Tag Archives: dysphagia

(Half of a) Dysphagia Goal Essay

15 Mar

If I couldn’t get on the Audiology career path, my first choice in SLP avenues would be dysphagia.  As such, I had levator veli palatini 2started brainstorming an admissions essay for the SLP-graduate program here.  I have subsequently decided that I will not be applying to Riverpoint’s graduate school as a back-up plan.  I don’t like the ethos at this school, and wouldn’t want to suffer through two more years, seeing even MORE of these instructors.  I don’t love their attitudes about student communication.  It may become a back-up option when we get to Colorado though.  Depending on how my Audiology acceptance goes. . .  So I’ll abandon this one and save it for a rainy day.  Or never *crosses fingers*

SLP:
-dysphagia
-include vet observation & diagnostics

Talk about watching the equine endoscopies and how interesting the diagnostic processes were to me. Also mention how I have taken, developed, and viewed radiographs for that last 13.5 years in small animal veterinary hospitals.

-Talk about my mom’s Indian fry bread and tacos and explain that food is often foundational to retaining culture.

snake dance 4I have enjoyed fry bread sopping with honey and butter since I can remember. Unfortunately, because of all the poverty on the Flathead Reservation that contains my people, there is not a lot of Salish pride. As a result, many of the traditions have been lost to assimilation and survivalist mentalities. One stronghold on the culture, that remains is our food. Early settlers may have forced Native Americans to burn their regalia, stop dancing, and neglect their language, but they could not take away our food. The recipes were memorized, and handed down from tribal elders, to mothers, and now to me. It is a link to my heritage that I would not want to imagine losing. Thinking about a life where I could not partake in the sticky, fluffiness that is Indian Fry Bread seems bleak. That is why I want to work with dysphagia patients–to help them retain and enjoy the foods central to their culture.  Again and more.

beadwork

-why am I interested in this?

I’m interested in dysphhagia because it blends my love of cuisine with my compassion for others. I love food and can’t imagine the joy that is sheared away if you were not able to enjoy eating or had a fear of choking. I would enjoy using my creativity to come up with delicious, but practical foods for people who are having difficulty eating.
-who do I want to help?

I want to help any age person that is frustrated with changing their diet, eating a limited vareity of foods, or has a fear of eating things they enjoy because of their health. Sharing my passion for food and coming up with meals the patient not only can adjust to, but is excited to eat are my career goals.

snake dance colored pencil

Key vocab words:

-multifarious-having many different parts, elements, forms; numerous & varied; highly diverse

-abate-reduce in amt degree sevrity

-anodyne- something that calms/soothes pain

-ardor-intense & passionate feeling

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SLP back-up Goal Essay [+ a little randomness]

13 Dec

My day was OK.  I suppose I’m never happy satisfied at the end because there is always so much I want to accomplish and only so many hours (and energy) in which to do it.  I made it to work by 5:30AM and cheerfully hustled around until 10AM.  Though going in early like that makes me tired, I think of it as relatively easy money.  It’s time that I can clean, restock, care for the clinic cats, participate in patient care–and not have the social aspect that can drag me down.  Today, the social aspect was agreeable, but it’s the thing that has the potential to upset me most.

I don’t don’t where I was going with that.  I was writing to say I wish I outlined more of my Audiometry.  I did pinna 4do a LOT.  I’m not sure how much, because this time I’m taking a more skitzophrenic approach.  I have a hard time getting through an entire textbook in 1 month, and it’s impossible to guess which chapters the syllabus will address first.  So rather then going linear, or trying to guess the most important chapters, I’m writing headings, then defining, then reading and outlining until my brain gets tired.  That way I’m hitting a lot of chapters, at least familiarizing with most of them, and never getting too fatigued over one subject area.  I like it better.  And if I don’t finish–I’ll at least have skimmed most of the things.

I’m not very pleased that this left little time for future grad school application procedures or scholarship essays.  I have the weekend, and maybe I’ll put those up front more.  The scholarship app is due in a mere 2 weeks, so I need to really get a lot more serious about it.  Below, is one of the topics I’m going to work on.  Here’s a very rough outline of what I’m thinking about (in purple):

Oh, and I ran/hiked on the treadmill today, and that feels great.  If I’m not too sore I’ll do some tomorrow too.

SLP:
-dysphagia
-include vet observation & diagnostics

Talk about watching the equine endoscopies and how interesting the diagnostic processes were to me.  Also mention how I have taken, developed, and viewed radiographs for that last 13.5 years in small animal veterinary hospitals.

-why am I interested in this?

I’m interested in dysphhagia because it blends my love of cuisine with my compassion for others.  I love food and can’t imagine the joy that is sheared away if you were not able to enjoy eating or had a fear of choking.  I would enjoy using my creativity to come up with delicious, but practical foods for people who are having difficulty eating.
-who do I want to help?

I want to help any age person that is frustrated with changing their diet, eating a limited vareity of foods, or has a fear of eating things they enjoy because of their health.  Sharing my passion for food and coming up with meals the patient not only can adjust to, but is excited to eat are my career goals.

Key vocab words:

-multifarious-having many different parts, elements, forms; numerous & varied; highly diverse

-abate-reduce in amt degree sevrity

-anodyne-  something that calms/soothes pain

-ardor-intense & passionate feeling

Writing plan options to incorporate the above:

-Tell about the best meal of my life, at Elemental and how everyone should be able to enjoy food.

Everyone knows on your birthday you get a special meal of your choice.  I knew I would only live in a real city for one year of my life, so I chose a restaurant that embodied the Seattle mentality-Elemental.  The location was right off beautiful Lake Union.  Situated in a complex of condos, the restaurant was so nondescript, without even a sign that my dining companion and I had to ask the UPS driver where to go.  We entered the stark white room and lingered by the front door, not sure of the procedure.

After being asked about allergies, our first plate came looking like it had been prepared on The Food Network.  The portions were tiny, yet elegantly garnished.  The smells emanating from the dish ensured freshness of ingredients, the colors vibrant.  The textures were a varied tapestry of deliciousness, with crunchy sweetness, smooth richness, and fluffy tartness.

-Describe a special occasion and show how many holidays and events revolve around food.

What would Independence Day be without a bar-b-que?  The smell of the hotdogs, and bubbles against my tongue from a cold beer help make the occasion special.  

ribs, brats, hot dogs; beer

-Talk about my mom’s Indian fry bread and tacos and explain that food is often foundational to retaining culture.

snake dance 4I have enjoyed fry bread sopping with honey and butter since I can remember.  Unfortunately, because of all the poverty on the Flathead Reservation that contains my people, there is not a lot of Salish pride.  As a result, many of the traditions have been lost to assimilation and survivalist mentalities.  One stronghold on the culture, that remains is our food.  Early settlers may have forced Native Americans to burn their regalia, stop dancing, and neglect their language, but they could not take away our food.  The recipes were memorized, and handed down from tribal elders, to mothers, and now to me.  It is a link to my heritage that I would not want to imagine losing.  Thinking about a life where I could not partake in the sticky, fluffiness that is Indian Fry Bread seems bleak.  That is why I want to work with dysphagia patients–to help them retain and enjoy the foods central to their culture.

 

SLP Goal: Dysphagia-Cat Food

21 Aug

This needs some editing, but it’s a start.  I probably won’t use it, even though it’s a nice creative writing exercise and memorable.  It could work, I just have a better one in mind, that’s all.

Pulling the silver can from the bottom shelf with my left hand, I opened the top, silverware drawer and excavated a can-opener.  Setting the short metal on the counter-top with a clink, I then lined the teeth of the can-opener on the edge of the rounded tin and squeezed down.  There was a “pop” as a puncture bit its way through the rim, and I could instantly smell salty gravy, and see some cloudy liquid oozing out of the tiny puncture.  Twisting the white handle, of my easy-grip can-opener I scraped my way around the top of lid, making confetti of the ajoining blue, paper label covering the can.  The pungent aroma filled the kitchen with a undefined meaty, smell.  The paper bits and gravy make a slimy, brown semi-circle on the tan counter.

Disposing of the lid in the trash, I perceived the contents of the can.  A shiny, gelatinous mass, of mottled brown coloration wiggled up at me.  I got my worn, tupper-ware bowl, stained peach from a prior meal of spaghetti sauce, and turned the open can upside down over it.  After some shaking and squeezing of the sides of the aluminum sides, the circular mound of food, can rings tattooed around its periphery, landed in my container with a plopping noise.  A scooped the mass of congealed gravy that was shy to exit, with a fork.

Mashing the psuedo-can with my fork, the mushy, wet, brown food sent waves of odor to my nose.  I scooped up a small, bite of food and lifted it to my mouth.  It tastes–Wait!  Does anyone want to find out the answer of how this mystery meat tastes?  There is nothing appealing about the above description, and no person should have to resort to this food. I just described opening a can of cat food.  No one, dysphagia or not, should have to endure a meal reminiscent of this.  Food should be a family affair to cook, harken cultural traditions, look pretty, and smell good.  There should be fresh ingredients and texture.

cut out

I want to combine my veterinary experience with endoscopy and radiographs, my education in speech and hearing sciences, and my creativity to help people with swallowing disorders, because I love food and cannot imagine a sad, meal time of bland, non-discriminate slop from a can eaten alone.  I hope to imbibe my dysphagia-friendly food with some flair–help my clients regain not only confidence in a safe eating experience, but some flair and festivity to recourse.  Everyone should be able to cook, look forward to, and delight in their meals, not dread, fear, and bare them.

 

I Out-Clevered Myself

29 Nov

Again.  And yes, I just invented the new word clevered.  As in the act of being clever.  Or in my case, not so much.  So here is an entertaining story, though there is a lot of swallowing anatomy you need to brush up on (probably) to fully appreciate it.

So I’m taking my (LAST-YAY!) Anatomy exam, reading carefully per the usual, and I come upon this question:  “In what stage of swallowing does saliva mix with the bolus?”  Or something to that effect–I obviously don’t have a photographic memory.

Anyhow, it was a word bank consisting of each of the 4 stages:

A]  Oral Prepatory (stage 1 where food is manipulated and maticated until a swallow-able bolus is formed),

B]  Oral (posterior propulsion of bolus toward pharynx),

C]  Pharyngeal (bolus travels through the pharynx),

and D]  Esophogeal (bolus moves from Upper Esophogeal Sphinctor to the Lower Esophogeal Sphinctor.

But here was my logic when I was considering the question.  There are 3 major salivary glands (that we learned about) in/near the oral cavity:

1.  The sublingual under the tongue that produces a protein-rich mucous fluid that is a ropey quality to encapsulate material and form the bolus.

2.  The submandibular that produces both serous and mucous fluid to lubricate the bolus.

3.  The parotid, located between the anterior and posterior faucial piller (this fact will come into play later!) that produces serous fluid that helps propel the bolus into and through the pharynx rapidly.

Got all that?

SO, there had to be 2 correct answers.  Because the sublingual collects residue in the oral-prep phase AND the parotid helps initiate a fast and effiecient pharyngeal swallow.  I made my case to the prof, who exasperated at my over-thinking, asked which was MORE important.

I couldn’t decide.  If residue wasn’t collected and a bolus wasn’t formed at all a person could starve, or at least lose weight.  BUT if the pharyngeal swallow is delayed or inefficient, a person could choke or aspirate and die.  So Both.  Pretty.  Important.

I explained this, and wanting to be rid of me and my crazy-meticulous questions, reading into HER questions, she told me to put both.  So I walked back to my desk, satisfied my answer was correct and complete and marked A and C.  Oral-Prep and Pharyngeal.  Then, as always, when I was going back through my test to make sure I hadn’t skipped anything or made any stupid mistakes and saw that A and C.  Oops!  I accidently put C when I meant B, I thought to myself hastily changing the answer, and thanking my lucky stars I had double checked.

I turned in the test, left the room, and started on my between class walk on the trail, thinking about the exam.  And do you know what I thought?  The pharyngeal phase is initiated when any part of the bolus moves past the anterior faucial piller.  And?  The parotid salivary gland is behind that-DOH!  I had changed my second answer to B-oral phase, when it WAS in fact C, pharyngeal.  Damn, after making a huge deal about that question I STILL got it wrong.

I kill myself.

 

Crock Pot Congee/Juke

18 Nov

OK, I found a dysphagia recipe that I can cook in the crockpot–so that cinches it.  I’m going with Case 5, the Asian gal.  Less work=great!

Ingredients


  • When I prepared this porridge it was in a slow cooker(unconventional method) but you can purchase a Congee cooker. It takes all day but it’s well worth it.
  • I used 1-1/2 cups of a good quality rice and soaked it overnight.
  • The next morning I drained the rice and rinsed it “carefully” under cold running water.
  • I added the rice to the crock pot / slow cooker with at least 3 – 4 cups of either homemade vegetable stock and water or chicken broth and water and I always added finely chopped onions, mincedgarlic and a dash of hot sauce but that was my personal choice.
  • I do not have exact measurements for this recipe because I did it by eye.
  • I cooked this on high for the entire day, usually adding more hot liquid throughout the day.
  • The consistency is not too thick and not too thin orwatery.shopping list
  • I always placed a tea towel over the top of the crock pot / slow cooker to prevent any heat from escaping.
  • This porridge is absolutely delicious and excellent as cold weather comfort food. We usually hadbaby bok choy, chopped green onionssoy sauceand hot sauce with this. I like a dollop of butter on mine as well 😉

Which of the 3 Dysphagia Studies Should I Do?

15 Nov

Italian-cheese & bacon frittata:

This one would be easy to cook, since I’ve made it before and have the entire recipe with amounts in my own cookbook.  Also it keeps sort of well overnight so I could cook it ahead of time.  I would have to spend some time on the case history though.  Also, it’s not all that pretty to look at, not very ethnic, not healthy or nutritious, not hypoallergenic, and not entirely creative.  So I would be unlikely to win any of the categories.

Case study-

A 65 year old from Montana, that prefers Traditional American foods reminiscent of Denny’s.  She is used to eating large breakfasts such as bacon, eggs, toast, and hash browns as well as steak, pork chops, and green beans.

She had ________ which gave her ___________.  Now she needs to be on a _________ diet.

rationale-

The meal incorporates a lot of her breakfast favorites.

recipe-

pg 25 in MY cookbook:

Ingredients-

southwestern egg substitute

crumbled bacon

bacon grease

American cheese

Procedure-

Grease a muffin tin (only fill each half full of mixture–will rise) with butter/margarine (to add calories).  Use Southwest liquid eggs and substitute bacon grease for bacon (about 1 George Foreman catcher-full, or grease from 8 pieces).  Use 1 C whipping cream instead of milk to get the right calories and consistency.  +/- small sprinkle of cheese after baking.

nutritional content

Layered fajitas:

I think this one has potential.  Though it is probably the most difficult out of the three choices, since I have neither planned it, made it, or written about a case study using it.  So LOTS of work and practice would be involved.  BUT–it would be creative and visually appealing and one of the few main dishes offered.   Plus, when I made one of the components, it was super-tasty and even (picky-britches) Cool really liked it.

case study-

_______ is a 80 year old, cognitively aware, man with ALS.  Due to __________, there is risk of aspiration, and he needs to be on a puree/pudding-consistency diet.  He is having trouble getting enough calorie intake to realize an appropriate body mass index, and still likes very flavorful foods of all types.  He misses eating at bar and grill-type restaurants most.

rationale-

I put all ingredients in a food processor to make them pudding-consistency.  The peppers are flavorful, as well as nutritious due to high vitamin content.  Adding a lot of calories, by putting in cream cheese, whipping, cream, and butter liberally.

recipe-

1 pkg cream cheese

3 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce

green peppers

water to blend

nutritional content

Congee(Chinese chicken and rice porridge):

I have good rationale and the case history is one of the provided ones.  That’s good and bad, since the work is done, but I won’t get extra points or win for writing the best case study.  Though, Mindy provided me a complete recipe with amounts so all I would have to do is execute it.  But I’m not certain if it would meet the dysphagia guidelines or if I could cook it ahead of time.  As for the voting–it IS ethnic, since Mindy’s Asian parents make it, it could be creative if I do novel add-ins.  But it wouldn’t be all that pretty.  Maybe on the healthy, non-allergenic, or nutritious categories. . .

case study-

#5–Cantonese

The patient (Mr. Y) is a native of China whose first language is Cantonese. He and his wife came to the US in 1982. He is now 58 years old and lives in the Asian section of Chicago and speaks little English. He is the owner of an Asian food company. He entered the acute care hospital with symptoms of a brainstem stroke. He has mild dysarthria and severe dysphagia. As in many cultures, mealtime is a time of togetherness and socialization, and this was no different for Mr. Y and his family. His children come for dinner at least twice a week, and he and his wife are upset about his inability to eat the way he used to. Hi swallow study revealed a severe delay in triggering the pharyngeal swallow, followed by a severely weakened pharyngeal swallow with reduced laryngeal elevation. After a lot of therapy, it was found that his swallow improved with sour liquids and a variety of postural changes and exercises that targeted a better pharyngeal swallow. Mr. Y was then advised to begin drinking and eating liquids, thick liquids, purees, and mechanical soft foods.

Create a soft food or beverage that this client would like and would be appropriate.

rationale-

My Asian roomie, Mindy shared a traditional family recipe that she consumes when she is ill.  Her parents often made it when she was a child and she was sick with the flu or it was just a gray and rainy day and the family wanted comfort food.  Depending how much water you use, you can adjust the thickness of it.  The wonderful thing about this dish, is there are limitless modifications that can change it slightly to avoid boredom.  It can be made plain (with some salt) or with stuff in it (ground beef, shredded chicken, fish, meats, ma po tofu, etc… it can get really elaborate).

recipe-

yield: Serves 4

active time: 40 min

total time: 5 1/2 hr

Also known as jook, congee turns up in Chinese households morning, noon, and night. This thick rendition is made heartier with the addition of chicken.

Ingredients

  • 3 1/2 to 4-lb chicken, cut into serving pieces, including back and giblets (exclude liver)
  • 10 cups water
  • 3 tablespoons Chinese rice wine or medium-dry sherry
  • 3 (1/4-inch-thick) slices fresh ginger
  • 3 scallions, halved crosswise and smashed with flat side of a heavy knife
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup long-grain rice
  • Accompaniment: fine julliene of fresh ginger, thinly sliced scallions, and Asian sesame oil

Preparation

Bring chicken and water to a boil in a 5-quart heavy pot, skimming froth. Add wine, ginger, scallions, and salt and cook at a bare simmer, uncovered, 20 minutes, or until breast meat is just cooked through. Transfer 1 breast half with tongs to a bowl and continue to cook stock at a bare simmer, skimming froth as neccessary, 2 hours and 40 minutes. Meanwhile, cool chicken breast long enough to remove skin and bones, returning skin and bones to stock.

Cool breast meat completely and tear into shreds. Chill shreds, covered, and bring to room temperature before serving.

Pour stock through a large seive into a large bowl and discard solids. (you should have about 8 cups: if less, add water; if more, cook longer after adding rice.) Return stock to cleaned pot and add rice. Bring to a boil and stir. Reduce heat to low and simmer, covered until consistency of oatmeal, about 1 3/4 hours, stirring frequently during last 1/2 hour of cooking. (Congee will continue to thicken as it stands. thin with water if necessary.)

Season congee with salt. Serve topped with chicken and accompaniments.

Cooks’ note: • Stock can be made 1 day ahead. Cool. uncovered, before chilling, covered. Discard solidified fat.

nutritional content-

 

Legit Journal Sources for ALS

1 Nov

Sorry about the gap, people.  And ending it with school-work.  My mofo Anatomy prof scheduled an exam on November 1 at 8AM.  Who DOES that?!  Oh, AND tacked on an entire chapter the class before the exam.  All pathologies–forcing me to cram that info into my short-term memory only to regurgitate (dysphagia pun intended) it for the exam and forget it later.  Why does academia HATE Halloween?  I hated having to study on one of the best holidays. . .  I hhave a mind to watch a horror movie tonight to make up for it.

Anyway, on with my homework:  I found three suitable (and fully available) peer-reviewed journal articles.  And boy, was I glad I had done some of the leg work over the summer.  I just took the references I had typed up into the library and looked until I found 3 live copies that were on my list.

But now, I hold pages and pages of dry and confusing info–only some of it helpful for my anatomy paper.  The hard part–other then understanding what I’m reading–is figuring out which parts to keep and which to discard.  What info is important?  This is what I need to parse out of these jargon-y research articles.

I have a hankering to highlight upon the copies.  BUT these journals were relatively hard to get my hands on and tedious to copy (and later scan into the computer) so I don’t want to mar them in any way.  Instead, I’ll try to start by typing the main points in a sort of outline form.  Then I can see all in one place what I have, and sort of shape MY paper from there.

A:  New England Journal of Medicine

1.  Contains good background info and definitions:

-progressive degeneration of both upper and lower motor nerons.

2.  Talks about how it’s difficult to diagnose and differentiate ALS from other motor neuron syndromes.

3.  Discuss possible causation

-genetic

-gene mutations

-chromosomal location (bunch of letters and #) tied to Parkinsons?

-environmental

–high incidence in Guam

–heavy metals

–virus

–prion dz

-autoimmunity

4.  Features of ALS:

(lots of jargon, language, tests, and sci I don’t understand)

5.  Therapy:

-Riluzole

-ventilation considerations (*ties to resp section of anatomy)

-tx depression

-gene and stem cell therapy–>

-advances in genetics has accelerated ALS research looking for a cure.

6.  End of life issues

 

B:  American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

1.  More specific dz defining info w/symptoms

2.  Gives info on sample for study on nutrition in ALS patients.

3.  Tells what is measured and how.

3.5 each patient kept food journal for 3 days of regular diet.

4.  Tells how energy expenditure was measured.

5.  Blood panel was taken–says what components looked at.

6.  Tells how pulmonary function evaluated

7.  Results (full of stat and jargon, but *highly related to our anatomy systems.)

8.  Discussion (still full of jargon, but less stats and puts together experiement and the results, that would be useful for our paper/presentation.

 

C:  Dysphagia

1.  Tells they studied early dysphagia in their experiment.

-who was in sample

-how measured

-methods

2.  Very specific methods used to study dysphagia.  (jargony and boring, but mentions a *ton of anatomy and structures relevant to us).

-videofluoroscopic

-manometric

3.  Results (very technical, but includes good graphs and pics)

4.  Discussion

-interesting ALS stats

Tells specifically how ALS impacts swallowing.

Dsyphagia Treatment Questions

5 Oct

I was doing the assigned readings for Anatomy (among other things, highlighting special dysphagia recipes  and concurrently at work we had an anorexic cat come in, which made me wonder:

Ok, so medical/surgical intervention is all about if the benefits of doing something outweigh the risks.  Example:  Doing a dental, which necessitates sedation IS worthwhile in a six year old kitty without heart issues, while it is NOT worth the risk in a 17 year old cat with a heart condition (or probably in the 17 y.o. cat even without a known heart issue).  And over and over, the text says how serious and life-threatening dysphagia can be for patients.  They can easily aspirate or get an aspiration pneumonia

Which brings me to my question:  On Intervention I saw this gal who an an eating disorder where they had placed a feeding tube directly in her stomach.  And she could feed herself that way.  This particular lady had kept it in for years–which was way too long.  The only ill-effect (aside from her mental condition and disordered thoughts) was skin infection and hygiene of the tube.  BUT in life-threatening dysphasia patients, wouldn’t a little skin infection be a worthwhile risk if aspiration could be completely avoided?

On the same track, we have a cat at work who went anorexic.  And in felines even three days without eating (for whatever reason, whether it’s a disease process, nausea, or pickiness) can cause liver failure.  So it’s very important to either stimulate the cat to eat, syringe-feed them, or place a feeding tube.  We placed the tube right from neck to stomach.  And then put the food, and medications right in the tube–nothing by mouth.  So couldn’t you just place a feeding tube and then throw antibiotics into the tube for dysphagia?  Or give periodic antibiotic injections to ward off the skin infection of a long-term feeding tube?

It seems to me the feeding tube is a better option for someone with swallowing difficulty then tedious meal plans and risk of aspiration. . .

And my last question–I’ve heard of anorexics getting “nutrition” through their IV bags.  Is that a thing, and can’t that be done for dysphagia patients, who have it from, say, ALS?  Where they might be bed-ridden anyway?

There is research to be done.

Eating Dysphagic Part 2

4 Aug

The crust-less pie revolution!  Pie in the Sky.

1.)

Basic Impossible Pie

Base (Regular):
1-1/2 cups milk
3/4 cup biscuit mix (Bisquick®)
3 eggs
salt and pepper

Base (Large):
2 cups milk
1 cup biscuit mix
4 eggs
salt and pepper

Fillings:
Approx. 1/2 to 1 cup chopped cooked meat, more or less
Approx. 3/4 to 1 cup shredded cheese, more or less
Approx. 3/4 to 1 cup chopped cooked or raw vegetables, more or less

Use a regular 9-in pie pan, or a 10-in or larger quiche pan for the large recipe.
Heat oven to 400º

Grease pie plate. Sprinkle filling ingredients (meat and/or vegetables and cheese) into pie plate.
Beat base ingredients until smooth, 15-30 seconds in a blender, or 1 minute on high with a hand beater, or 2 minutes by hand.
Pour into plate.
Bake approx. 25-35 minutes, until knife inserted in center comes out clean and top is golden brown.

Cool 5 minutes. 4 to 8 servings.

2.)

4 eggs
2 cups milk
1/3-2/3 cups sugar (depends on how sweet you like it)
1 tsp vanilla
1/4 tsp salt
2/3 cups flour
1/2 stick butter, melted.
dash of nutmeg, cinnamon, or other favorite spice

Mix all ingredients in blender, and blend until smooth. Pour into a lightly greased pie plate, and bake at 350 for about an hour, or until a toothpick stuck in the center comes out clean. TIP: place the empty pie plate on the oven rack, and then pour in the mixture. Fewer spills that way. :-)

Once the pie is baked, you have a custardy top, with a thicker bottom “crust”. Wonderfully tasty!

You can sprinkle a little coconut on top, for a lovely golden “crust”. We’ve also flavored this pie with Irish Cream, Kahlua, or crushed up candy canes.

3.)  Ingredients:

  • 10 oz frozen spinach, thawed and liquid squeezed out
  • 1/2 cup scallions, chopped
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh dill
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
  • 1/2 cup (2.5 oz) reduced fat crumbled feta
  • 2 tbsp grated Asiago cheese
  • 1/2 cup white whole wheat flour (Bob’s Red Mill)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 2/3 cup fat free milk
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 2 large eggs, beaten
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • fresh cracked pepper to taste
  • cooking spray (I used my misto)

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400°. Lightly spray a pie dish with cooking spray or your misto.
Mix spinach, scallions, dill, parsley, feta cheese, and in the pie dish.

Sift flour and baking powder in a medium bowl. Add remaining ingredients to the bowl and blend well. Pour into pie dish.

Bake 28 to 33 minutes or until knife comes out clean from the center. Let it stand at least 5 minutes before serving.

4.)

1/2 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
1/2 cup sugar
2 cups milk
4 eggs
1/4 cup butter
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon salt
1-1/2 cups flaked coconut

Preheat oven to 350°. Butter a deep 9-inch wide pie pan.

Melt the butter. Place the flour, sugar, milk, eggs, melted butter, vanilla and salt into a blender and process for 10 – 12 seconds. Alternately, you can use a food processor fitted with a blade attachment and pulse 12 – 15 times. By hand, stir the coconut into the mixture. Pour the mixture into the prepared pie pan.

Bake the pie for 40 – 50 minutes; watch carefully after the first half hour. The pie will puff up a bit and then fall slightly. It is finished baking when set and may be lightly browned.

Remove the pie from the oven to cool. Place in the refrigerator to chill thoroughly.

5.)  * Pumpkin, canned, without salt, 2 cup (remove)

* *Coconut Milk, 1 cup (remove)

* *Trader Joe’s Unsweetened  Soy Milk, .5 cup (remove)

* Egg, fresh, 2 large (remove)

* Brown Sugar, .5 cup, packed (remove)

1 t cinnamon

1/4 t allspice

1/2 t ginger

Mix together. put in greased round pie pan (I use pyrex.) Bake 425 for 15 minutes. Bake 350 for 45 minutes until inserted knife comes out clean.

Number of Servings: 8