My First Week of Work

22 Sep

I mean, not work exactly, but my first non-veterinary/animal-related and non-school job.

It was strange.

duck crossingThe pace is substantially slower.  Like, I could do the whole thing in a very maximum of 3 hours (really getting into details) yet there was 6 of us scheduled and I was there for 8 hours.

It’s a lot of wandering around wondering what else there is to do.  Everyone is in that boat, and we’re on top of each other.  But mostly everyone is good natured about it.  They all know the story.  And I guess better this way then short-staffed like I’m used to.  I’m not used to it, but it’s WAAAAAAY lower stress.

Everyone was nice to me right off too.  They were nicer to me, and included me more on my first day, than some vet hospitals ever had (Emergency, Seattle, Cat’s Meow I’m talking to you).  Which is sad for those past jobs–shame on you.  The gal showing me the ropes said she wished we could normally work together (I’m a good worker, and a nice person if you give me half a chance).  That was something nice.  It’s not like I care what people think about me, and normally the people that don’t like me–well I don’t tend to like them either.  So it’s not that I fret or dwell on the opinion of sheep or $hit-heads as the case may be.  But constant negativity coming towards you eventually drags you down a little.  And that had been happening.  This automatically feels a lot better!

The gal working with me was like, “there’s no way you did a good job–that was too fast.” when we were squeegeeing the milking cowsfloors dry.  But what they didn’t know is I know my way around a squeegee, having cleaned dog runs, cow stanchions, and hogs my entire working life.  So I pretty much immediately became the squeegee super-star of the group 😀

When I showed up on my 2nd day, nobody I knew was working.  So I pretty much had to figure it out and go it alone–I guess 4 hours of training was all I got.  So that was weird, because I still didn’t know a lot of anything.  I wasn’t sure where all the supplies were, what times we were allowed to do certain things, or even what jobs needed to be done.  But I’m used to that story–vets never have time to appropriately train anybody so I’m used to being thrown in the deep end.

My supervisor’s last day was my 2nd day of work.  Which is also a weird way to start a job.  And everyone was so nice to him and made him feel important and special.  I decided on someone’s last day, it’s not only a nice thing, but an obligatory etiquette to, at the very, very least have a card for them.  Which Cat’s Meow didn’t for me.  Nor did Aurora or emergency.  And Noah’s Ark didn’t, but my employers gave me a nice necklace and everyone (important) seemed legit sad to see me go.  And that’s totally on those past jobs, and their bad karma–it has nothing to do with my that they acted so $hitty.  It was nice to see these current coworkers get a card and sign, long messages in it, bake a cake, and invite him out for drinks after work.  All on their own accord.  It wasn’t mandatory or reminded–they just stepped up and did the right thing.  They invited me along too, and it would have been a great bonding opportunity, but there was ZERO chance I could have said no to drinking, so unfortunately I had to decline the invitation.  I’m not a night person anyway so I would have been yawning into my soda.

Here’s my 6th day (2nd week) of work:

-supervisor said I don’t have to do all the work in the 1st hour “pace yourself.”

-supervisor told me I was doing a really good job, going above and beyond and it’s being noticed and appreciated!

-everyone left me and the other new girl (on her 12th day) alone to do the closing tasks.  Which entails clean 3 locker-rooms, by spraying soap on the floors, scrubbing it in, rinsing with water, and squeegeeing it dry.  Then finishing last minute things that require empty rooms, and locking up.

-But the hose only reaches 2 of the rooms, so you have to move it in the middle of the task.

-I couldn’t twist the hose on the nozzle in the 3rd room b/c it wouldn’t thread right.

-Coworker got ready for his date in the locker room so he bent down and hooked it up.  Then he left for the night.

-we couldn’t remove the hose to finish the last 2 rooms.  Wasted 40 min trying to untwist it.

-called co-worker on his date to find out story–left VM.

-That’s OK, I had a plan B and I went to just get another hose.

-2nd hose wouldn’t attach to spout either.

-tried different hook-ups for additional 20 min before my coworker said that hose had been broken.

-That’s OK, I had a plan C, and we used the shower water to rinse (but the hose was still in room 3).

-Finished rm 1 with shower heads and buckets of water.

-Randomly saw big boss who usually leaves at 10 PM, and asked for help.

-Squeegeed floor in room 1 while big-boss worked on stuck hose in room 3.

-he ran in room 1 saying he got the hose off, but the water was on (the nozzle was in my pocket)

-He turned off the water and said the hose pops on and off, it doesn’t twist. . .  Ugh.  Nobody had mentioned that.

-It confused me, because when I tried to put the hose on, I was definitely twisting–it was a twist one and my coworker used that exact same hose. . .

-We felt stupid, embarrassed, annoyed.

-At midnight we set the alarm, and walked to our cars.

-There were 3 additional cars in the parking lot.  Uh oh.

-We had maybe(?) locked the big boss in the building, and alarmed it so touching any door or using a key would set it off.

-BUT we only knew how to arm the alarm–I don’t have or know the disarm code, so we couldn’t turn it back off.

-We couldn’t use our keys to go inside b/c we’d set off the alarm.

-The phone tree is inside the building so we couldn’t call to warn him or ask him how to disarm it.

-The building is too large to knock on doors/windows.

-So we just went home. . .  Oh well.

They may never leave us alone again, I’m not sure.  But I guess that’s not the worst thing.  I don’t always have to accept maximum responsibility at every job I have.  I can just be a worker on the team.

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