Archive | April, 2020

2016 Reading List

23 Apr

It’s an older post I never finished, but I thought I would publish it because this might give ideas to people at home because of Coronavirus.

One of my big goals for 2016 is to read more.  Yes, textbooks and class notes, but also (and mostly) books for enjoyment and betterment.

 

Here is the big challenge list:

Click to access reading%20challenge%202016.pdf

I might stick to that, but I also have my own ideas as well.

 

Books I’m interested in trying:

-ALL THE PRESIDENT’S MEN

-GUNS GERMS & STEELE

-KITCHEN CONFIDENTIAL

-SLAUGHTERHOUSE FIVE

-THE HINGER GAMES

-ONCE IN A GREAT CITY:  THE STORY OF DETROIT

-THE PENTAGON’S BRAIN

-jane eyre

-lord of the flies

-a passage to india

-gullivers travels

-the absolutely true story of a part time indian

-death of a salesman

-divergent

-the godfather

-THE MAZE RUNNER

-A MIDSUMMER NIGHTS DREAM

-THE MISEDUCATION OF CAMERON POST

-OUT OF THE DUST

-THE SCARLET LETTER

-THIRTEEN REASONS WHY

-UNCLE TOMS CABIN

-atonement

-the hunger games

-the road

-kite runner

-divergent

-the help

-the shining

-into the wild

-a clockwork orange

-shutter island

-the godfather

I Am Native American (no matter the blood quantum)

20 Apr

I will share with you an essay I wrote and used (after updating and tweaking, of course) for various different things.  It proves a point that heritage, has little to do with blood quantum (percent) and a lot to do with family traditions, how and where you were raised, the community you choose to belong to, and the customs you honor.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Asking a Native American “what percent Indian” they are is ignorant and limiting.  And it has everything to do with government funding.  The government had to cede (stolen) land to tribal members and make monetary payments in many cases, so frankly, it was in their best interest to make the bar for being considered Native American pretty high.  Thus, it limits the land lost to America and the ability of descendants to get their rightful land or funds.

It’s the same motivation, opposite direction for African Americans.  The government wanted that slave labor, so it was in their best interest to keep the bar for being considered black very low.  That way even descendants generations out had to work for free and had no rights to property.  Thus, the “one drop” definition of being black.

Both ends of the spectrum are historically rigid, and super-detrimental!  So that is why my mom is considered a tribal member, but I am not.  And why Elizabeth Warren’s claim to Native American heritage is legitimate, even though it’s a small percentage of her blood. Though, don’t get me wrong, I am not cool with having nothing to do with a culture, but then appropriating it for personal gain.  But people with that family history and who appreciate and honor their traditional culture, should be able to claim it–no matter the blood amount.

So without further adieu:

 I was born on The Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana. My great-grandfather lived in a tepee before religious missionaries put him in a boarding school where he was not allowed to speak his native language of Salish or dress in his buck-skins. The missionaries were attempting to integrate the Native Americans into white society by stripping away their Indian heritage. Despite this, our culture did not dissolve, as the stories of my ancestors were passed to me. I own authentic moccasins from one of the tribal elders, have danced with pride in pow-wows, and make delectable Indian fry bread for Thanksgiving dinner.

My mother is a recognized Confederated Salish-Kootenai Tribal member. In the 1960’s, the laws limited government help to Indians of a quarter blood quantum or more, so unfortunately, I was not able to be registered as a Tribal member of the Flathead Nation. I did experience the poverty common on the Flathead Reservation during my early childhood, however. As a little girl, I thought it was normal to eat the reservation commodities, and I still have a taste for powdered milk. We also ate meat when my parents were able to shoot a deer or catch some trout from the creek. I remember my cousins from town were not allowed to play with me, because I wore hand-me-downs.

My parents, wanting me to have more opportunity in life, started my college fund when I was a baby. My mother is the only member of the entire family who has obtained a college degree–my parents wanted me to be the second. I can see the pain in their eyes when my dad and mom tell stories of taking money out of my piggy-bank to afford basic necessities in Montana.

My Native American Heritage is something I cherish and embrace. I will be an asset to Washington State University because of the ethnic and socioeconomic factors that molded my perspectives. These will help me to display a sensitivity and tolerance toward others from all walks of life. I also bring a strong sense of pride in my work not only for myself, but my family and community.

Favorite Music from 2014

20 Apr

This was written more than 5 years ago, so I’m not sure why it was sitting in my drafts.  Maybe I meant to get pictures and videos of each one?  Which is too big of a project for today.  So I’ll just post it as I found it:

Phillip Phillips
Mariah Carey
OK Go

Boys II Men

Eric Clapton
Colbie Calliat
The Script
Jason DeRulo
John Butler Trio
Lady Antebellum
Shakira
Nick Jonas

Songs:
Thicket-Phillip Phillips

“So What” “Talkin Under Water”-Boys II Men
I’ll be There-Eric Clapton
In Your Shoes and Monster-Sarah Mclachlan
Hard Out Here-Lilly Allen
“Cleopatra”-Weezer
“Will You Marry Me” “With the Lights On” And “The Other Side”-Jason DeRulo
Scarecrow-Counting Crows
“Heart Attack.”-Enrique Iglases
“Popular”-Kristen Chenowitch
“Ain’t that Bad” And “A Little Hard-Hearted”-Melissa Etheridge
“Love Don’t Die.”-the Fray
“You Don’t Care About Me.”-Shakira

“Neon Lights”-Blake Shelton
“Hypnotic Eye”-Tom Petty
“She Used to Love Me a Lot”-Johnny Cash
“i don’t wanna break” and “Only Human” and “be my forever”-Christina Perri
“Let it be Me” and “Never Satisfied”-Jennifer Lopez

“Dollar Sign”-Better Than Ezra
What Are You Waiting for?-Nickelback
“Rock Bottom” and “American Kids”-Kenny Chesney
Hello-Kid Ink
I Wish-Toni Braxton
Drinking Class-Lee Brice

Problem-Ariana Grande
Stay with Me-Ryan Adams
Happy-Pharrell Williams
M-O-N-E-Y-Mya

Animal Ambition-50 cent

Study:
Imogen Heap
Spoon
James Vincent McMorrow
The Kooks
Timbre Timbre
Ray LaMontagne
Lana Del Ray
Santana

Bipolar Mate

16 Apr

I noticed that a post about bipolar depression was on my recently read list (I’m suspicious that person was looking for bisexual) and everything has changed since then.  The post was really frustrated and worried and helpless.  So I thought I should write an update.

import 6-17-10 167

Bipolar is still in both Cool and my daily lives.  Each day, we go through mood numbers verbally to check in with each other.  We rate mood, energy, anxiety, irritability, and love.

Mood is from 1 (suicidal) to 10 (manic psychosis).  Luckily, those numbers hang around 5 (average) to 4 (blah) and 6 (feeling real good) mostly.

Energy is ranked from usually 3 (dozing off) to 7 (fidgety, hyped-up, restless).

Anxiety and irritability are ranked 0 (none) to 3 (very bad).

We add our love points for the day (how many hugs, verbal I<3Us, etc).

The whole scale sounds a lot more complicated than it is, and when you do it every day, it goes really fast.  Lately, we’ve been going through our numbers when we do our 1 min wall-sit.

DMB at the Gorge 013

Aside from just keeping tabs better on a day to day basis, we have this binder.  Which has been a real life-saver.  In it, we have the various cycles that a bipolar person can experience:  Mania, depression, anxiety, mixed, flat, etc, etc…  Anything that changes the above numbers and may come with symptoms.  Cool writes each paper, with me contributing input and helping brainstorm.

Here’s an abridged version of what one might look like:

Mania

-everything moves too slow

-half-assing chores

-unfocused/distracted

-selfish

-bigger fashion risks

-more talkative

this usually goes on for 20-ish things that usually happen during Cool’s specific mania.  This is a key point–it’s not just symptoms out of a book.  We’ve paid attention to many manias over time, and noted the things she personally goes through.

And when I start to notice things are off, or symptoms are ramping up, I will tell her to get the binder.  And she will read each thing and say yes or no it’s happening right now.  And I count as she does.  Then at the end, we see the percent.

Exp:  She has 8 symptoms of 24 commonly experienced on her list.  8/24= 33%

Which on a science exam is not a lot, but considering it’s a third of all the symptoms she gets that we could think of, it’s enough to necessitate a medication change, and for sure to employ some strategies.

tail-gating

That’s the 2nd part of each of those pages.  For each page with a list of feelings and behaviors common to Cool’s specific cycling, we have 1 full of strategies known to help her.  These were taken from books, forums, and anywhere else she could find.  The more the better.  Then, it was just about her trying them, practicing them, and sticking with them and adding more until relief of symptoms.

So that might look like:

Depression Help

-watch a comedy

-go for a long walk

-call someone to talk

-wear favorite outfit

-pet the kitties

-play a game

And really, it comes down to medication.  But using the strategies give us both some sense of control and something we can at least try.  And we both think the more she practices the strategies, the more they help her feel better.

haunted-5k-186

So those are two huge things that have made a big difference for Cool’s mental health, my stress levels, and our relationship as a whole.  We are working as a team, and things are going pretty well most of the time.

Bad Yelp Review

15 Apr

Yelp and other reviewing sites are nice because they give customers a voice.  Before social media, it was a lot harder to have a voice, and often even if you went through all the effort of snail mail letters, making phone calls, or asking to speak to a manager–your opinion didn’t go anywhere or count for much.  That public component, makes any comments more relevant, and allows other people to jump on and agree also.  It just might lead to change…

But also, it’s a double-edged sword:

-It’s bad statistics, because not everyone goes on those sites, so it catches a certain demographic that isn’t a representative sample.  And like polls, most people with middle of the road opinions do not take the time to comment.  So you get the very bad and very good at either end of the spectrum.

-The reviews are not very accurate for the unsavvy.  Some things a business does are technical, and non-experts do not have the background information to appreciate why things are done that way.  In a restaurant setting, for example, someone may complain that the milk was pasteurized.  This reviewer wants only milk that is “natural” (aka they are a fucking idiot that doesn’t understand science and only hears the latest buzz words) so they left a bad review about it.  But they don’t know that milk is very regulated and it has to pass certain tests to even go to market.  So the restaurant couldn’t legally obtain or sell raw milk.  This also goes for medical.  What is good medicine isn’t necessarily popular w/the public.  Some things are done at the doctor’s office, dentist, and vet because they are science-based and ethical and legal.  And many people are going to be inconvenienced or angry about many of those things.  So giving that bad review lowers the ranking of the business, but is nonsense, you see?

-Someone called in sick and I got stuck working reception at a vet (lucky me) and this high-maintenance client came to pick her pet up from a dental.  Before the surgery day, she had gone over the estimate with the vet and techs.  And they each explained what would happen as they did with every client.  We always explained which costs were firm and which might change depending on what was going on in the mouth.  You can only get a cursory exam on the inside of an animal’s mouth when they’re awake, so there may be many surprises when they’re anesthetized and you can get a better look at things.

Anyway, it was guessed that only 2-3 teeth had to be extracted.  But on the big day, more like 7 had to go.  So the cost was more than the owner expected.  I was the lucky one that had to try to convey that to her, but she went hysterical, started making a scene in the lobby and was screaming and crying.  After like an hour of emotions running high (the owner’s) and price negotiations (on the part of the vet) the owner came out to run her card.  I said something offhand (honestly, I can’t remember what at this point, but nothing crazy) and she hated it and went hysterical again, refused to give me her card, and asked my name so she could give me in particular and the whole practice a terrible Yelp review.  I won’t be bullied so with confidence I spelled my name for her.  She looked shocked that I didn’t get upset or grovel to her, and asked to see my boss.

I got the vet, and could hear the owner fussing about how she didn’t like my attitude.  And I am just not going to let that kind of stuff bother me.  Also, none of this was my fault, I was just trying to check her out and feeling awkward with her scene like any person would, so I did not get reprimanded–as I shouldn’t have.  And P.S.  I checked a few times, and I don’t think that owner ever did write that bad review…

-Which brings me to my next point that it’s not all that fair that 1 really bad or really good review can ruin an overall rating.  People can just be angry and go off in a rating, and actually put people out of business over it.  And if it’s a highly specific situation, or a very one-sided story, or a non-technical opinion that’s not right.

What I really don’t care for is when staff becomes fixated on the online review and panders to it.  It’s lame to ASK customers to complete them.  And it skews the accuracy of reviews if the business asks for it.  Oh well.  So reviews are good for entertainment, but also be a conscientious reviewer and take other reviews with a grain of salt.

Working Interview (Part Deuce)

14 Apr

I feel very strongly about this subject.  See my first post [I think it’s titled:  The Working Interview:  A Concerning New Trend in Veterinary Medicine or something like that just type key words in the search on my blog] about it to get one (of at least 4) examples of my personal experiences with going through working interviews.  And it’s become totally commonplace in veterinary field.  And I’d like to comment how it’s unethical, and suggest different ways to forge that trust with potential employees–rather than exploiting them.

-Firstly, I’m not talking about your veterinary observation hours to beef up your application, nor am I talking about shelter volunteer hours for community service.  Finally, this is not a story about an internship for grades, school credit, or required experience where you know the expectations and are guaranteed to get something (NOT money, but letters, hours, recommendation, etc. . ., etc. . .) back.  I am referring to an additional interview where you perform duties and give your time to a for-profit business with the HOPE of receiving employment.

-Secondly, I feel like veterinary hopefuls want to feel righteous in giving their time away.  Like they have more passion if they are willing to work longer, crummier hours, for no benefits, and little/no money.  This is untrue–giving away your time and services doesn’t make you a better vet school candidate, show that you have more passion, or prove that you are a genuine, and better person–it only makes you more naive  AND helps the conditions at veterinary medicine stagnate.  By allowing these practices to continue by participating in them, remaining silent about them, or stigmatizing others for speaking out–YOU are contributing to unfair, unethical, and unsafe practices in a field that we all love.  Stop it!  Read some history about the industrial revolution and see how the workers who went on strike (against conditions appalling to today’s standard, and just well, standard practice back then) were emotionally, psychologically, and sometimes physically beaten down by big corporate, middle management, and peers–to see how the working interview is a repetition of by-gone times.

Job-hungry, interviewee, what to do If the WORKING INTERVIEW comes up:

-Most importantly, be aware what you are giving up if you agree to an interview.  Maybe you don’t care, in which case refer to #2 above.  Maybe you’re desperate for a job, in which case, I’m sorry.  I’ve been there too.

-Ask what to wear.  Chances are, if the potential employer requests you wear scrubs, they are expecting you to perform hands-on work, not just observe.

-Ask exactly how many hours and days will be required.  If they are non-committal or shady, I would think twice about working there.  Because, if they’re already trying to get work out of you before you’re even hired, what will it be like when you are totally dependent on that employment once hired?

-I never feel comfortable bringing up compensation, especially before you are hired, but if you have the guts (and are willing to gamble the job position) ask if you will be compensated for the time.

-DO ask what will occur if you happen to get injured during the working interview.  And don’t let them slide past the question without a firm answer.  Veterinary medicine is fraught with potential risks and harms, and you need to know how this will be handled.

-Ask what tasks you can expect to perform.  If you are uncomfortable doing any of those things as a non-employee, DO bring up why you are concerned, ie–I’m not certain I feel comfortable accepting the risk of monitoring antithetic when I am not familiar with your particular equipment or procedures.

-Don’t sign anything you are not comfortable with–and this might mean walking away from the job opportunity.  I signed stuff, and totally regret it.  It’s not right, and they know it.

-Lastly, get it in writing!  Make sure the above answers to your questions are in written form and both you and the business has a copy.  This is for everyone’s protection–and imperative.

-And the very worst part about the working interview:  Saying no to it is saying no to the job opportunity.  And that’s not ethical or right on the part of the hiring entity.

Of the employer/head vet/office manager requesting the working interview, I say:

-Would you feel comfortable defending your hiring practiced to the Department of Labor?  If not, than you need to adjust things, because you realize what you are doing now is NOT legit.  If so, proceed to my next question.

-Would you, and DO you tell your best, most particular client–this person does not work here, b/c we can’t trust the resume alone, and is going to practice technical skills on your pet?  If not–that’s not OK.  If you would–first, I give you props for having big kahonies, and 2nd continue to my third question.

-What are you going to do if this working interviewee gets injured while performing the duties of this “interview?”  This is a big question, and huge liability.

-And finally, what are you going to do if this working interviewee hurts/damages/kills a patient?

Ways for Employers to Circumvent the Working Interview:

-Look at your trusty volunteers or observers and hire the worthy.  I know the flakes are more common than not, and you should be hiring those that prove they are dependable over time.  You already know and trust them, AND they’re giving their time on their own accord.  Win-win.

-For added emphasis, I make this it’s own point.  Check out all references.  Actually talk to the people that worked closely with the candidate and listen carefully for subtitles/discrepancies.

-Make a test.  Time them filing a series of files (include business names starting with “the” and difficult ones like O’Hara, deWitt, etc…).  Have them write an essay.  Have them fill and label a prescription.  Have some math on there.  A whole thing, not just basic typing, but things they will actually need to know at your specific practice.

-Hire the good interview candidate based on resume, interview, and CHECKED references.  But do it on a fully-disclosed and discussed, paid, probationary period.  Have that person work, with highly-supervised guidance, and after a certain pre-determined, pre-discussed (PAID) time-period do a full evaluation/review where both parties talk about the good, the bad, and whether to continue the working relationship.  Honestly, this is good policy anyway.  I always had questions at jobs that I hadn’t anticipated at the interview, but there never seemed enough time to address them once I was already working.

-Hire the person, and if they don’t fit, do a shitty job, or mess up hugely–terminate their employment.  Yeah, it’s more trouble, but such is owning a business.

I would like to see the end of exploitation of all workers.  Even in the health care and service industries.  I don’t think that money is a good excuse to keep these kinds of things going–just ask Jeff Bezios or the Waltons/Lowrys how popular it is for them to keep it up.  Let’s stop making excuses and start finding solutions to change these things for the better.

All the Fake People: Miss Americana Primary Observation

13 Apr

I had cancelled Netflix before.  Because it was getting more and more expensive, while the content was stagnant.  But then 2-3 months after I did, of course Miss Americana was only released on Netflix.  I stuck to my guns to save money, read the Kaylor-verse to keep up somewhat, but was disappointed.  Then, once coronavirus locked me down for a month, I got out the credit card (no matter the email, Netflix tracks the cards) and got a free trial.  So I’m burning through all the content I ever want to see before my month runs out.

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Miss Americana top of the list.  Obviously.

It struck me that Taylor Swift’s Interactions (at least most of the ones portrayed on Miss Americana, which I understand is not everything in her life) left a lot to be desired.  And not because of anything she did or didn’t do.  I thought Taylor seemed honest, thoughtful, sweet, more open than I expected, and funny.  She was talking to others.  She told ideas, plans, and jokes.  But almost all of the people that she was talking to on the film were:  Distant, distracted, disengaged, disinterested (that may be too strong of a word), awkward, hysterical, over-emotional.  images (6)

From the start, when Taylor gets bad news in a phone call, and you can see she just wants to cry (like any person would) but she has to put on professionalism and hide her disappointment.  Yes, it’s a job and it’s important to be a professional, but it made me sad she has to build a wall around her feelings even with her own people.  In the studio, the producers seemed busy and like they were working just kind of half paying attention to what she was saying.  Brendon Urie seemed like he was half-listening and ready to dart out the door when she was excitedly describing her inspiration.  Todrick always seems self-absorbed and superficial, though I don’t really care for him, because he’s always stirring up drama so that just may be my perception.  Abigail seemed like they had grown distant and no longer know each other–but that vibe might have just been her feeling awkward to be on film (maybe?  hopefully?).  At any rate, I thought they seemed uncomfortable with each other.  Taylor’s Dad always seemed distant and authoritative, interrupting her and just being all-business from what I saw in the film.

images (7)I thought Taylor was especially gracious with her fans.  But it’s such a one-way street.  Meaning, many of them were screaming or sobbing when they saw/met her.  And I kept wondering what I would do in that situation if I was as famous as Taylor.  It’s such a weird way to interact.  And Taylor handled it really well, being sweet and funny, and really putting up with shenanigans.  Like, people, what are you expecting from Taylor when you come in so hot with that energy?  Really, how is a person supposed to react to that?  I think take it down a couple levels and treat her like she’s human.  Because if I were in her shoes I honestly wouldn’t know how to be if someone came up to me screaming, shaking, sobbing, proposing in front of me.  So major props to Taylor for being ultra cool in just strange interactions…  I think that stuff would make me feel alien and lonely.  But she was really nice, and I respect that a lot.  images (2)

I hope what the film didn’t show was real (two-way) conversations with people engaging with Taylor.  I want for her to have someone who really is on her same level, and listens to her, and cares about her (not just what she can do, or do for them).  I’m sure Miss Americana didn’t show every single thing.  So I hope what it didn’t show was so many rich, authentic relationships.  Will there be a sequel with Karlie, her friends, and her family relating to her on a more personal level?  I hope, for the entertainment value for me, and for Taylor’s sake that there’s more to see…

Directors, editors, if you’re reading this, the first film seemed like Taylor was isolated, so if that wasn’t your point, please put in more personal connections and show that she can have a conversation.  And Kaylor, always show more Kaylor 🙂 ❤ ❤ ❤

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LVT vs. Assistant

9 Apr

I wrote this at least 5 years ago, so things may have changed since my experiences (I doubt it) so remember that as you read.  I still stand by my assessment of LVTs.

In the modern schools, veterinarians are being taught to only do tasks that require their license.  Staff should do EVERY thing else, in order to be most efficient and practice at the top of the profession.  This philosophy is fine in theory.  In practice (they call it that for good reason) most vet hospitals do not PAY well enough to entice skilled employees to work for them.  With skills and licensing comes demand for better pay–and most vet hospitals are small, privately-owned operations that just can’t make that scenario work.  So what you get is what you pay for a lot of the time.  And that can be very scary if your vet sticks with the same mentality they were instructed to have in school.  Most of the vets I worked for did way, way, way more then just what was required by their license.  Because it’s ultimately their business, and because they cared about the animals and their clients.  They wanted things done right (and sometimes quickly).  When I worked for vets that didn’t do things that their license wasn’t specifically required to do, I thought they didn’t really give an eff.  And I looked down on them.  And I’m sure their clients wouldn’t have loved what they saw many of the times.

Back in the late 90s when I started volunteering in vet hospitals, most of the help were just on-the-job trained.  That’s who vets could find, and that’s who most vets could afford to pay.  As things have slowly tried to go the same way as the human side (and for-profit technical schools started popping up), there were more and more LVTs on the scene.

-Licensed Veterinary Technician (LVT).  It’s veterinary medicine’s effort to standardize care. Which in theory is a good thing. In practice, I’m not sure how great those 2 year tech programs ARE. For example, teaching how to calculate anesthetic doses seems to be a primary portion of programs, but is certainly NOT a primary duty for the majority of teching jobs. If the vet trusts the tech to do it at all (many don’t) it’s like 5 minutes out of an entire day.  There is a big discrepancy between what the technical programs are teaching and what veterinary employers want in a tech (and are able to pay that tech).

I think mostly vets want someone who:

1)  they don’t have to train (there’s no time, they’re probably already short-staffed by the time they get to the hiring process)

2)  someone will will show up.  Availability during peak times (weekends, +/- holidays, +/- nights, and mostly full time (or more) hours.  Willingness to come early, miss breaks, skip lunch, and stay late is a bonus, and sometimes necessity.

3).  Someone self-motivated that they can trust and don’t have to baby-sit.

And the daily skills commonly required on the job are things like:  Restraint times a billion, autoclaving packs, vitals, blood draws, ie simple, repetitive tasks that have to be done with competence, but don’t require any sort of genius.  And CLEANING *pet-peeve alert*.  Always the cleaning.  And everybody in the building needs to help with cleaning–don’t you dare tell me any position in a vet hospital is above cleaning.  It’s one of the most necessary and frequent parts of any of the jobs.

-I think the technical schools have their ideals in the right place, but they also need a substantial program.  If people are PAYING to attend, they have to teach something that requires skill and support it with theory.  And so to make a more legit course-load and take up a decent 2 years, they teach unnecessary things.  Things that aren’t all that useful in the real world.  Unfortunately, the schools also (either directly or indirectly, I’m not sure) teach that LVTs are PROFESSIONALS.  And as such they are 1) superior to “unskilled” assistants 2) anything that doesn’t require their license is beneath them.  Both very, very untrue sentiments.  And detrimental.

Vet hospitals need to rely on EVERYone.  And at the same time everyone is just a body and easily replaceable.  Also, everyone from the vet to the techs to the receptionists need to be able to step up (or down) to do what is needed at that moment.  That means–(again) everyone cleans.  My personal joke:  What is the difference between an LVT and an assistant?  An assistant is willing to clean.  And that comes from direct and varied experiences in multiple types of vet setting and in multiple states.

-Another problem with distinguishing licensed and assistant techs (and the resultant pay-discrepancy) is:  1)  You can’t account for on-the-job experience, nor can you teach all on-the-job skills in a 2 year span.  2)  You can’t TEACH motivation or work ethic.  I would say I was easily the hardest working employee at (at least) half of my jobs–and the ones where I wasn’t the hardest working person, it certainly wasn’t tied with any LVT.  This isn’t a brag, it’s the truth.

Do I think assistants are as good as LVTs?  Mostly.  Sure, missing a formal education taught by accredited instructors may leave gaps in knowledge.  Assistants may not know the whys behind a task.  But I would argue, the LVT often has a shaky idea of what goes on in real vet hospitals.  Often, they have an idealized view of what should happen, verses what actually happens because of realities, and also because of limitations to client money and willingness.  I think vets themselves probably go through this as well, studying what should happen then seeing what really happens.  And I do think assistants come out on top as better employees than LVTs overall because they are trained on the job so you don’t have to un-train any bad habits/expectations, they are more willing to commit longer hours and forgo breaks and come in early, etc… which is a very desirable trait to vets.  And assistants are more willing to jump in wherever necessary (phones, lugging dog food, cleaning) because they don’t have allusions that their license somehow makes certain tasks beneath them.

But it’s beginning to be a new time in the field and the LVTs have saturated the market (and set a precedent for accepting lower wages) so it’s beginning to be easier and easier for vets to require this license for hire.  I would just say–don’t forget the assistants.

Vote Blue No Matter Who

8 Apr

People died to get the right to vote

It is your Civic duty to vote

Your vote is your voice

The personal is political

Not voting, is still a vote

If you don’t vote, you don’t have the right to complain

upset Tommy

Bernie supporters on Twitter are already showing selfishness, entitlement, unrealistic expectations, naivete, etc… by saying they are not going to vote at all, or worse–they’re voting for Trump.

If you’re voting for Trump, you were never progressive.  You were never going to vote based on ethics.  It’s gross.

The whole attitude makes me frustrated.  What could be worse than Trump?  He is doing sometimes irreversible damage.  He has to go.  He cannot get another Supreme Court pick–those are life long terms.  The peddling of lies and disinformation has to stop.  His sewing of distrust of science and media are alarming.  He shouldn’t be allowed to undercut our democracy anymore.  He can’t ruin the environment anymore.  LGBT will lose the little progress that has been eked out.  The racism…  Not voting ensures more of this.

And if you don’t like Biden–neither do I.  Honestly, I didn’t want a rich, old, white man to lead the country–the world, because they do not represent my interests.  They don’t understand who I am as a female or what my needs and desires are as an American citizen.  But politics are effed.  I don’t like the system either, but you have to work within that system or nothing at all will ever change.

Voting is an essential right and duty.  Change happens slowly, our government is designed with checks and balances, so that it intentionally moves slowly.  But it’s important that it moves forward, not backward.

I think we can all agree that after Obama was elected there has been a backlash.  The conservatives, the right, the republicans, the rich, the racists are “over-correcting”  those 8 liberal years.  Which I’d argue weren’t liberal enough in many respects and were actually, fairly unproductive (because of blocks in congress) for the most part.

Which is why we have to get the far right out of the White House while there is still something to salvage.  Please, please vote.  Vote the lessor of two evils.  Vote for the cabinet.  Vote so that we don’t lose anymore of our nation’s values.  Whatever you need to tell yourself to justify it.  Just vote.

Biden is better than Trump.  a silver-alert runaway is better than Trump.  A clown is better than Trump.  My cat would be better than Trump.  My cat’s favorite mouse toy would be better than Trump.  Diarrhea is better than Trump.

opposing parties

Vote Blue No Matter Who.

Best of All the Places I’ve Lived

7 Apr

I’m taking all my favorite things from every place I’ve lived and making one great city with them:

 

Arizona

saguaros

red faced love birds

sunsets

Mercury WNBA games

Bitter & Twisted

Snooze AM

The Phoenix Zoo

no snow/ice in winter

Mill Street

Social Hall

the Hippy Store

Suns NBA games

 

Utah

the Jordan River Trail (especially the Rose Park leg) with all it’s birds & animals

ArtsFest

Tracy Aviary

walking from Wasatch to downtown

HS all-weather track (open 24/7)

all the different birds everywhere

Cheesecake Factory (w/in walking distance of our apartment)

Raw Bean (chiller = ice cream + espresso + flavor syrup)

Uptown Cheapskate

the Temple’s Christmas lights

Bourbon House

Squatters Brewery

Sundance Film Festival

Gracie’s patio (and Halloween costume contest)

kitty-rose

Jazz NBA games

Pride Parade

Wasatch mountains so close

the Temple’s spring garden (looks like Wonderland)

City Creek (especially at Christmas with the lights & fountains)

seasons

High West in Park City

Prohibition (restaurant)

 

Spokane

Green Bluff (you-pick farm conglomeration)

the community college all-weather track (open 24/7)

Grocery Outlet!

Steelhead

Flying Goat (goat cheese balls and D-street pizza made of curry and potatoes)

living next to a river

Riverfront Park

NoLi (patio by the river)

house sitting for the cousins

Julyamish powwow

my co-workers at the YMCA

proximity to Walla Walla & the Gorge (& CdL to a lessor extent)

 

Seattle

Freemont (especially the colored sidewalk art)

Melting Pot in Queen Anne

watching the Storm WNBA live

Basalu ham & cheese croissant (so good I literally dream of it)

The Ram (burgers & brews)

all the different coffee shops

Union Lake, Montlake cut, Gasworks Parks (all the good picture opportunities)

Theo Chocolate

Blue Moon Burgers

the troll under the freeway

Kerry Park

 

Missouri

all the concerts

cheapest gas prices in the country

cheap groceries

proximity to STL and KC (and Chicago)

Tropical Liquors (alcohol slushies you can drink there or take to-go)

Saki (Saturday)

Katy Trail (goes thru whole state)

PrideFest

Twilight Fest

9th Street video (indy DVD rental)

Shakespeares Pizza

proximity to other states

wineries

Flatbranch

 

Reno

Reno Balloon Races (& Dawn Patrol)

Wild Waters

the downtown ‘biggest little city’ arch & skyline

relatively easy freeways

outdoor shopping centers

 

Dayton

smell of sagebrush after rain

dark, dark nights

very quiet

less traffic

proximity to Lake Tahoe

 

Montana

beautiful sky

powwow in Arlee

huckleberries

Bison Range

Missoula

green scenery