Tag Archives: application

Saint George Vet: Public Health

30 Jun

Public Health Essays:

If you have experience in the area you wish to study, describe that experience.

I volunteered once a week in the organic chemistry stock room when I was a freshman at the University of Nevada, Reno. I measured, prepared, and mixed solutions for student labs, transferred chemicals into bottles under the hood, checked lab materials out to students, re-stocked chemicals after labs, and washed dishes. I was trained to handle hazardous chemicals, spills, and waste in the laboratory environment, as well as the importance of lab procedure.

Chem lab-not mineMy semester volunteering in a laboratory setting gave me an advantage in my chemistry classes and gave me the motivation and confidence to pursue a minor in chemistry. Taking an additional chemistry lecture and four-hour laboratory to obtain that chemistry minor gave me the analytical skills and laboratory techniques necessary to excel in any research situation.

I have worked in animal laboratory settings as well. Besides my research jobs at University of Missouri, I was able to accompany Dr. Sharp on his rounds at Charles River Laboratories. He checked the stools of Cynomolgus macaques, Cynomolgus rhesus, and marmosets, looked for lesions and possible research-ending health problems, and prescribed medication. I was able to remove sutures from one of the primates and feed crackers to the monkeys in the group pens.

My background in chemistry and my extensive animal experience will enable me to pursue veterinary jobs in public health. Earning a concurrent degree would help me build knowledge and confidence in areas such as monitoring the production of vaccinations and antibiotics as they are researched, developed, and tested for use in both animals and people.

Interview: MU Vet Med

4 Jun

Z-O-U

Interview
What does a vet do?
Vets work long hours to educate owners, treat animals, perform surgery, engage in research, and promote the veterinary field.
What is best about being a vet?
I enjoy the combination of skills that a veterinarian is required to use on a daily basis. A vet has to be mentally capable, physically fit, dexterous with her hands, compassionate, and be prepared for anything.
What is worst about being a vet?
My least favorite aspect of the job is seeing pet owners who are not willing to do anything for their animal. It’s difficult to see an animal with a treatable ailment get euthanized because the owner does not want to spend money. I understand euthanasia is part of the job and know that veterinarians cannot save them all, but it is unfortunate when an owner refuses to do what is best for their pet.
Why do you want to be a veterinarian?
I have always loved animals and I started to look into the career of vet medicine at an early age. I researched the career and volunteered, and was still not deturred, so I knew veterinary medicine was for me. I like seeing the bond between people and their pets, I think it is exciting how every day is different, and I am anxious to own my own business.
What type of veterinary medicine do you want to work in?
I would like to own a small animal practice with an emphasis on exotics. Dr. Minor jokes that she wants me to sign a letter of intent that I will work for her in my hometown of Dayton, NV.
What is your favorite leadership?
I really enjoy being an active member of the pre-vet club. I have really given my all to the club. I think you get out of it what you put into it–just like anything else. I liked planning the social activities and putting together 2 scrapbooks as the social chair, and I really enjoy organizing the officer meetings and ordering and selling the apparel as vice president. Though, staying positive when members get disgruntled can be difficult, I like trying to make the club fun for everyone.
What has been your greatest achievement thus far?
I am proud of all my volunteer hours. I made a concerted effort to not only clean kennels and stalls in a hospital environment, but to follow a veterinarian as much as possible. I succeeded in being one on one with a vet for 653 hours. In high school, I was rewarded with 8 scholarships, many rewarding me for my volunteer efforts.
What is your greatest strength?
You know, that since this is the 2nd time I have applied to vet school that I am very diligent. If something need to be done I will work at it until it is finished correctly.
What has been the greatest lesson from volunteer/job so far?
I understand that being a veterinarian takes a lot of time. I have worked 12 hour days, without lunch breaks, and I have seen my employers work 7 days a week for months at a time. I realize that veterinarians have to work long, hard hours from the time they graduate until retirement with very little time for recreation. I also know that it is one of the most rewarding jobs a person can have. I am excited to feel the sense of accomplishment of successfully treating a difficult case, and long to know the pride of having a good business because I have practiced meticulous and skillful medicine.
What is your biggest weakness?
I get impatient when I realize not every is going to work as hard as I do. I hate to see other students out drinking before big exams, workers lazing around instead of being productive, and people that do not give their full effort to a project.
What are your plans if you do not get in this year?
I will graduate with my animal science degree and chemistry minor in may, then work to get more animal experience. I plan to take anatomy from the vet school, then re-apply, branching out to vet schools at a national and world level.
What is a failure or disappointment and how did you deal with it?
Last year I did not get into vet school. Instead of getting discouraged and thinking my dreams of being a veterinarian were crushed, I made an effort to improve my application. I worked on my grades, got more animal experience, and worked on my interview skills. This year, I am supremely confident that I will get in!

Lots of Little Things

7 Jan

My future is on hold as I wait to hear from my (1) potential school. Again. And I only have 1 because the others just weren’t feasible. Either I couldn’t take my family–mate and cats (Seattle), or we couldn’t afford housing (everywhere), or there were no jobs (Idaho), or the moving expenses were too much because it was farther away (Kansas). So I’ve had to put all my eggs in one basket. Again.

But what do you do? I have to live within my finances and this is it. So I’m waiting, but trying to squeeze so many things into the time.

-Delve into my professional journals

-Prepare, plan, and PAY for the interview

-Get apprised of the general news

-Clean things out, organize, and pack

-organize school supplies and notes

-Read things I haven’t had time to finish (or start as the case may be)

-Cook

When I write it out, the list doesn’t seem overwhelming, but all those things do add up to a lot of time. So I’m trying to do lots of little things every day.  We’ll see how productive I can be.

I felt like I had more to say then this, but I guess that’s really it for now. . .  To flesh out the post, I’ll talk about what I learned about Hearing Aids and The Brain (journal article)

-Children have best results if they are implanted with their cochlear implant no later then their 1st birthday.  Cortical responses can differentiate neural signals initiated by an auditory signal from random noise.  In lay terms, Cortical Responses give information that a signal has proceeded through a device and is being interpreted by an infant’s brain.

-auditory evoked potentials can be used in pediatrics to estimate aided audibility, assess speech discrimination, and

-Hearing aids raise the sound, but also the noise-floor.  Altering signal to noise ratios can interfere w/biological codes that encode stimulus intensity level–which has implications for design of future hearing aids.

-People with hearing loss have to use working memory to understand auditory cues.

more toorrow–this article is MUCH longer than I thought.

Procrastinatee

12 Oct

As in:  I feel procrastinatee about several things right now, but maybe it’s tiredness?

-I agreed to transcribe language samples again this semester, yet have only done half of one.  And I keep moving the notification ahead on my calendar to-do list.  I agreed because my favorite professor asked me to.  Also, because I won’t be a student in the winter so I can’t do in then as I had intended.  But it’s harder then I remember, and things keep coming up.

-I would love to get my grad school application off my plate.  To have it finished, get it off the to-do list, and 11perhaps secure the best funding (is that a thing?) but I keep pushing that forward because it needs to be RIGHT.  I have to finish editing the essays and everything before I can get to this and they are not quite where I want them.  Plus, I don’t know for certain if early applications receive any extra deals or funding over the ones turned in on deadline (1-15-15).

-I need to edit and finish my personal statement.  I haven’t finished this up because it was suggested that I re-organize it entirely.  So it feels to me like instead of wrapping it up and just combing it for errors–I’m back in the middle of the writing process.  I want it done as best as possible, but now this stage requires more concentration then my studies and work schedule seemingly allow.

-I’m also procrastinatee about my scholarly paper.  But because I got good editing marks, that I need to read through and employ and I never seem to have a long chunk of time to do the whole thing.  I don’t want to get in the middle somewhere and have to remember which items I’ve corrected and which I still need to do.

superior-frontal viewBasically, it comes down to the fact that neuroanatomy takes a lot of my unscheduled time.  I have to make study materials for it-and study them.  And phonetics, even though I’ve used it a lot, has a billion tests (6 already) that I have to do practice for.  So it seems when I’m not actually scheduled to be somewhere, or doing the class stuff, I’m either sleeping, or too tired to focus enough.

Or Cool is a distraction.  Her moods are always up and down, meds always coming or going, or I just want to take advantage of the good days.  So that takes some concentration and attention away.  It’s a frustrating thing, but I think I’ll be caught in this loop until something gives–school semester (will hopefully be the thing).  I don’t want to jeopardize my grades trying to get this (mostly writing) stuff done.  When the semester is done I’ll really push to finish the writing and submit the application.

Job Descriptions 2005 or 2006?

3 Sep

Job Descriptions:
Small Animal
With Dr. Hulme, I was in charge of cleaning the exam tables, kennels, and the facilities. I also cared for animals by walking dogs and feeding. I aided the veterinarian by restraining animals, and held instruments such as the otiscope, for the doctor. I learned how to autoclave the surgery instruments, count and label medication, answer the phone, and write information in files. I observed dental cleanings, declaws, spays and neuters, and euthanasia.
I did everything for Dr. Minor that I had done for Dr. Hulme as well as some added jobs. I assisted with radiographs, eventually learning how to set our machine without measurements (we didn’t have any) and learned to develop the radiographs in our dip tank. I ran urinalysis and fecal floats, filled prescriptions, and performed pre-surgery blood panels. I also administered subcutaneous fluids, and glued due-claw removals. I learned how to prep for surgery as well as monitor anesthetic. I assisted with minor procedures (held puss pockets in pyometra surgery, injected atropine during a colonectomy, helped twist a rod in place during an orthopedic surgery). I was able to perform a prophy, helped drain an abscess, and was able to put a skin suture in my own cat’s abdomen after her spay. I observed third eyelid removal, pyometra, unblocking of feline urinary tract, a broken jaw wired together, tail amputation, and a blood transfusion.
Noah’s Ark Animal Hospital, hired me January of 2004. It is a four veterinarian small animal practice that also specializes in pocket pets and birds. I have some added responsibilities such as daily treatments (giving pills, oral liquids, and injectables, as well as force feeding). I also run diagnostics including gram stains, answer the phone, book appointments and boarding, and check clients in and out. I empty anal glands, do nail trims, draw blood for glucose curves, and generally help out where I am needed. I have been able to gain experience with small more exotic pets as well as with dogs and cats. I have force fed a chinchilla, trimmed bird nails and wings, restrained small and large birds, force fed ferrets, gave a turtle a baytril injection, and force fed a snake a pinky. I have observed Bulldog A.I., ultrasounds, and cesarean-sections.
I spent six hours one Saturday helping Dr. Terry Chapman vaccinate and Coggins test some horses. She vaccinated the horses for West Nile Virus, Eastern & Western Equine Encephalitis, and Influenza (tuberculosis). The Coggins test requires that about 3 mL of blood is taken to analyze for Equine Infectious Anemia. I was able to actually pull the blood and vaccinate most of the horses we worked with that day.
Horse-
I got a part-time job at Equine Medical Services this summer. My main responsibilities are cleaning stalls, bedding, feeding, watering, and medicating (oral and on feed) the horses. I have helped unload and load hoses in the trailers, catch horses for their pregnancy checks, and walk horses to paddocks. I also help clean the six barns and maintain the facilities.
Dairy Cows-
One of the grad students, Julie, hired me to care for dairy cattle being used for heat stress research, in the latter part of 2003. Rectal, tail-head, shoulder, and hip temperatures as well as the respiration rate of 18 cows had to be taken four times a day. We milked the cows at 4 am and 4pm every day, which entailed sanitizing the milking equipment, milking, and re-sanitizing the milking equipment. I also helped feed and bed the animals and clean their stalls. Since it was a research project meticulous recorded on the cows had to be kept. The temperatures and respiration rates were recorded as well as the feed intake and output of each cow. I drew blood from under a cow’s tail and observed a biopsy while I was working with the project.
Pigs-
Dr. Greg and Terry Chapman took me to Washington, MO for 8 hours one Saturday, to see their friends Bob and Dottie Brinker who have a hog farm. I learned about the daily responsibilities of running a swine operation by walking around the farm for eight hours. During my visit, Bob told me about the necessary vaccinations, breeding procedure, and swine flow through the facility.
Research Monkey-
Dr. Sharp, our relief doctor, took me to his other job at Sierra Biomedical (Charles River Laboratories, Sparkes, NV), a research facility. For 8 hours I was able to follow Dr. Sharp on his rounds. He checked the feces of Cynomologus macaqus, Recess, and Marmosets to check for gastrointestinal problems. He changed food and prescribed medication as necessary. He also looked for gross lesions and possible research-ending health problems by the groups. I was even able to remove sutures from a monkey as Dr. Sharp held it. At the end of the day, I got to go into the common area and feed the monkeys graham crackers. It was extremely interesting to see the higharchy in the different cages.
Wolves-
I observed Dr. Minor working with wolves. I went and saw her vaccinate many wolves, and when one of the female wolves was very sick, she came to the veterinary hospital for two weeks. We gave the wolf supportive care and eventually euthanized her.
Exotics-
I was able to volunteer with Deb T at D-D Animal Sanctuary, where I bottle-fed a calf, swept out a tiger enclosure and a cougar enclosure, carried bales of hay across a field, and put straw on the floor of enclosures.
Down Under Diner-
Register, Hand out food, Make food, Clean back, Inventory
I learned:
People skills, Teamwork, Mental math, Sanitation, Food preparation, Heavy lifting, Deciphering patterns of speech, Accents, Soft voices

I’m Focused, I’m Ready–I Can DO This!

19 Aug

OK, I wrote this 2 weeks ago, then thought it might be jinxy.  I’ve saved it since then, and a lot has changed.  I’ll add updated things (with an *) along side.

Here I go, I’m doing this!  Writing a bulleted (dashed, actually) post.

-I actually nailed my interview today.  The guy on the phone turned out to be no more than 22 years old and was a manager.  There was also a (regular?) man who was head of the division there.  I always feel like things should really fall into place and FEEL right, and somehow this didn’t.  The timing was weird, the first exchange awkward–so I didn’t have super-good feelings about it.  And since I felt like this wasn’t really meant to be I wasn’t nervous last night and this morning like I usually am.  This carried over to the pre-interview wait (usually terrible nerve-wracking) and surprisingly the interview itself.  It’s the first real  (veterinary shenanigans/work-interviews/and 1 question fast food not counted) interview that I feel great about.  The rest I either got really nervous or didn’t do a good job, or self-sabotaged b/c the job wasn’t right.  In this one I could tell both really liked me and I’m thinking I just may be offered the job.

*PS I found out 12 days later I got the job!

-Which, I know I could do a wonderful job for this organization so why wouldn’t they?  Not arrogance, but realism talking here.

*They even said so–it’s not just me.  What can I say, I’m a wonderful cleaner 😉

-I hesitate to write this in a public forum (before actually getting a firm offer), but the prospect of getting the job makes me a little nervous.  Just because I in no way want to overextend myself and lose my 4.0 GPA.  I have neuroanatomy this semester, you know.  Also, it may not leave me time to clean the vet hospital, tutoring at school, observing, or extra projects.  Which I have to decide how important any of those really are to me. . .

*The 2nd thing I did when I found out was write my boss to pick a time to meet so I could resign my cleaning position at the vet hospital.  Working til midnight, then getting up at 3-4AM, then going to school would just overextend me and I don’t want to set myself up for failure (or B’s even).

-Also, it would be evening/night hours and I am a decidedly morning person so I would have to flip-flop my whole routine.

*God, I stayed up til 9:30PM last night and I felt lie I was gonna die all day today.  And now I have the telltale sign of a sore throat that I’m trying to get sick (from lack of sleep).

-On the other hand, the organization is something I can get behind, the work is something I can readily do, it’s a national place so potential for keeping the job as I move state to state in the future is high, and the free membership would be exceptional.  Also, ability to buy things and to save money would be big perks.

-Fixing Rusty’s starter, buying my textbook, and maybe *crosses fingers* even buying a pair of boots would be really cool also.

* The FIRST thing I did when I found out was call the auto shop and make an appointment to get Rusty’s starter fixed and oil changed.  This has needed to happen since April, but I didn’t want to drop a chunk of change when I didn’t know when I would ean more.

-To alleviate my worries, I tried to make a potential schedule to see how much time I have and what my fall semester might be like.  But not knowing exactly how many hours, what days, or what blocks of time are acceptable, I quickly got stuck.  I estimated, but without the data it’s pretty meaningless.

*I asked for (and received) my hours concentrated on Friday and Saturday when I don’t have class.  This way I can recuperate before school and have time to study during the week.

-In other news, I tried to see how many steps I take in a mile.  It largely depended on my speed–faster I went, the shorter my stride length.  Which I hear is not ideal for increasing speed.  Science suggests increasing stride length and frequency of steps.  I’ll have to work on that.

*It depends on my speed.  BUT I have a post about the formula and my numbers coming up.

*My FitBit battery is so crazy/stupid that some days I want to throw the device in the river.  Even though when it works I love it.

-Oh, I almost forgot the point of telling you that last one:  I was looking of the science articles about stride length and speed, and I liked the conclusion one article came up with:  Ideally, you should both increase stride length and frequency of steps.  But most people have a hard time doing that, and favor one technique over the other.  This article said that you should know both.  Use one stride length at the beginning of your race, then when you become fatigued switch to the opposite.  What this does is work slightly different muscles–which aren’t fatigued.  This allows you to really give a kick at the end of your race.  This makes a lot of sense to me, and maybe I’ll try some things out to employ it.

-You also have to work out to increase strength (stride length), do drill work to increase neuromuscular connectivity speeds (faster turnover).  Instead of reaching forward to have a longer stride–which seems logical–push off harder with your feet, or ideally spend more time with both feet off the ground (an explosion of forward momentum).  As with everything, getting faster starts to have a lot to do with form, fitness, and physics = math.  I think to get more PRs though, I’m at this point.

-Our apartment is cheap and 4-5 on the vertical blinds broke off.  Upon close inspection the plastic hook broke into a n-shape, probably from all the heat, just dropping the blind out.  So I had to thread fishing line over the apparatus and tie it to the blinds.  I don’t think anyone will inspect them close enough to notice the difference.

*the fishing line blinds are still holding up nicely.  I think those are actually sturdier then the ones held with cheap plastic.  And I think the cheap plastic cooking in the sun is what wore the other ones out-lame.

-I went through the trouble:  1] to actually have closed blinds 2] to block heat in summer and drafts/cold in winter 3] to avoid a charge when we move out.

-It’s funny what I procrastinate about.  Making ice cream has been put off for over a week, even though I already did the difficult part and boiled the fruit into a syrup.  Painting my toe nails has been put off because I don’t want to remove the old polish.  It stinks and it requires scrubbing.  Making a new clogging dance for the talent show.  Because I can’t find a perfect song and only remember the steps I used in last year’s routine–this also needs to be a show-stopper!

*Finally, I buckled down and decided to finish the ice cream and lo and behold–when I pulled the bowl of mixture out from the freezer, the ice cream had made itself without my intervention!  Why can’t all procrastination items go this way?  I did remove the polish.  Which is creepy, and makes my teeth hurt.  And I re-painted them–but avoided glitter so it would be much easier to remove next time.

-I am getting SO excited about the Gorge!  I am looking up recipes, virgin drinks, and thinking about my setlist game, car-window paint and phrases, and a sign!  It’s gonna be a good, good time 😀

*We got car crayons and decided on slogans.  I cut up a box for a poster and we picked lyrics and made a model.  My setlist game is locked in.  Outfits picked.  I practiced one (of 2) hairstyles tonight and it worked out–though I need hairspray for those hairs I know are gray b/c og their unruliness.  We did the grocery shopping for all the snacks and bevs.  We even made banana bread (in the blender = genius!) and it’s in the freezer ready to grab.  I am super-excited.  These concerts have superseeded the first day of school, which is not right, but it’s happened.

-School–as I told my dad, I’m prepared, but not excited.  I mean who’s excited to lose their free time and begin studying every free moment?  Who’s excited to have to start to leave the house every day?  Who’s excited for stress?  I’m not insane.  But hopefully, my studying is so habitual and rehearsed by now that it will be much less of a big deal to do what I need to do.  Just one more semester here!

-My face is (still) breaking out like I’m going through puberty.  I use 2% sa. . .  chemical I forgot, not benz. . .  chemical I can’t remember, which dries out my face, but doesn’t stop the break outs.  The Sa. . .  is a little better, but I still regularly break out.  I am also on BCP for the last 4-5-6? months.  Maybe I should shower immediately after my workouts.  That might be a problem.  I’m sure my diet is also a problem, but that’s much more difficult to get motivated to change.

-I’m mad that I have to calculate my own GPA for my application.  Mad because they also make me send official transcripts–which cost money.  And I have to send them from 3 colleges, ramping up the headache (WSU already charged me twice for 1 set) and money (see previous parentheses).  I think they hire the dumbest, most belligerent people to handle the university fax machine–I always have trouble.

-I had specific questions about the GPA calculation that the school has to answer and that wasn’t on their info website.  So I e-mailed the address given on the admissions home page given to request information.  They did not address my questions at all, told me to refer to their website, and gave me a link to nowhere.  It was super-annoying, and I really had to stop myself from complaining for the lack of service–you never know who is in charge of your future.

*I had to make a phone call.  I did not like it.  All of my questions got answered and I calculated all my GPAs.

-I suppose it’s unprofessional to quit a job over Facebook, e-mail, text, or phone?  I would not be excited to go do it in person. . .  How about by letter?  I really do not want to do that–if it comes to that at all, I don’t know that it will.

*I wrote a Facebook message asking what the preferred mode of communication for the next 2 days would be.  I’m sure that gave away my intent right away.  Of course, my boss preferred a phone call.  I had to make a phone call.  I did not like it.  I resigned and the conversation was more pleasant and longer than I had anticipated.

-I have been researching textbook buy-back prices and will write a blog about when the best and worst times are.  With a graph!  Because I’m trying to hit the peak, I’m hesitant to sell my book back.  For fear it’s too early and the price will peak the next day/week/month.  As such, I still have my book that could give me a little income.  Also, the flaw in my plan is in order to find the peak, you have to see the downward progression that comes afterward–meaning I have to wait for the price to DROP again, to know (and miss) when the highest price was.

-I’m debating selling the mini fridge.  It’s really infuriating me by freezing or randomly thawing if the dial is breathed on.  It’s a royal pain to clean sticky, melty, smelly old stuff off a frozen bottom–and out from under the fridge.  Problem is, or freezer is really small and inept and doesn’t accommodate all the stuff we want.  BUT if I’m to sell/get a good price on the mini–this is the season to do it.  when all the students are setting up their dorms or wanting a kegerator.  After the decision, it’s also a labor-intensive job–which also has gone on my procrastination list.  Clean it, defrost it, write a nice ad, deal with FlakesList, and possibly help haul it out. . .

*I also stopped procrastinating and finally emptied the mini fridge.  We carried it to the balcony and let it defrost overnight.  I then bleached the $%ER out of it and washed all its contents.  While I did that I rearranged the kitchen (including 2 cupboards) to make more counter space.  Took forever and was tedious.  The fridge is in a new place getting cool as we speak.  It looks nicer in here, things make better logistical sense, and there is more space.  It was tedious. . .

-We watched the final season of the L-Word on Sunday.  I had seen the previous 5 seasons, but not this one.  So I’m a bad lesbian for not knowing who the heck killed Jenny and by being 10-12 (?) years behind the times.  I thought the season was consistent with the others.  I screamed at the immorality of the characters in the same way I always have.  The only difference I saw was before the intro song they had a scene in which each character in turn had a bad-scene with Jenny and subsequently said they wanted to kill her.  And I thought that was entertaining.  Also, despite liking the way Jenny provoked everyone and moved the plot along, I think that’s bad writing.  Every character should have at least one redeeming quality, and they didn’t leave Jenny with ANY.  But I loved to hate her anyway.

-SPOILER ALERT–the thing nobody liked was the way the network and show made “Who Killed Jenny” the central point in the entire last season–then left you in the dark at the end.  They never directly say.  I didn’t think the finale sucked though–I thought everything was as tied up as it could be.  One forum-respondant put it nicely when they said, “when acquaintances come in and out of our real lives, we don’t get updates.”  And another who said, “We are allowed an intimate view of this friend-group’s lives, yet we are not part of their inner group–the finale and secret of who, if anyone, killed Jenny is a reminder of that.”  Personally I think everyone had motive, but nobody actually did it.  I think she was always on the edge and committed suicide.

-PS–TV series writers it’s lame to leave an open ending on a finale as a segway to your next project–especially if that spin-off never comes to fruition.  Finish the one entirely–for the viewers–then move into the next thing.

-Do not watch “Don Juan.”  I thought it was horrible based on it’s treatment of women throughout.  Awful.

-I told myself to sleep in til 4AM since I had an interview at 10:45AM, but my body got up at 3:15AM anyway.  So now I’m very tired and as a result–unproductive.  Which I really hate.  I should either be able to sleep or do things I need to do.  It’s not fair of my body to be too tired to do the things, but not be able to sleep.

Is this long enough to be a decent real-time post?  I want to make up my slacking, readers!

*It is now certainly too long.  Enjoy the last 2 weeks of my life.

Experience 2006 [Another One]

9 Aug

What can I say?  I applied to 10 different schools at various times so I have written a lot of these essays.  And I’m tired right now so you get to see yet another one.  I’m sure they’re beginning to look similar. . .

prevet 041

Gaining experience with a variety of species has helped me become more competent with different species. I am now comfortable in many arenas of veterinary medicine.

Seattle zoo turtleI observed many veterinarians in small animal practice. I have assisted with radiographs, setting our machine without a measurement chart and developing the radiographs in a dip tank. I ran urinalysis and fecal floats, filled prescriptions, performed pre-surgery blood panels, administered subcutaneous fluids, and glued due-claw removals. I have trimmed bird nails and wings, gave a turtle a Baytril injection, and force fed a chinchilla, ferrets, and a snake. I can prepare for surgery as well as monitor anesthetic. I assisted with minor procedures (held puss pockets in pyometra surgery, injected atropine during a colonectomy, twisted a rod in place during an orthopedic surgery). I was able to perform a prophy, helped drain an abscess, and put a skin suture in my own cat’s abdomen after her spay. I observed third eyelid removal, unblocking of feline urinary tract, a broken jaw wired together, amputations, a blood transfusion, artificial insemination, ultrasounds, and cesarean-sections.

I have an array of large animal experiences. I worked at Equine Medical Services, Inc. where my responsibilities were gallopcleaning stalls, bedding, feeding, and medicating the horses. I caught horses for various purposes as well. I have also gone out with Dr. Chapman to vaccinate and pull blood for Coggins tests. Dr. Chapman took me to observe a swine operation for eight hours. I also went to Fishers Hog Farm for six hours. I learned a lot of intricacies of raising hogs. My large animal experience also includes working on a research project that studied heat stress in dairy cows. I recorded temperatures and respiration rates, monitored cows for signs of mastitis, fed, and cleaned the cows. I also milked the cows at 4 AM and 4 PM. I was able to draw blood from the tail vein and observe a liver biopsy.

pygmy_like_da_bananaMy experience with exotic animals consists of observing Dr. Minor vaccinate wolves, volunteering at D-D Animal Sanctuary with the large cats, and accompanying Dr. Sharp on his rounds at Charles River Laboratories. He checked stools of the Cynomolgus macaques, Cynomolgus rhesus, and marmosets, looked for lesions and possible research-ending health problems, and prescribed medication. I was able to remove sutures from one of the monkeys and feed crackers to the monkeys in the group pens.

The animal experience I have gained has proven invaluable. I am more familiar with a variety of species and veterinary practice in general. I have realized through experience, veterinary medicine is definitely the career I want to have.

July Goal Accountability

31 Jul

Maintenance Goals (from 2013):

-floss daily. A-

I was compelled to do this all the time, and feel really icky if I don’t.  The only problem arose when we were traveling.  It’s pretty hard to fit it in logistically.  But it’s not as if we go places constantly, so this should work out.  I have organized 2 showers over Labor Dave, so I make sure and floss while I’m using the bathroom.  Friday, I’ll probably do it in the morning before we go.

-drink water. A

IF I drink it early in the day, this is easily done.  But if I don’t–it’s very difficult.  And even though I’m trying to get it in, Kidron's post b-day pics 069making the choice between 8 cups and peeing all night is bad-times.  In August I’ll try to drink all 4 after I work out while I’m taking my vitamins.  That should help.

-read for pleasure. B+

I finished my WA poaching book and have started one on the Comstock and Virginia City–which is very interesting so far.  I wish I could have finished more, but I’m doing it every week night that we’re not traveling.

-weekly massage. FFF

It had been NONE.  Because the rubs were terrible.  And short.  So I didn’t even want to bother–especially if I was the only one putting in any effort.  We had a massage afternoon, and the quality was better, I’m relieved to say.  I guess Cool’s meds made her too much of a zombie to rub, but now it’s nice again.  So in August we’ll try to resume at least a weekly basis.

-abstain from drinking. D+ (didn’t, but my head was in the right place)

The German by Laurel 009I don’t want this to sound like I’m making excuses or justifying my actions, because this really wasn’t a “thing.”  When we had initially looked at Missoula, it was because of all the breweries in the area.  But when we actually visited, we were slightly disappointed, but still had a really good time and weren’t really focused on drinking.  Except on Saturday, I saw an amazing pair of Old Gringo boots that looked so stellar on me and that I would kill for!  The price tag was $100 cheaper than I’ve seen them anywhere else.  Needless to say they were still $300, and that’s too much for an unemployed person.  But I wanted them so badly!  And really had to make an extreme effort to stop myself from buying them.  So I made a deal with myself to share 1, small $5 kraft beer in lieu of spending $300 on a beautiful pair of boots.  It was a sort of naughty trade off–but a lot cheaper.  And I asked the waitress to substitute the pint of beer on the menu for something smaller, and did share it.  My portion was 5 oz.  It was good, but not the be-all end all I remembered.  And that’s it til at least January 2nd of 2015, and maybe for good, I don’t know.

-study habits. C-

Well, I have been getting things done, yes.  I read/outlined all my neuroanatomy for the semester, started drawing the figures (and completed 12?), made and even memorized some flashcards for both classes, made progress on my personal statement, almost finished my CV, and have a draft of my scholarly paper.  But I also know I’m not in the right mindset, and I’m able to accomplish even more.  I’m torn between buckling down too early and risking burning out, and finishing a lot of things before fall begins.  In August I’ll work on getting my application as complete as possible (hopefully finished in its entirety) so I don’t have to stress out about it while trying to keep the 4.0 GPA.  I’d at least like everything at the point where I could turn it in if I wanted to, so then I can optionally tinker on it–or have it ready.

January=fitness. A

Today (the 26th) was my 206th day in a row of running at least a mile.  Even with travel this month I managed to get it in.  Montana was difficult because a bear was seen walking about, and I had to do it in the hotel room.  But when we visited Cool’s mom we easily did it up her residential street.  I’m trying to RE-introduce pseudo-hula-hoop back into my routine, because it’s the BEST 6-pack maker and I want to look super-hot for Labor Dave weekend.  It’s going–slowly.  The closer we get to the event, the more I’m buckling down and doing it like I should.

Feb=have gratitude; say nice things. D

Here’s an example of why this one is difficult:  My boss writes to me telling me to take the trash outside after I scoop the litter boxes.  Which I hadn’t been because (as other stories have illustrated) the clinic isn’t in the greatest neighborhood in the off-hours.  And I’m there between 3-6AM when it’s dark and no one else is around.  So I don’t feel super-safe going out behind the clinic to the larger trash bins.  Also, it didn’t really occur to me, because the years I worked as an assistant it was a nightly duty to collect all the trash in the building and take it outside–which I did pretty much the entire tenure of my work.  So it’s not a really big deal, and I could see why she asked me, but she added, “How is your summer of leisure going?”  Not popular.  Even if she thinks I’m a lazy-ass.  She shouldn’t write it.  I’m doing productive things–and my productivity is none of her business anymore.  So it’s very hard to say nice things, be positive, and have gratitude when it’s offensive/coarse.  Fail, and now that I’m going back to Riverpoint with notoriously crabby professors, I’m going to have to work much harder on this one.

March=straighten out sleep. A-

It’s better, so, so much better!  I stopped fighting my natural inclination to wake at 3AM.  This has actually worked out better for me, b/c instead of trying to go back to sleep–or lightly sleeping for an hour.  I just go to work.  Then, I’m back home in the 5AMs when I can still nap.  Even though I go to bed at 9PM, I am not super tired or fatigued!  Though they must think I’m INSANE when they look at my time clock and it says 3AM to 5AM.  Hopefully, my safety never comes into play, as I think this is the one area of the plan that could be troublesome.

April=save $$$. F+ (+ b/c I haven’t lost my motivation/guilt)

I rarely spent money–because there isn’t any I feel comfortable spending.  But I didn’t get a job (despite a few interviews) Gorge Ampitheatre 3and didn’t offer to miss Labor Dave Weekend SEATS to house-sit, missing out on big, easy money.  Which I feel sad missing out on the opportunity, but also feel it’s the right decision.  We got those tickets in February, as a reward for not drinking, and 1 ticket was purchased by my parents for an early birthday gift.  And we look forward to it all year–but still the timing is unfortunate.  And lack of income.  August will be worse, because I HAVE to buy some school supplies and a textbook.  And of course WILL get a Labor Dave outfit–at least one article, and probably definitely merch at the show.  Hopefully, this next interview comes through so I don’t have to worry about my loan money stretching far enough.

May=volunteer. D+ (I did school-related presentations)

interactive hearing anatomy 2Fail.  At least for community.  In regards to voluntary school-related activities I did more than any other student in my program.  But I did nothing at all even to pursue wider community-type service.  And this would be cool.  I may have decided it’s not super-important to me right now though.  I am undecided, but maybe I’ll focus on finding a job, school, tutoring, school-related presentations, my application, and as an extra–observing an audiologist.  It somehow seems like a lot, though I’m unemployed.  I’ll re-evaluate once school resumes.

June=Cool. C-

My focus is on more important matters, so fail–but not.  Because I’m offering support and responsibility.  She’s off the horrible medication, and doesn’t need to go back on unless she swings up or down.  So things are much, much better and she has enough energy to act like a person rather than the zombie she had turned into.  But then she decided to go off her antidepressant as well, and as a result–she has started showing signs of depression.  It’s always something.  Which when managing medications/responsibility/crises/medication/responsibility it gets tough to stick to this goal and have any time or energy left to show affection.  Hopefully this is not always going to be the case because she’s bipolar. . .

July=my appearance. B+

I have been trying to dress cute and look cute, applied makeup, and even dyed my hair–more on that tomorrow.  I still regularly forget to wear jewelry.  I’ll really have to step my game up in August for these big, upcoming events.

Aug=Worry Less, Thank more. C-

OK, but I can do better.  I totally forgot my positivity jar–which I think is an excellent idea.  I’m going to try to remember to notice and write more for it.  And I do say things I’m thankful for immediately before going to sleep–but I’m sleeping a lot better these days, so it doesn’t last nearly as long as before.  I think I get to 2, maybe 4 things before I’m out.  And overall I am so proud of me because I worry substantially less.  And it’s really, super nice.  If I could keep it this way it would be so awesome!

Sept=make a list, grocery shop, cook ahead. F-

Terrible, absolutely horrible.  Failed so bad.  My computer app changed it up and made itself a recipe site with no more menu–which was the point.  I’m thinking maybe a white board would help me scene.  Paper lists are hard because if we get Green Bluff 101tired, run out of an ingredient, the weather is too hot, etc… it’s a pain to change things.  Making it easy as possible to write, then edit the menu as necessary would be best.  I’m great at making a grocery list, but need to get on the menu, weekly shopping, and actual preparing of things.  Total.  Fail.  Have you ever seen 2 people that can go a summer without actually cooking?  I grab whatever I can stuff in my mouth quickly (wheat thins, dried fruit. . .  OK ice cream) and don’t bother.  But it’s bad, and HAS to change!

Oct=don’t over-pluck. C

I still want to try the Indian method.  I still want to try lightening them.  For now I’m unsatisfied, but leaving them alone as much as I can make myself.

Nov=Increase eye contact. F+ (+ for lack of opportunity)

Fail.  Now it’s operation look at service people in the eye, because they are really the only ones I see at all.

Colorado is Awesome!

30 Jul

I want my loyal readers to know I plan to write a sequel to “Veterinary Medicine is for Spoiled Rich Girls.”  For example, I realize the term “rich” is a subjective one, and also that 2, 3, 7 different people will have varying experiences, which cannot be equalized or made factual in any meaningful way.  In the sequel I plan to find some data to back up or refute my first claims (which I still believe strongly because that was MY first-hand experience).  Maybe I’ll supplement it with more specific stories and incidents, maybe not.  It might just be data.  Oh, and I retract the word “girls.”  I don’t like it any more, and it sounds demeaning in a way I hadn’t intended.  Alas, I’ve been frantically trying to finish all my application materials before the semester starts so I don’t have much left in me when it comes to frivolous writing just yet.  Soon though.

What I can do before I retire to bed, is share with you an article about Colorado.  I’m still excited, but now it feels a world away.  With the change of plan moving us toward Salt Lake rather than Greeley, the excitement has receded.  It’s the right decision, but a little sad that our grown-up lives are still so out of reach.  Just 5 more years of being a starving student.  Like these last it’s sure to pass in the blink of an eye.  I guess I’m holding on to the saying “the time will pass either way” or some close approximation to that–can you tell I’ve been writing essays the majority of the day?  So Without further adu, something to keep the dream fresh:

Denver

THE BEST…
Public parks and outdoor access (#1)

This is great–we want to be outdoor enthusiasts and healthy, so this was be inspirational.

CO Parks and Wildlife
Athletic/active (#1)

We can remain motivated to stay in shape and active!

Bike Town
Easy-going (#1)

Great for me, great for Cool’s bipolar and generalized anxiety, and awesome for employment (working with the public).

Old Town Hot Springs--Steamboat Springs
Microbrew beer (#2)

Maybe we will one day take advantage of this again.

oskarblues in Longmont
Professional sports (#2)

Yay!  We love festivity.  Now if they could only get a WNBA team.

CO vs WA 2014

THE WORST…
Charming local accent (#28)

Who cares.
Cool souvenirs (#25)

Again, so what?
Ethnic food (#23)

Don’t trust it, don’t crave it.

How to Chose a Focus or Angle for the Personal Statement

17 Jul

I am sort of on hold with my personal statement as I wait for editing.  You know, making changes while a version is out for review might make things more difficult.  I’d have to piece together my new changes with their input, and this wastes valuable time.  While I wait, I’m not sitting here doing nothing!  Aside from focusing on other projects (CV, neuroanatomy reading, outlining, figures, and tables, flash cards and running) I’m thinking about how to make my personal statement reflect ME.  It not only has to tell a great story of inspiration, career knowledge, and future research/career direction, but has to convey traits about my personality that I want the admissions committee to know.  Mainly–WHY the topics within my personal statement are important to me and how they shape me as a future professional.  In short, this hiatus is the thinking portion of the show. . .  These are great tips for my statement when I get this last version back:

 

STEP ONE

Begin to focus your thoughts by examining your actual experiences. Use the information you’ve uncovered through brainstorming to address the following topics.

• An achievement that made me feel terrific…

• Something I have struggled to overcome or change about myself or my life…

• An event or experience that taught me something special…

• A “real drag” of an experience that I had to get past…

• Someone’s act of strength or courage that affected me…

• A family experience that influenced me in some powerful way…

• A lesson, class project, activity or job that had an impact on my academic or career goals…

• A time I blew it, failed, made bad choices, and how I got past it…

• Some memorable event or advice involving an older person…

• An event that helps to define me, in terms of my background…

STEP TWO

Choose one or two of your favorite respones from the list above (or combine a couple that evoked similar responses). Check to make sure your written description addresses the following three questions. If it doesn’t, add details so that the experience you describe will be vivid to a reader who doesn’t know you.

1. What were the key moments and details of the event?

2. What did I learn from this event?

3. What aspect of this event stays with me most?

STEP THREE

Decide on a theme for your essay. Taking the experience you wrote about in Step Two, answer the following questions:

•What does this event reveal about me?

•What makes it special or significant?

•How does this event make me special or make me stand out?

• What truth about me is revealed through this event?

-Here are some tips to consider when choosing an experience to evaluate for a focus:

  • It should be unique. It does not have to be life shattering, but you should be able to write about it with conviction, enthusiasm and authority.
  • It should be an experience you feel some passion for. You must be able to support it as a “turning point” in your life. Ask yourself, “How did I change as a result of this experience?” For example, did it give you a new perspective or understanding, did it give you a new direction in life, or help you come to an important realization?
  • Don’t limit yourself to thinking of experiences that can translate well into the moral of ” . . . and that’s why I want to be a doctor.” Choose something that you feel is truly representative of you, and something that you feel you can use to transition to other relevant aspects of your life. Otherwise, your statement may come off sounding staged or strained.
  • It should be sustainable throughout your statement. In other words it has to have enough depth and flexibility to carry you through your statement while avoiding repetition. The details of the event should afford you opportunity to talk about related experiences that you want the people who are considering your for an interview to know.
  • Of course, you don’t want to use up too much of your limited space just setting a scene. Make sure your frame serves multiple purposes:
    • It introduces the occasion of the focus
    • It introduces you
    • It is creative enough to spark interest in the rest of your statement

    By framing the statement with an anecdote, you provide your audience with immediate access to some aspect of your past, your character, and your personality. Also, you give them incentive to read on to find our what happens next.