Tag Archives: analysis

The Lighthouse Analysis: I. Timeline

10 Oct

I wanted to give my readers a chance to digest my best guesses at what’s going on in The Lighthouse film. The master post is long, so I have also published each section (exact same) on it’s own.

All the Disclaimers:

*Spoilers ahead

*To lesson confusion, I will be referring to the older lighthouse keeper as “Older” and the younger as “Younger” bc the names change throughout the film.

*The clues are offered in a non-linear way

The clues are more disjointed in the film, not presented in a linear way. Which is both why it’s difficult for the audience to grasp the true timeline, to tell who is who, and also for me to write a post without skipping around. I apologize, blame the author/director.

*The movie NEVER indicates the timeline is off. It is intentionally disjointed to confuse the viewer and have us question what is real.

The plot/story/interaction begins before the audience gains access and events take place prior to the beginning of this film.

I think the audience is viewing the movie after the story has already started. In the very first scene of the film, Younger goes to his room. But he digs at the bed. There is a hole. And he has to remove a piece of stuffing. He has hidden a mermaid figure in the mattress. And he didn’t stumble upon it, he retrieves it in a knowing way. The movie is telling the audience that we came to view later then the very beginning of the action. This is not the first time Younger has been in the room–it’s the audience’s first time seeing the room. The timeline of events starts PRIOR to the start of the film.

One of the first big hints that the story has begun before we started viewing is the first dinner (that we see). Older is really trying to push liquor on Younger, and Younger is very resistant to drinking. To the point that Younger pours the liquor down the sink and gets some water. The water is a big clue. It is already fucked up.

It’s at that point, the first dinner, the audience sees that something dead is in the water tank. And it’s still unclear which of the men is responsible.

Later, we see Younger look into the water tank and see a dead bird. Not a man, a bird. It’s the evidence the audience needed for why the water is fucked up. Older, told us earlier birds represent the souls of dead sailors. And Younger didn’t see a man, he saw a bird. That let’s us know that Younger is not in reality. He has separated murdering a man in his mind. Which is why, when confronted with reality, Younger’s first instinct is to grab the nearest bird and kill it–horribly. He is “killing” the knowledge of what he’s done. Younger has killed the man (in his alternate reality seen as a bird) in the tank.

This is enforced in an earlier scene. Younger is going about his chores and a bird blocks his way, and squawks accusatorily. That scene is telling the audience, “Remember the fucked up water, which we learned was caused by a dead body in the water tank? Well, the spirit of the dead sailor (the birds) is saying which man in the lighthouse did it–Younger.”

The Lighthouse [2019 film] (and my guesses as to what’s happening)

9 Oct

*Spoilers ahead

*To lesson confusion, I will be referring to the older lighthouse keeper as “Older” and the younger as “Younger” bc the names change throughout the film.

*The clues are offered in a non-linear way

The clues are more disjointed in the film, not presented in a linear way. Which is both why it’s difficult for the audience to grasp the true timeline, to tell who is who, and also for me to write a post without skipping around. I apologize, blame the author/director.

*The movie NEVER indicates the timeline is off. It is intentionally disjointed to confuse the viewer and have us question what is real.

The plot/story/interaction begins before the audience gains access and events take place prior to the beginning of this film.

I think the audience is viewing the movie after the story has already started. In the very first scene of the film, Younger goes to his room. But he digs at the bed. There is a hole. And he has to remove a piece of stuffing. He has hidden a mermaid figure in the mattress. And he didn’t stumble upon it, he retrieves it in a knowing way. The movie is telling the audience that we came to view later then the very beginning of the action. This is not the first time Younger has been in the room–it’s the audience’s first time seeing the room. The timeline of events starts PRIOR to the start of the film.

One of the first big hints that the story has begun before we started viewing is the first dinner (that we see). Older is really trying to push liquor on Younger, and Younger is very resistant to drinking. To the point that Younger pours the liquor down the sink and gets some water. The water is a big clue. It is already fucked up.

It’s at that point, the first dinner, the audience sees that something dead is in the water tank. And it’s still unclear which of the men is responsible.

Later, we see Younger look into the water tank and see a dead bird. Not a man, a bird. It’s the evidence the audience needed for why the water is fucked up. Older, told us earlier birds represent the souls of dead sailors. And Younger didn’t see a man, he saw a bird. That let’s us know that Younger is not in reality. He has separated murdering a man in his mind. Which is why, when confronted with reality, Younger’s first instinct is to grab the nearest bird and kill it–horribly. He is “killing” the knowledge of what he’s done. Younger has killed the man (in his alternate reality seen as a bird) in the tank.

This is enforced in an earlier scene. Younger is going about his chores and a bird blocks his way, and squawks accusatorily. That scene is telling the audience, “Remember the fucked up water, which we learned was caused by a dead body in the water tank? Well, the spirit of the dead sailor (the birds) is saying which man in the lighthouse did it–Younger.”

The Audience is seeing things from Younger’s (altered) perspective

Hints of the timeline are also given away by flashes of Older’s dialogue. He tells events that we as the audience just saw for ourselves, differently. The very first time that the viewer understands the food got wet and supplies are short (when Younger “found out”), Older says, “I told you to ration 3 weeks ago, but you wouldn’t.” At the time, the audience thinks Older is gaslighting, but it’s actually the true timeline. The movie is reminding us that we are only seeing things as Younger is seeing them, and also we were dropped in to watch after events had already started.

The work is also this way. We see Younger toiling, doing hard physical labor every second of every day. Yet, Older sees the floor is dirty and tells Younger to clean it. Yet again, the audience is led to believe that Older is picking on Younger, taking pleasure in making him do menial tasks. And Younger says, “I already swept and mopped it twice!” But Older sees the floor is dirty, and says (this is important), “You never take accountability.” This tells the viewer why we’re seeing this alternate reality.

And this split from reality is shown again when Younger “finds” the head in the crab (lobster) trap/pot [whatever it was, I don’t remember exactly]. Same as when he opened the water tank to find a dead bird, Younger acts shocked. He has divorced his actions from his thoughts/perspective because he does not take accountability for his actions. But we know already that Younger has killed someone (the birds told us) and put their body in the water tank.

The Drinking Shows the battle between id and ego

Other analysts felt the film was Jungien, with Ego being Older and Id being Younger. The Ego/Older drinks and farts. The Id/Younger is a teetotaler and toils. And it really becomes clear this was an inspiration to the author with the drinking. Remember how Younger was very resistant to it at first, and Older was pushing it on him? Younger acted very repressed in his abstinence. It shows that Younger fabricated Older in his mind as a scape goat for some bad base desires.

Once there’s the calm before the storm, Older finally convinces Younger to drink. It seems once this demon is released, Younger really embraces getting enumbriated. Then they get drunk again and again throughout the rest of the film. And instead of food cached in the dirt, it’s more liquor. And they are so hedonistic that they drink Karosene for the ethanol.

Older is a figment of Younger’s split from reality

Probably the most enlightening scene in the movie is the one where both Older and Younger are drunk. Younger says his name is actually also Tom. Older has previously said his actual name is Thomas Wake (he goes by Wake). The two men have the same name.

We know a primary characteristic of Older is his messed up leg. And he tells several variations of how the leg came to be that way. Then, we are also shown when Younger falls off the scaffold while white-washing the light house and hurts his leg. And a bird pecks at the leg.

When Younger is drunk, both he and Older have this weird exchange where they say, “What?” “What” They say it over and over, sort of mirroring thoughts. I think it’s supposed to be a clue that Older and Younger are the same.

Older’s dialog sounds like poetry. It’s another clue for the audience. Younger has constructed this figment who talks like a book character, Moby Dick? And he has all the power in their relationship, and at the lighthouse. And a big part of Moby Dick is the symbolic struggle for power. Same here.

Impossible desire to overcome nature, gain enlightenment

Aside from telling the viewer that these are not two separate people, this Ahab-like character, of Older, shows the struggle between man and nature, power, and knowledge.

The light is a symbol of forbidden knowledge, enlightenment and pleasure. Older has sole access to it, which peeves Younger. Younger is not a fan of authority. Younger wants his turn, sneaks in to see masturbatory light/sea creature action, considers killing Older to gain entry, and eventually begs for access.

The mermaid figurine and the human-like mermaid show Younger’s desire to “conquer” nature and achieve the pleasure of that knowledge and power. He uses the figure to masturbate, but toward the end of the movie it doesn’t work–he’s left frustrated. He has sexual fantasies of the woman-like mermaid also. But again, he is unable to copulate because her anatomy is fishy. He’s trying to dominate nature, and his failure symbolizes that man can never truly conquer nature.

The waves and the weather of course symbolize the struggle of man vs. nature and a power dynamic man must submit to. Notice just as soon as Younger kills the bird, the weather vain points North. Everything goes awry after this (to the audience).

Escape or rescue from the isolated lighthouse island is also thwarted by nature. The waves are unruly.

The action before the movie started

So who’s in the water tank? Late in the movie, a notebook washes up in the disheveled, water-logged lighthouse living quarters. It has notes about Younger’s poor work performance and indicates the boss does not want to pay him. The audience assumes this boss is Older. And Older is gaslighting and manipulating in order to get Younger to do all the work, then steal his money. But remember, we are seeing everything through Younger’s (altered) perspective.

This book is, I think, the key to the action that happened before the movie started and the audience got to observe. Conversations detail that Younger came to the lighthouse to get away from the logging industry. And Younger tells Older that he has had many jobs, going from one to the next, all his life.

And on another drunken night, Younger “spills his beans” and admits that he left timber because the foreman was killed in an accident. This shows a pattern. WE can assume Younger did not take accountability for his part in this death. And he stole the foreman’s identity (shows deceit). We can understand Younger may hate authority and resent power over him. In his mind, he’s doing excellent work and these authority figures are picking on him. So he kills them, but his mind constructs an alternate reality so he never feels responsible for the murders.

This key unlocks the entire movie. Younger killed his boss at the logging industry, came to the lighthouse and in his mind worked hard, only to be picked on again and his pay withheld. It made him angry and he killed the lighthouse boss.

The severed head, the body in the water tank–is the REAL lighthouse boss. The audience came in after his death so we never met him (alive).

To sum up, MASCULINITY/POWER is the whole theme of the film.

The lighthouse itself is phalic. Younger feels like he’s a housewife submitting to Older’s demands. The pair argue about the cooking (traditionally a female chore). Younger’s masculinity is threatened.

The sexual tension/revulsion between Younger and Older are ever-present when they’re drinking. They dance like lovers, reveal intimate information, and Older lies his head on Younger’s lap. Also, there might be some shadow sex, but maybe I was seeing things… That dynamic, speaks to Younger’s wanting to become one with Older (because deep inside his brain he knows already Older is a part of him). Joining together is therefore attractive because it would rectify such an unnatural mental divergence. But also, Younger can’t take accountability and being one with Older would force him to evaluate his deeds realistically.

The scene where Younger sneaks up to check out what Older is doing in the lighthouse is sexual. Older had already referred to the lighthouse in feminine terms, calling it a woman, and now some weird sexy action is going on. And fish fins are observed, tying the encounter back to the mermaids and the impossible desire to dominate them.

The mermaid masturbation and sex are also about the desire to dominate and the inability to do so. Man cannot dominate over nature. Ahab couldn’t, and trying made him crazy. Same with Younger. He tries to attain this power and sees himself doing masculine tasks, masturbates… But he is still subservient to Older.

Which is why, at the end of the movie, Younger forces Older to bark like a dog and crawl on all fours. Older has emasculated Younger and now must feel the same humiliation, he must pay the price. Then Younger buries Older alive. In burying Older, Younger is burying the truth of his deeds. He is burying the reality of what he’s actually done. This mental split will never be united, Younger is burying the truth forever.

The end references Greek Mythology. I do not have very much knowledge of mythology so this comparison is bare-bones from me, but check out other analysis of this film, because other s thought this was a primary theme of the movie (I don’t). Proteus represents Older, an older prophetic ocean God, or man of the sea as Homer described him. And Prometheus’ (Younger’s) death is foreshadowed. I don’t think the movie fleshes out this theme overall, and it’s not entirely based on mythology, but definitely an inspiration for the author of this screenplay/book/writing.

When Younger does finally get to the light. It’s too much. It overwhelms him and he falls down the stairs where the birds (souls of dead sailors) peck at his body while he’s alive.

Conclusion

I didn’t understand any of this while watching the movie. And the movie was entertaining and spooky and I liked it very much even without knowing quite what happened. So watch it, for sure!

But while I was trying to sleep, my mind was connecting the dots I have laid out here. And this reading makes a lot of sense to me. I think this is the type of movie you don’t understand until the second viewing. I feel like if I watch it now, things would “click” a lot better. I’m going to buy it bc you’d probably notice something new on every viewing.

Hoax: Analysis of Taylor Swift’s folklore (from larger post) Addition Added: The Lakes

31 Aug

This is a more digestible portion of my album analysis:

 

Here, I have tried to analyze what and who each track of Folklore is about.  Which is complex because it’s not in a linear order.  Names are obscured.  Facts may be reality or story.  The narrator is unreliable.  And this whole thing is going to be from a Kaylor perspective, because that’s how the songs, and Taylor Swifts catalog as a whole makes the best sense to me.  I’ll show you what I mean.

 

16. Hoax.

This song is difficult for me to listen to.  It’s just so bleak.  And I can’t believe Swift ended this album on such a hopeless note (and no final voice memo or anything).  Maybe The Lakes will be lighter–I haven’t received my merch yet.

“My only one”  The first song, The One told us Taylor was looking back at her choices.  now she says the subject of this last song is “my ONLY one”.  I think even more than being about 1 person this song is the bookend that shows bittersweet of what her life DID turn out as after all these choices, endings, breakups… This is the conclusion to the album.

“Smoking gun” is the clue that unlocks a mystery.  When Taylor is with Karlie, it’s impossible NOT to see their love.  And they got caught kissing.  Karlie outs Taylor because their love is evident.

“My eclipsed Sun.”  The sun again symbolizes Karlie, but also Daylight where Taylor can come out and be openly queer.  Taylor is saying that she is still in shade, because she’s afraid to come out of the closet.  And also Karlie is eclipsed under the shadow of the fake Kushner marriage, and is also partially in the shadows since Kaylor has a hidden, closeted relationship.

“Your faithless loves the only hoax I believe in.” Faithless, because Karlie is cheating on her “husband”. “Your sleight of hand” is Karlie acting like her marriage to a man is real–when it isn’t.

“My best laid plan” is Taylor’s Lover era where she was going to come out. But circumstances prevented it.

She’s also telling that her situation is bittersweet because to be authentic to herself, Taylor has some hard choices that she must follow through with.

“Don’t want no other shade of blue but you, no other sadness in the world would do.”  Taylor, despite all the sadness and complication of all the bearding and closeting and being gay.  She would choose Karlie because it’s authentic and true, but it has taken a toll.

Such a bummer.  And really lends credence to the Kaylor breakup theories.  The only thing that tells me they’re still together are Karlie’s spoiler/promo pics 13 days prior to the secret album release.  She HAD to know, know.  We’ll see what follows in real life.

 

+++Addition+++

I finally got The Lakes, and as such needed to add my analysis to the main post. And you really can’t without discussing Hoax too. They’re companion songs, yin and yang, can’t have one without the other.

Hoax:  I’m glad Taylor released an additional song, because I think this one is too negative and depressing to end an album.  It is melancholy and Taylor sounds a little defeated in it.  She basically says she’s sad, but nothing else will work, she is going to live with the sadness because her heart is taken with this person.  It’s a little bit, ‘victim of domestic abuse’ a mentality.  “This has frozen my ground”–pay attention, this becomes important later.  The piano and strings are beautiful, but the lyrics are just so dreary.  Don’t get me wrong, it’s a good song–I just wish Taylor was happy, and the subject was not hurting her.

The Lakes:  The first sounds remind me of when a movie shows a record player.  A litter antiquated and slightly degraded.  I think this song is chock full of poetry references, but let me be honest–that is not where my interests lie, so I didn’t take the time to do a true analysis.  The musical backing sounds much more optimistic than the prior couple of songs on the album (Peace and Hoax).  And Taylor makes sure to indicate she wants to leave her life for this dreamscape–but not without her muse.  “A red rose grew up out of ice frozen grounds…” is a good symbol for the barren loneliness and horribleness that Taylor’s relationship with her lover grew out of.  Things were bad and cold and icy, but from that stemmed (pun!) a beautiful red flower (glitch rose, Klossy?). 

Since it follows the depression of hoax, it shows Taylor has come through all of that negativity, that’s not where the story ends (a break up and toxicity) afterall.  It’s a more optimistic closer–thank goodness.  Also, Taylor is known to start the next album from the last song of the previous so this gives the listener a hint maybe the next album will be from some English chateaux where Taylor is holed up with her lover, doing what she does best–writing.

Peace: Analysis of Taylor Swift’s folklore (from larger post)

30 Aug

This is a more digestible portion of my album analysis:

 

Here, I have tried to analyze what and who each track of Folklore is about.  Which is complex because it’s not in a linear order.  Names are obscured.  Facts may be reality or story.  The narrator is unreliable.  And this whole thing is going to be from a Kaylor perspective, because that’s how the songs, and Taylor Swifts catalog as a whole makes the best sense to me.  I’ll show you what I mean.

 

15. Peace.

From perspective of Karlie Kloss. “I’m a fire…” Remember she’s a Leo, a fire sign. And she goes on to say she’ll keep Taylor’s heart warm. “People think loves for show, but I’d die for you in secret.” Is this Karlie acknowledging the fans on social media who troll her for trying to ‘use Taylor ‘s career to succeed’? Who accuse her of queer-baiting Kaylors to get fans? When, in fact, Karlie deeply loves Taylor in private. In the song, Karlie remembers how Taylor had the butterfly angel wing (that look a lot like ones Karlie walked in one time at a show) mural commissioned in the Lover Era, by saying “you paint dreamscapes on the wall.” It might also mean The Lover music video and Taylor’s art in general, which often (secretly) portrays their love. “Family I chose” is a very gay line, “Now that I see your brother as my brother.” Taylor has a brother, who would be newly related to Karlie if there was a marriage.

The “robbers in the East” might be talking about the Kushners she’s tied to. And the white house that stopped their coming out plans in the Lover Era. And “Clowns to the West” might be Scott B. and Scooter giving Taylor so much trouble with her music catalog. And of course KimYe in LA, who are constantly stirring up trouble for Taylor.

But Karlie emphasizes “I’d give you my sunshine.” That Leo sun again. “The Devils in the details.” Makes me think of DWOHT a kiss gate song where they were outed by someone “grinnin’ like a devil.” It was at that point, Karlie and Taylor hid safely in the closet, ramped up the bearding, and each complicated her individual life, and their relationship. The details she speaks of might be ending the bearding contracts and being together for real without violating any non-disclosure agreements or creating political enemies.

This song is Karlie assuring the audience that she’s suffering also, but she is genuine and she wants to have a real, meaningful, authentic, loving relationship with Taylor.  And it’s going to come back out in the public as soon as those details get sorted out.

Betty: Analysis of Taylor Swift’s folklore (from larger post)

29 Aug

This is a more digestible portion of my album analysis:

 

Here, I have tried to analyze what and who each track of Folklore is about.  Which is complex because it’s not in a linear order.  Names are obscured.  Facts may be reality or story.  The narrator is unreliable.  And this whole thing is going to be from a Kaylor perspective, because that’s how the songs, and Taylor Swifts catalog as a whole makes the best sense to me.  I’ll show you what I mean.

 

14. Betty.

This is the song that unlocks the ‘high school love triangle’ angle of the album.  This is also the song that made most listeners stop and go, “hmmm, this song doesn’t seem super-straight…”  It’s from James’ perspective, and we know that because the person telling this song is invited into a car by name.

But I spy inconsistencies.  “Betty, one time I was riding my skateboard when I passed your house it’s like I can’t breathe.”  This might sound like a stereotype, and I apologize.  But I’ve known teenage guys, and the ones I have had contact with don’t have the emotional maturity to go breathless about a girl.  The ones I know might think a girl is cute, or have a crush, or want sex, but I’ve never known them at a teen age to get like, no breath about it.  That seems very female to me.  But I’m female, so it’s difficult to go outside my own perspective–just as it was probably difficult for Taylor.  And at the end, James put on Betty’s cardigan.  Does a guy wear his girlfriend’s sweater?

Taylor was named after James Taylor.  And Karlie Elizabeth (Betty is a nickname for Elizabeth) Kloss is the other female in this story, Betty.  And Taylor mentions the cobblestones, streetlight, and also the garden of the romantic Lover album.  Hello, “Cruel Summer” fame “sneaking through your garden gate just to seal my fate” then in real life Karlie Kloss sells her condo, and featured in the real estate ad is a garden?  And there’s pictures of Taylor going in and out of a garden gate in that same neighborhood.

So yeah, there’s some high school kids mixed in this song.  And age of 17.  A gym and a school dance.  But that’s just the unreliable narrator again.  Taylor even confirms that she’s James in the “Cardigan” music video–she puts on that cardigan at the end.  And has a knowing look.  Yup, I’m James.

Mad Woman and also Epiphany: Analysis of Taylor Swift’s folklore (from larger post)

28 Aug

This is a more digestible portion of my album analysis:

 

Here, I have tried to analyze what and who each track of Folklore is about.  Which is complex because it’s not in a linear order.  Names are obscured.  Facts may be reality or story.  The narrator is unreliable.  And this whole thing is going to be from a Kaylor perspective, because that’s how the songs, and Taylor Swifts catalog as a whole makes the best sense to me.  I’ll show you what I mean.

 

12. Mad Woman.

This is musically my favorite song on the album.  And I always appreciate a good bitter song.  Chapter 2 of The Man.  “Cause you took everything [her masters] from me.  Watching you climb over people like me [other singers] The MASTER [not an accidental word] of spin.” Then Taylor goes low and says, “has a couple of side flings good wives always know.”  She knows she can away with calling him out because she has already explained to the audience that Folklore is just stories.  Scooter Braun cheats on his wife. And Taylor said it.  But maybe she didn’t because remember our unreliable narrator.

 

13. Epiphany.

This is my least favorite song on the album.  It’s too short, and not thought out very well.  It had potential to be a comparison between war and Covid, but came short.  In My opinion, a little disjointed of a song. I think it’s about PTSD. 1st regarding war. Apparently about Swift’s veteran grandfather.  Then sickness, probably Covid. The song would be better if there was a 3rd trauma. Or if it covered 1 trauma at greater depth.

Invisible String: Analysis of Taylor Swift’s folklore (from larger post)

27 Aug

 

This is a more digestible portion of my album analysis:

 

Here, I have tried to analyze what and who each track of Folklore is about.  Which is complex because it’s not in a linear order.  Names are obscured.  Facts may be reality or story.  The narrator is unreliable.  And this whole thing is going to be from a Kaylor perspective, because that’s how the songs, and Taylor Swifts catalog as a whole makes the best sense to me.  I’ll show you what I mean.

 

11. Invisible String.

It’s important that this is the song that follows “Illicit Affairs.”  This track shows all is well with Kaylor.  Despite everything, Taylor believes Karlie is her soulmate. And I think this song is about Karlie, because green is mentioned. Karlie has green eyes. Bad blood is also mentioned though obscured, lyrically. That’s a music video Karlie was in. “Looked like an American” references the interview with a handful of VS Angels where Karlie says Taylor is an American girl.

“Pulled me out of all the wrong arms into that dive bar.” Perhaps the one from Delicate? My biggest hint that this song is about Karlie is “one single thread of gold tied me to you.” Gold.  Color of Leos and fire and sunshine.  The color associated with Karlie.  And I know they’re still happy and together because “Hell was my journey [the journey she’s remembering across the songs in this album] but it brought me to heaven.” And she talks of Karlie being the Lover album’s muse by singing, “Gave me the blues then purple pink skies.”

As a side note Taylor explains that those previous people in her life that made her mad enough to write songs–she’s over that.  Now she sends their children gifts.

I love this song and how romantic a thought that these two people were always meant for each other.  Every failed relationship, every fork in the road–led them on the path right to each other.

Illicit Affairs: Analysis of Taylor Swift’s folklore (from larger post)

26 Aug

This is a more digestible portion of my album analysis:

 

Here, I have tried to analyze what and who each track of Folklore is about.  Which is complex because it’s not in a linear order.  Names are obscured.  Facts may be reality or story.  The narrator is unreliable.  And this whole thing is going to be from a Kaylor perspective, because that’s how the songs, and Taylor Swifts catalog as a whole makes the best sense to me.  I’ll show you what I mean.

 

10. Illicit Affairs.

Maybe “break up of Karlie’s marriage” bc she was cheating w/Taylor.  But please, show me the marriage certificate.  Show me an actual marriage record for Karlie and Jared.  She is a model and went to a wedding photo shoot.  He is in a long term relationship with a man named Mike.  He needs a woman to seal his dirty deals.  She was in a long time contract to be his fake girlfriend, and because of Trump’s election, she couldn’t extricate from that cleanly.  Taylor can’t be super mad or upset, because she has also been having fake boyfriends for years.  “Look at this godforsaken mess you made me.. .  Look at this idiotic fool that you made me”  It’s a problem.  It’s a complication.

Enter this song.  It sets up a “real” love triangle.  This shows Karlie “cheating” on Jared with Taylor.  “But they lie and they lie and they lie” is a line that talks about how the relationship is a lie, their position in the White House is a lie, and the way the Kushners make money is a lie.  It’s all fake.  But Swift clarifies, “Tell your friends you’re out for a run [which is a very visible part of Karlie’s social media] You’ll be flushed when you return.” Taylor is spelling out the her and Karlie have sex.

But in the end, Taylor conveys over and over she will stick with it.  This is not a breakup of Kaylor.  On the contrary, Taylor can only be herself when she’s with Karlie.  Their whole situation is a mess, but she really loves Karlie and no one else does it for her:

“You showed me colors [in screaming color!] I can’t see with anyone else”

“You taught me a secret language I can’t speak with anyone else.”

“And you know damn well for you I would ruin myself a million little times.”

Seven & August: Analysis of Taylor Swift’s folklore (from larger post)

23 Aug

This is from my other, longer post.  I thought some people would like it in smaller increments.  here’s 2 relatively short ones:

 

Here, I have tried to analyze what and who each track of Folklore is about.  Which is complex because it’s not in a linear order.  Names are obscured.  Facts may be reality or story.  The narrator is unreliable.  And this whole thing is going to be from a Kaylor perspective, because that’s how the songs, and Taylor Swifts catalog as a whole makes the best sense to me.  I’ll show you what I mean.

 

7. Seven

The companion song to “It’s nice to have a friend” (if you recall “Something gave you the nerve to touch my hand” which is decidedly not a childhood unromantic thing to do).  Taylor describes a very Sapphic relationship with a young PA neighbor in her elementary years.  “Your braids like a pattern” emphasizes the femaleness of this friend Taylor says she loved then, and still loves now.  The line in the song that says, “or hide in the closet” is not an accident.  Taylor is an honest writer and a woman of 30–she knows what that phrase means.  And she used in intentionally.  In telling this childhood story, she’s saying that her queerness is nothing new.  She has had it in her the whole time.  And she’s just now alluding it to her fans, and the public.

Also, each person’s story is not the central position of my song analysis, but I’d be remiss not to mention Taylor also alludes the the fact this girl-neighbor may have been in an abusive household.  It sounds like her father wasn’t a good guy, so that’s a central premise of the song as well as the childhood love component.

 

8.  August.

This song is supposedly the perspective of the 3rd person in the ‘high school love triangle’ of Betty & James and this person.  Who is it? If anyone. Is this just a generic song to round out the love triangle?

I’m not sure who it’s supposed to be about, though it does brings up someone’s 1st (female) sexual experience with, “whispers of Are you sure?’ ‘Never have I ever before.’”  “And I can see us twisted in bedsheets.”  This section reminds me of Reputation’s, “…Ready for It?” and “Dress” which are also pretty sexy songs.

But it talks about this 3rd wheel feeling like James was never hers.  And it’s not during high school, because “August slipped away like a bottle of wine.”

Main message in this song, “you were never mine.”  That line is repeated 4 times during the short song.

 

My Tears Ricochet: Analysis of Taylor Swift’s folklore (from larger post)

16 Aug

This is a more digestible portion of my album analysis:

 

Here, I have tried to analyze what and who each track of Folklore is about.  Which is complex because it’s not in a linear order.  Names are obscured.  Facts may be reality or story.  The narrator is unreliable.  And this whole thing is going to be from a Kaylor perspective, because that’s how the songs, and Taylor Swifts catalog as a whole makes the best sense to me.  I’ll show you what I mean.

 

5.  My Tears Ricochet.

Not every song on Folklore describes a romantic relationship.  I think this song is about Taylor leaving the music label (BMR) that initially signed her.  She sings, “I could have gone anywhere. Just not home.” which is how she initially thought of her label.  Scott B. had been a paternal figure, but also controlling.  He made many decisions about her music that Taylor disagreed with.  And when she left, it wasn’t on good terms.  She was angry and he was mean.  “Wishing I’d stayed.” is a lyric that shows Scott B. liked making money off of Taylor, but refused to have a more collaborative partnership with her, wanting to control her every move.  “Stolen lullabies” is of course, mentioning the masters Scott B. sold to Taylor’s nemesis, Scooter Braun.  And remember how at the time Taylor said there were tears (“Tears Ricochet?!) in her eyes every time Scooter’s name came up.  “Cursing my name, wishing I’d stayed.” reiterates how Scott wasn’t ready to let go of Taylor, the cash cow, and he’s holding her music catalog hostage.