screenings through my school.  I liked putting the theories I had learned in the classroom to practical use on real people.

These specific examples of things we did, showed me I would like to work with the spectrum of ages in this specific field of audiology.  And of course, remembering my dad, I will emphasize aural rehabilitation and follow up with each of my future patients.

health fair 2014

All right, that wasn’t so bad.  I’ll publish this then generate some lists to make it better!

Enhanced by Zemanta
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: