Tag Archives: interview

Top Interview Q’s (not by me)

15 Feb

Most Common Interview Questions
1.What are your strengths?
2.What are your weaknesses?
3.Why are you interested in working for [insert company name here]?
4.Where do you see yourself in five years? Ten years?
5.Why do you want to leave your current company?
6.Why was there a gap in your employment between [insert date] and [insert date]?
7.What can you offer us that someone else can not?
8.What are three things your former manager would like you to improve on?
9.Are you willing to relocate?
10.Are you willing to travel?
11.Tell me about an accomplishment you are most proud of.
12.Tell me about a time you made a mistake.
13.What is your dream job?
14.How did you hear about this position?
15.What would you look to accomplish in the first 30 days/60 days/90 days on the job?
16.Discuss your resume.
17.Discuss your educational background.
18.Describe yourself.
19.Tell me how you handled a difficult situation.
20.Why should we hire you?
21.Why are you looking for a new job?
22.Would you work holidays/weekends?
23.How would you deal with an angry or irate customer?
24.What are your salary requirements? (Hint: if you’re not sure what’s a fair salary range and compensation package, research the job title and/or company on Glassdoor.)
25.Give a time when you went above and beyond the requirements for a project.
26.Who are our competitors?
27.What was your biggest failure?
28.What motivates you?
29.What’s your availability?
30.Who’s your mentor?
31.Tell me about a time when you disagreed with your boss.
32.How do you handle pressure?
33.What is the name of our CEO?
34.What are your career goals?
35.What gets you up in the morning?
36.What would your direct reports say about you?
37.What were your bosses’ strengths/weaknesses?
38.If I called your boss right now and asked him what is an area that you could improve on, what would he say?
39.Are you a leader or a follower?
40.What was the last book you’ve read for fun?
41.What are your co-worker pet peeves?
42.What are your hobbies?
43.What is your favorite website?
44.What makes you uncomfortable?
45.What are some of your leadership experiences?
46.How would you fire someone?
47.What do you like the most and least about working in this industry?
48.Would you work 40+ hours a week?
49.What questions haven’t I asked you?
50.What questions do you have for me?

Interview Prep: MU Vet

26 Jun

1. What does a vet do?

Veterinarians are responsible for maintaining the health and welfare of animals, preventing disease, and educating people about animal care.
There are various jobs in the veterinary field, including military positions, conservation, development of drugs and vaccines, teaching, food safety and public health, sports medicine, as well as zoo and aquatic veterinarians.
Veterinarians can also continue their education and specialize in a variety of fields such as lab animal medicine, internal surgery, or behavior.

2. What is the best thing about being a vet?

I like the combination of skills veterinarians use on a daily basis. The challenge of being mentally capable, physically fit, and compassionate is one I am confident I will excel at.

3. What is the worst thing about being a vet?

I’m glad there is an option of euthanasia in veterinary medicine. That said, my least favorite aspect of the job is seeing an animal with a treatable ailment get euthanized because the owner does not want to spend money. I understand euthanasia is part of the job and know that veterinarians cannot save them all, but it is unfortunate when an owner refuses to do what is best for their pet.

4. Why do you want to be a veterinarian?

I have always loved animals, and starting in 5th grade I observed, volunteered, and worked in veterinary settings. All the experience made me even more passionate about becoming a veterinarian. I am excited to own my own veterinary hospital in a rural area where I can combine the organization and meticulousness of Dayton Valley Veterinary Hospital and the availability and willingness to see a variety of species that is characteristic of Noah’s Ark Animal Hospital.

5. What type of veterinary medicine do you want to work in?

I definitely want to practice medicine in a rural area. Most of my experience is with small animals, so at this point I would be most comfortable working in small animal private practice with an emphasis on exotics. Though working with horses, and getting some exposure to larger animals, made me open to working in a mixed practice.

6. What is your favorite leadership?

I have participated in many leadership opportunities including being captain of my cheerleading team for 3 years, helping diverse children in an alcohol and drug free safe space, working with senior citizens in National Honor Society, and participating in a session at Cedar Creek Therapeutic Riding Center with disabled people.
My favorite leadership was when I held offices in the pre-vet club. I was in the club every year of college, and acted as social chair for 2 years and vice president this last year. It’s my favorite leadership, because many people were wary of the club and could not see the benefits of being involved. I think, just like anything else in life, you get out of it what you put into it. I tried my best to help turn the club around, and therefore had a great experience.

7. What has your greatest achievement been?

I’m proud of all of the volunteer hours I have accrued, both in the veterinary setting and around my community. I made a concerted effort to gain experience in veterinary hospitals and succeeded in accumulating 728 hours following veterinarians one on one. I have also spent quite a bit of time helping children, the disabled, and senior citizens in both Nevada and Missouri. In high school, I was awarded with 8 scholarships, many recognizing my volunteer efforts.

8. What is your greatest strength?

My enthusiasm is my greatest strength. I have wanted to be a veterinarian since I was little, and took steps to achieve that goal starting at a young age. I was so excited to get into the career that I volunteered over 600 hours at small animal hospitals. I have also worked at small animal hospitals continuously since 2001. My entheusiasm was not limited to small animals. I jumped at every opportunity to gain experience with other species. I helped Dr. Minor vaccinate wolves and went with our relief veterinarian to Sierra Biomedical to see what lab animal veterinarians do on a daily basis. I went with the Chapmans to see a swine facility and helped them vaccinate the staff’s horses. Other staff at Noah’s Ark worked with animals, so I volunteered to help vaccinate, deworm, and castrate sheep as well as volunteered with large exotics at Animal Sanctuary. I got experience with horses working at Equine Medical Services and observed large animal medicine at Comstock Large Animal Hospital. Currently, I am working with pigs, rats, and frogs on environmental physiology aspects of several studies at the animal science research center.

9. What has been the greatest lesson from your volunteer experience/job?

Through my varied experiences in the veterinary field, I have learned that working long hours 7 days a week is normal. I have regularly worked on holidays at all my jobs and understand I will not make as much as a dentist. I have realistic expectations about my future as a veterinarian and am excited to work hard for as long as I am able.

10. What is your biggest weakness?

I am not independently wealthy. To compensate, I got scholarships, worked one or more jobs, and secured loans to pay for my living expenses and education.

11. What are your plans if you do not get in this year?

I will apply to Ross because my first career choice is still veterinary medicine. While I’m waiting to hear from them, I will pursue a masters degree.

12. What is a failure or disappointment and how did you deal with it?

The fact that I did not get accepted to veterinary school my first two tries is disappointing. Instead of getting discouraged and bitter, I took the advice of the veterinary school and tried to increase my undergraduate GPA and course load this last semester. I went to Nevada to take advantage of a scholarship I still have. The situation in NV was far from ideal: I lived in my boss’ yard with no heat or water, and had to drive 400 miles a week to attend class and observe at a large animal hospital. I made it through the less than optimal situation and still want to be a veterinarian more than ever!

13. Why are you the best candidate?

I moved to Missouri to gain residency because I heard that the veterinary school had a good reputation and offered a superior education. I obviously want to be a veterinarian, because I have been involved in the field since I was in 5th grade and this is the 3rd time I have applied to school. I will not change my mind about my career aspirations or flake out and transfer to a different school or drop out altogether—I’m in this for the long haul. I want to further the profession of veterinary medicine by offering my clients affordable prices, an elevated standard of medicine, and extended hours of availability. I plan to practice in a rural town as long as I am able to work.

15. Do you have anything to add to your application?

I’ve been very busy this semester. I resumed my position at Noah’s Ark and I’m helping with environmental physiology at the animal science research center. I am helping collect and input heat stress data on pigs. I also work with rodents to see how diet affects temperature regulation. I’m also taking a class on veterinary terminology with Dr. Chastain.

14. Any final questions or comments?

Throw in question answers if they weren’t asked.

Typical of Saint George Vet: Interview Schedule

7 Jun

7-16-08

Hello —-,

 

The  Board of Admissions is pleased to invite you to attend an interview as

the  next  stage  in  your application to St. George’s University School of

Veterinary Medicine.

 

Your  interview will take place in Stillwater, OK.  It will be conducted by

Patrick Morgan, DVM, a representative for St. George’s University School of

Veterinary  Medicine.    Dr. “old dude” will be contacting you to arrange for a

convenient  date  and time to interview.  He will also furnish you with the

directions at that time.

 

While  the  primary  goal  of the interview is to assess the attributes and

motivations  of  the  veterinary  school  candidate,  this  is  the perfect

opportunity  for  you  to  learn  more about our facilities and programs as

  1. I  am  sure  that you have already given thoughtful consideration to

many  aspects  of  a  veterinary  medicine  education, and we would like to

encourage  you  to  address  any  specific  questions about St. George’s in

particular directly to us.

 

 

Please note that at the start of your interview, you will be asked to write

a  brief personal essay. You will be given about 10 to 15 minutes to answer

one out of three questions. The questions are based on personal experiences

or  motivations.  The essay is a great opportunity to tell us a little more

about you.

 

Once you have confirmed your arrangements, please inform me via email.

 

Thank  you for your cooperation and interest in St. George’s University. We

look forward to meeting you.

 

 

Regards,

Admissions Counselor

U.S. Admissions

 

St. George’s University

N American Correspondence

C/o University Support Services LLC

One East Main Street

Bay Shore, NY 11706

9-5-08
Good afternoon, [not my name]. I am back from Grenada and trying to set my calendar for the remainder of September. Please send me a list of dates you can come to Stillwater with your preferences in order. I will schedule a date as close to your first choice as possible. I look forward to talking with you about your chosen career.
“old dude,” DVM

 

9-10-08

Good morning, [my actual name, thank you]. You get 1st choice, Sept 23rd. Let me know whether you would like to interview morning or afternoon and, if you have a specific time that is best for you, let me know. I will not make other commitments on the 23rd until I know your preferences. I have your application papers so you don’t need to bring any of that. You should prepare an outline of how you will finance your 4 year DVM program.

Do you want me to make a motel reservation for you or send you the telephone numbers of local motels? I look forward to talking with you.

old dude, DVM
Adjunct Professor, SGU/SVM

Hello ——,

A final determination can take up to 4 to 6 weeks depending on how often
the Board meets and how competitive your file is. Feel free to contact me
for any updates after your interview.

Regards,
Admissions Counselor

I’m starting to panic. This vet school interview isn’t scheduled yet. My guy is not dependable at all. He put this off until September, forgot to call, didn’t even remember me when I called, pretended that he was planing on calling me that day, then blew me off and never called back. I don’t know if I should pester him and make him angry, or wait, or change my interview location. . . Then, I see people are getting accepted for January, possibly taking my scholarships, and they had to wait a month after their interview to find out! I feel powerless and stressed!

I need to calm down. I can’t do the interview for at least 2 weeks anyone. During that time, I will have my surgery and make $3,000 to fund my education. I can also have time to plan the trip and get dad together if necessary. That leaves me about 14 weeks, or four months to get my shit together. That’s plenty of time. I can fly Gandhi to Nevada and be there for Nevada day. Then, I can go back to Missouri, work and pack the rest of my apartment. Since everything is already in storage it won’t take long. I can clean the apartment and be done. The lease doesn’t run out until the end of December.

What else needs to be done before I go to another country? I need to sell some stuff, but I typed a list yesterday. Today I should look on the newspapers and see how to post an add. Going to Nevada later than Halloween won’t be so bad—I’ll make more money at my job, not pay for an empty apartment, and only have the chance to fight with my parents for 7 weeks. That’s plenty of time to spend with my parents. It’s over the holidays. As long as I’m there by Thanksgiving it will work out fine. If I’m here, I can moake money, study in peace, and write my book. That’s good.

This is fine I only need to know by October 20 if I’m going. A week to make my plane reservation. You know, I can actually make that reservation to fly Gandhi as soon as I can pay for it. I need to start communication with Aunt Linda to see about Choco-luv first. Ok, no worries. This gives me a chance to practice interview questions and write essays. Ok, sell stuff, write Aunt Linda, get rid of some stuff and maybe start cleaning empty parts of my apartment. Get dad’s train route, and my driving route.

9-13-08
Good morning, —–. Anytime 9 to 10 AM would be best for me. Let me know where you will be staying as some of the motels have very good places to have a private conversation and some do not. If you are staying in one of the latter, we will talk in my home office. I retired from Okla. State in 1995 and thus have no university office.

As to your writing assignment, you are correct in that I cannot tell you specifics except that you will be given your choice of three questions relating to the veterinary profession.
This is designed to be spontaneous and of short duration. From what I have seen in your application you should have no problem with this assignment.

Usually the SGU Registrar’s Office does not tell the applicant anything about the interviewer, but the interviewer knows quite a bit about the applicant. My career is a testimony to the many opportunities available to veterinarians. I have been a veterinarian 50 years and married to the same lady 50 years. DVM from UGeorgia 1958, 4 years with USDA, MPH from Tulane Medical Center 1963, 2 years US Army, DrPH Tulane 1968, 1 yr clinician in Tulane Medical School laboratory animal facility, 5 years faculty/administrator in Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, 23 years combined work with OK Dept. of Public Health, OKU School of Public Health, OKStateU School of Veterinary Medicine, 1 yr faculty/administrator Ross U SVM St. Kitts W.I., 2 yrs owner/clinician small animal out patient clinic in South Louisiana, last 2+ years part-time consultant with St. George’s U/SVM. There; more than you ever wanted to know.

My interviews usually are 1 to 2 hrs depending on how many questions the applicant asks me.

I look forward to talking with you on the 23rd. My Stillwater telephone # is —–.

old dude, DVM

9-15-08
Good morning, —–. I need to meet with you a little earlier than we had planned; 8:30 AM in the lobby of the Fairfield if this works for you. If not, please call me at—–.

Patrick Morgan, DVM

Hello ——,

Are you still interested in applying to our school, I haven’t heard from
you in quite some time.

Regards,

Thank you, and good luck!

9-16-08
Once your interview is over your summary will be forwarded along with your
file to the Board for a final determination. If you have any other
questions, or concerns please let me know!!

Regards,

9-29-08
I was just wondering if Dr. old dude sent my interview paperwork to the
school yet. I’m very anxious to find out if I’m accepted!

Thanks!

Yes ——-,

Your file is currently with the Board, I should have something within a
couple of weeks. Feel free to check your status at any time!

Regards,

10-6-08
Yes, they have, and I have checked on your file last Friday (I usually
check every week on the review progress). I’m hoping to get a decision
back as soon as possible, however keep in mind that the usual time frame
can take up to 6-8 weeks. I’ll call you as soon as I hear something and in
the mean time feel free to check up on your file as many times as you like!

Regards,

Interview: MU Vet Med

4 Jun

Z-O-U

Interview
What does a vet do?
Vets work long hours to educate owners, treat animals, perform surgery, engage in research, and promote the veterinary field.
What is best about being a vet?
I enjoy the combination of skills that a veterinarian is required to use on a daily basis. A vet has to be mentally capable, physically fit, dexterous with her hands, compassionate, and be prepared for anything.
What is worst about being a vet?
My least favorite aspect of the job is seeing pet owners who are not willing to do anything for their animal. It’s difficult to see an animal with a treatable ailment get euthanized because the owner does not want to spend money. I understand euthanasia is part of the job and know that veterinarians cannot save them all, but it is unfortunate when an owner refuses to do what is best for their pet.
Why do you want to be a veterinarian?
I have always loved animals and I started to look into the career of vet medicine at an early age. I researched the career and volunteered, and was still not deturred, so I knew veterinary medicine was for me. I like seeing the bond between people and their pets, I think it is exciting how every day is different, and I am anxious to own my own business.
What type of veterinary medicine do you want to work in?
I would like to own a small animal practice with an emphasis on exotics. Dr. Minor jokes that she wants me to sign a letter of intent that I will work for her in my hometown of Dayton, NV.
What is your favorite leadership?
I really enjoy being an active member of the pre-vet club. I have really given my all to the club. I think you get out of it what you put into it–just like anything else. I liked planning the social activities and putting together 2 scrapbooks as the social chair, and I really enjoy organizing the officer meetings and ordering and selling the apparel as vice president. Though, staying positive when members get disgruntled can be difficult, I like trying to make the club fun for everyone.
What has been your greatest achievement thus far?
I am proud of all my volunteer hours. I made a concerted effort to not only clean kennels and stalls in a hospital environment, but to follow a veterinarian as much as possible. I succeeded in being one on one with a vet for 653 hours. In high school, I was rewarded with 8 scholarships, many rewarding me for my volunteer efforts.
What is your greatest strength?
You know, that since this is the 2nd time I have applied to vet school that I am very diligent. If something need to be done I will work at it until it is finished correctly.
What has been the greatest lesson from volunteer/job so far?
I understand that being a veterinarian takes a lot of time. I have worked 12 hour days, without lunch breaks, and I have seen my employers work 7 days a week for months at a time. I realize that veterinarians have to work long, hard hours from the time they graduate until retirement with very little time for recreation. I also know that it is one of the most rewarding jobs a person can have. I am excited to feel the sense of accomplishment of successfully treating a difficult case, and long to know the pride of having a good business because I have practiced meticulous and skillful medicine.
What is your biggest weakness?
I get impatient when I realize not every is going to work as hard as I do. I hate to see other students out drinking before big exams, workers lazing around instead of being productive, and people that do not give their full effort to a project.
What are your plans if you do not get in this year?
I will graduate with my animal science degree and chemistry minor in may, then work to get more animal experience. I plan to take anatomy from the vet school, then re-apply, branching out to vet schools at a national and world level.
What is a failure or disappointment and how did you deal with it?
Last year I did not get into vet school. Instead of getting discouraged and thinking my dreams of being a veterinarian were crushed, I made an effort to improve my application. I worked on my grades, got more animal experience, and worked on my interview skills. This year, I am supremely confident that I will get in!

The Big Day [UU AuD Interview Part III]

18 Mar

Here is my post about interview day:

Friday

-I popped up at 5:30AM and went to run pretty soon after.  I knew I was early, but wanted a chance to drink some water and energy well before interview time so I wouldn’t have to visit the bathroom so much.  It was cold, and if I was not on day 422 in a row, I would have skipped it.  Maybe even then, but I wanted to mention it in my interview, so I forced myself outside into the 31F parking lot to get it done.  It was miserable as expected.  See, even people who follow through on exercise don’t always like it and don’t want to do it.  I just did it to continue what I’d started-I’m no superhero.

UU interview 028

-We left 2 hours early because we didn’t know what Friday morning traffic would be like, and I wasn’t entirely certain we knew how to get directly from point A to point B–since those directions were so convoluted.  BUT traffic was actually very light.  And we found the building fairly easily, making us more then an hour early.  So we just waited in the car, and I finally went in about 10:45AM (check in was 11-11:15AM).

11012375_10205962109630270_89254168319688984_n

-We started with lunch–which in interview clothes is awkward.  And a gal walked in late because she had a class or another interview or something.  The director said help get “my-name” situated to one of the grad students.  Did I hear that correctly?  My name is not very common.  But when I looked at the labeled lunch boxes, sure enough there was my name.  But I hadn’t gotten a good look at the gal so I turned around and tried to see her name tag, but she caught me looking.  And not wanting to be a total creeper, I rolled my chair over and confirmed her name.  Sure enough we have the same unique name!  It would be really cool to be in a class of 12 with another one of me!  NEAT!

-I’m so glad I went with comfortable clothes/shoes.  After a presentation and a sandwich lunch, they drove us to the main campus and gave us a walking tour:  The Student Union with fast-food (Jamba Juice!), a game area with bowling, billiards, air hockey, student store.  It’s all pretty standard now, 11025817_10205962097469966_142382685826090158_nand the kind of thing both UNR and Mizzou were building while I was there–and the kind that opened right after I left in both cases.  They have a fancy rec-center, which is the same story as well. Constructure during my tenure, but I never got to enjoy it before leaving. We also toured our building on the main campus.  They have two research labs, which means possible funding opportunities and resume-building.  It also sounds like the school makes every effort to place the AuD students in departmental work positions–which is a MUST for me ($$$-wise).  We are on the 12th and 13th floors and the view is outstanding!!!!!!!  We can see the cityscape, foothills, and right into the stadium where they had the Opening Ceremony of the 2002 Olympics.  I wish I had brought my camera. . .  My feet were killing, but would have been much worse in any other interview shoes.  My FitBit says we walked 4.39 miles for the entire day minus 1 for my mile = about 3 miles (taking off some for dinner).  Can you believe my FitBit auto-updates from 10 hours away!!!  Anyway, and you know how campuses are all concrete hills and stairs. . .

-Next, I had my individual interview.  I was nervous (of course) but not as much as in the past.  I had prepare–somewhat–for certain questions (none that they asked me as it turns out).  These interviews were set up a lot more low-key then the vet school interviews I’d had.  Instead of sitting at a long table with 4-6 people looking intimidating, these were in rooms at a desk with just one person.  No one asked me any tricky or technical questions as they had in the vet school interviews, so that was good.  First, I had the clinic person ask me questions then, the academic-oriented gal asked me questions.  I’ll try to remember the questions (I think I forgot a few):

* = interviewer talking

! = my response

[my internal thoughts/notes]

yin yang

clinic:

*How do you learn best?

!I learn best by doing something.  With someone watching to make sure I’m doing it properly.  Then doing it alone, and having someone check my work.  Then being trusted enough to work independently.

*Talk about a recent time you learned something that way?

!long pause.  [under pressure I could not think of anything.  Though I paused and looked like I was thinking, what was actually going on in my brain was–come up with something good and impressive relating to audiology or accomplishment you want them to know about!  Uh oh you’ve been quiet for a long time.  Say anything!  Panic!!!] *It doesn’t have to pertain to audiology. !I clean corporate, and that’s how I was trained.  *chuckle.  !My boss showed me what to do, then the next day I did it and he checked me.  Then he said you did this or that wrong or remember to do this.  *Laugh [thinking I was kidding, which I was not.  Even cleaning requires some memory.]  !Then I felt competent.

*Do you work well in a team?

!I prefer to work alone, especially if it is for a grade–I like to earn my own grades.  [WHY did I say interactive hearing anatomy 2this?!  I should have told of a success while working in a team to brag and show cooperation, but I wasn’t expecting the question.]  !But I understand collaboration is important and different perspectives can make the project even better.

*give an example of a time you successfully worked as a team

!pause.  [trying to think of anything tangible and applicable, but mostly just panicking again.] Veterinary hospitals are based on teamwork.  There is a hierarchy, but in order to do the job successfully, statuses have to be thrown out the window.  Even though my job was monitoring anesthetic, doing blood draws, and technical things, I picked up the back-line to relieve the receptionist.  Or carried bags of dog food to the front. . .  Or gloved up and held a spleen [first organ I could think of, which may or may not be accurate.] out of the way during surgery.  *Laughing–because all of us hold the spleen out of the way.

*When did someone’s response take you by surprise (something to that affect)?

!Long pause.  [Again the question caught me off gaurd and was nothing I had prepared for.  I could only think of one story, and though I knew it wasn’t a good interview story, my mind got stuck on it and went blank for anything else. . .]  !We didn’t go over our exams in class, and I want to know why my answers are wrong for the future.  It’s stuff I will need to eventually know.  So I scheduled a meeting with the professor, and apparently it wasn’t a great time for a meeting because instead of seeing me as enthusiastic or consciousness she treated me badly.  I was shocked and I guess mostly disappointed.  I wasn’t a point chisler, I just wanted to make sure I knew the material because I would need to use it for my future.  *surprised such a thing would happen:  What did you do?  !Well, I pressed on and finished the meeting, but I never went back for subsequent tests.  *What did you do instead?  !I just went to a different professor.

*Give an example of flexibility

!pause.  [I am not super-flexible, and I partially came to audiology because it is calm and rote and schedules are given greater respect.]  There is no such thing as a schedule in veterinary medicine.  We Auroasaw walk-ins or when someone called with an emergency, or more likely something they had stared at for two weeks, we got them in.  Eyes have to come in that day because they go bad in a hurry, and abscesses have to be seen immediately.  I probably didn’t get a full lunch the whole time I worked at vet hospitals.  You see appointments, or get the hospitalized animals taken care of to alleviate the afternoon.  I am willing to do what needs to be done.  But I went to audiology partially because there are no ear emergencies. . .

*Why did you leave vet med?

!hesitating.  [I tried to think of some euphemism or temperate way to tell why.  I knew I shouldn’t sound negative and I knew I should try to just say what drew me to audiology.  Again the question caught me off guard and I had not prepared a good answer which made me very nervous.]  !It started to feel thankless.  There is this mentality that veterinary practice is out to swindle people and vets are last wk Frb 2014 001only in it for the money.  Which is not true at all–vets are the lowest paid medical professional and you work with animals because you love it.  We were under-paid and working hard, so it was difficult when none of that was acknowledged.  Audiology won’t have the same financial problems (something to that affect) *skeptical look [clarification:]  People either can’t or don’t want to afford things.  At least in Audiology, if people can’t or won’t afford things it’s not euthanasia.  Also, when your coworkers are all working so hard and so many hours, it can become a grind.  Negative.  I want to be in audiology because generally after people are fitted they are happy and thankful.  It’s rewarding.

*what’s your contribution to aud.

!As I mention throughout my application, Aural Rehab is very important to me.  I think it is the next big thing in audiology and central.  Also, my dad has hearing aids and I see that aural rehab can be better, and I want to be that person one day.  [only good answer to any of the clinic questions.]

–>  I left the clinic portion of the interview feeling like I didn’t do a good job.  I wish I would have anticipated and prepared for some of those questions, because with some forethought I could have answered them MUCH better.  It was too long to produce my answers, I was too negative, I talked about veterinary too much, and I didn’t emphasize audiology enough.  But hopefully something positive was conveyed.

Fall finals 125

academic:

-there’s my Tiger!  She said.  I said “Mizzou!”  [The academic portion was already going much better, and my nervousness subsided a little.]  Then the gal told me she had to call her sisters after reading myGDB tiger by the tail application, because their dad (maybe someone else) graduated from M.U.’s animal science program, then moved to Illinois/Indiana/Iowa (some I-state) and worked for Campbells for a long time.  She also mentioned that she liked or worked with [I was in a nervous state b/c the interview scenario, OK] one of my letter of rec writers.

*How are you at math?

! In my pre-vet course work I took physics 1, physics 2, Biochem, genetics, and enough chemistry to get the minor because I wanted that to be on my transcript for life!  Math doesn’t come as easily to me as writing, but even though it’s not an innate ability, I know to ask for help early if I need it.  [I’m pretty sure I also worked in a mention of tutorng my peers, but I don’t remember exactly what I said.]

*what motivates you?

!I thought about a word that word would describe me, and it is diligence.  I am intrinsically motivated to be the best version of myself.  I regularly compete with myself to be the best I can be.  As an example, I read and typed outlines of all my Riverpoint classes prior to each semester to familiarize with the material and have a backbone for notes.  And in my personal life I have run 422 days in a row–I was in the Econolodge parking lot in 31F this morning completing the mile 1st thing in the morning.  [I HAD to find a way to get that in there!]

*Give an example of how you are dependable

[umm this is only my BEST quality!  Though it’s hard to put an example to this trait without looking phony.]  !My advisor knew she could depend on me to tutor students that needed extra help.  And when no one was around in the summer and she had to do recruitment activities she knew I would be available to do a presentation.

*what area in the scope of practice interests you?

Right now, I’m interested in Aural Rehab, but that could be in every area of the scope of practice. better view of nerves *That’s how I feel too!  Aural Rehab is central and it usually takes time to convince students of that.  You are ahead of the curve.

*Can you balance academics with work?

!chuckle.  [this is also my LIFE, so of course!]  I have always paid my own living expenses and tuition costs, so ever since I went to college I have also had to work.  I am getting very good at balancing school and work.

–>  The academic part of the interview went so well, that I could feel the professor liked me.  When she asked and I answered, I could tell I was IN with her, and she wasn’t critical at all, or even listening super-intently because I could tell I had passed muster with her already.  Finally, on academics (my traditional weak point in pre-vet/interviews) I was a shoo-in.  That was a (different and) nice feeling.  My 4.0 GPA and hard-science experience was finally counting for something and that felt great!

SLC 16

-The group interview was actually a question panel with the program director.  We do have to pay for 9 credits our 4th externship year.  You find your own externship–if you want it to be paid.  And they can be anywhere–Colorado!  I asked what the procedure was if you have a hard time on externship, and she said she would try to straighten things out, but as a last resort you’d be pulled out and find a new one.  But it’s never happened.  I think the last question, which I asked because the forums talk about bad internships a LOT, put me in a negative light with the head of the department.  She may see me as a troublemaker since I asked. . .

SLC 35

-Then we got a tour of our clinic area.  It’s neat because you immediately observe clinic in the first semester, then go in there as you learn things in lecture, are in full-time 2nd semester-3rd to 4th year.  Then you get 3 outside placements which is unique to the school and obviously super beneficial.  This all before the mandatory externship.  Oh, and they use all 7 makes of hearing aids so you have all that experience that not many people have.  And finally wrote an on-the-fly essay and completed a short personality test before the day was over.  I left around 4:15PM (5.5 hours after I walked in).  Mostly I was thirsty!  They had planned the day very tightly, but not really included bathroom opportunities.  So I only had 2 cups of water while I was there, making my total half of what it should have been by the time.  I was fatigued and headachy. . .

So that’s the interview and that’s the main event we had come for.  Overall, I was really excited about the program a facilities, and thought with the exception of the clinic interview (which wasn’t a disaster, but could have been better) I made a good impression.

GreyHELL [UU AuD Interview Part I]

10 Mar

I wrote notes about my trip, but was too tired to organize them into a decent post.  So that’s why I’ve been back home for a week and a half and you’re just now hearing about the big trip.  I have less then 2 months of this horrible swing-shift schedule left, and I can’t wait for my energy and motivation to return!  Here’s part I of the series:

I had no experience with Greyhound buses.  The only thing I really knew about them, is all of my high school sports teams wanted to charter one.  Other, richer, teams got to charter a “real” bus and my small high school teams were very envious-we were stick on our big, yellow bus for even the longest trips.  Even when we had to drive 8 hours to Las Vegas for the STATE track meet.

Laurel's pics 157

I had to get myself to Salt Lake City for an interview, which I thought was overkill.  Most audiology programs don’t interview, and I feel they should have done Skype at most.  It’s a lot to ask of poor college students to pay to go to Utah–in the middle of a semester.  But I knew I should attend if invited, because if only unconsciously-it would go against me if they didn’t meet me in person.

I checked into the airlines, hoping the lower fuel prices would mean cheaper ticket prices.  And of course that wasn’t the case.  What would be a 10 hour drive, was going to be more then $400 for one person.  And that isn’t feasible on my minimum wage when I’m saving for a move–and tuition.

Trains are few and far between, and surprisingly expensive as well.  Driving through Montana or Idaho in the winter with my 1994 car was not super-stable either.  I would be horrified if I had car trouble or got caught in terrible weather over a mountain pass.  There was just no time to mess around with all the possible driving scenarios for an interview situation.  So it looked like the Greyhound would be my cheapest option.  $163 for a round trip.  Which meant Cool could go too–and that’s a LOT better!

Spokompton

Wednesday

-We didn’t want to leave our cars anywhere in the vicinity of sketchy downtown.  And I thought our bus was leaving at 11PM when my coworkers were in the busiest part of the work-day, and my Aunt would be asleep.  It was only the day before we left that I realized it was 11AM.  Twelve hours longer?!  It was too short of notice by then, so we were going to cab it.  But while I was checking prices I saw the Lyft app.  Normal people (not licensed cabbies) drive in their (clean, less then decade old) cars with the punch of the app button.  And it’s HALF the price!  We tried it and it worked out fine–I recommend it.

-We got to the bus station around 9:30AM.  It had an air of desperation and felt old, maybe dirty.  It’s set up a little confusing and we started out standing by the train station til we realized it was closed all day and that wasn’t right.  We wandered to the unmanned Greyhound counter next and since no one was there I grabbed some luggage ID tags and began filling them out.  After 5 minutes, the gal came out from the back (what, was she on a smoke break?!) and did our paperwork.

-We went upstairs and sat on 2 of the 4 available chairs.  People started to arrive, coughing and sneezing (openly, no covering the mouth here) as they did.  Most were dressed in sweats, a few had pink or blue hair.  Some were obnoxiously rowdy already.

-After an hour or so, our bus began to load.  I sat down and was instantly uncomfortable–uh oh.  Bus #1 had incessant, loud-talker.  The guy who knows everything, has done everything and goes on and on and on.  And on.  There would be no napping.  And I had to utilize my ipod (at too loud of a volume level) early on to drown him out.

10

-We were scheduled to transfer in Pasco.  Why our route didn’t go straight down to Walla Walla, I don’t know.  I used every bathroom we stopped at during this entire journey, not wanting to use the Greyhound’s small, and sure to be dirty bathroom.  The people at this station were very diverse:  Lots of hispanics, some Asians, blacks, Middle-Eastern–I had no idea southern WA would have diversity.  And of course one erratic white man talking to himself, pacing, flailing his arms, and throwing his lunch pail against walls. . .

-Bus #2 was comfortable.  The driver did not announce when we were loading and barely indicated which (of 4) buses was ours.  He also hardly talked during the 1.5 hr journey to random Standfield, OR. . .  It was a weird, brief trip and I’m not sure why they did it that way.  This would become the strongest theme of the Greyhound-weird routes, random stops, taking forever longer then it should.

-At the Oregon stop we got to a Pilot center with built-in McDonalds and lots of parking for semi-trucks.  It looked like our driver pulled into the McDonald’s drive through.  And all he said, was this was this bus’ last stop and all of us going to Denver had to get off.  Everyone was confused.  Where were we?  Where was the bus stop?  Would another bus be arriving?  I wasn’t going to Denver–would MY bus be arriving?  How long until the next (hopefully correct) bus take to get here?  I noticed as we got off, that everyone else had the same shell-shocked, nervous demeanor that I did.  This somehow calmed me, because I figured at least we were all in the same boat bus.  And people were trying to ask driver #2 clarifications as he unloaded our checked luggage.  He seemed impatient and just kept saying this was the last stop for this bus. . .  Had our driver quit his job in the middle of his shift??  I did not know.

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-I hate McDonalds–but luckily we had packed snacks and Gatorade.  We used the bathroom, then found a tiny platform with a semi-hidden Greyhound sign along the side (as opposed to in front or beside) the wood.  We sat atop and watched a gal scream at her male companion for awhile.  Hopefully they would not be coming on our next bus.  Then a bus came and unloaded.  It was ours?  Driver #3 was belligerently crabby.  We started to load the bus, but he ordered us to line up and he took all of our tickets at once, while screaming at the smokers.  Six people lit up–and this made me very unhappy–stupid Oregon.  Once he took our tickets, we again tried to load the bus.  Cranky driver yelled to stay in line while he loaded the luggage.  Finally, after 40(?) minutes, we loaded without getting shouted at.  I took the first available double seat, because I didn’t know how many available seats there would be.  This bus was already full of tired, greasy-looking people.  And it smelled of old grease from fast food.  They talked loudly throughout the trip, and Cool became obsessed with her cell phone.  I could not sleep at all.  The driver gave a litany of rules in an angry voice and we drove another hour and a half before stopping for an hour dinner break.  The tall dude (screaming recipient of earlier) kept coming to the front of the bus where his angry gal was.  She would glare horribly, and even went to the back of the bus once to stay away from him.  We stopped for a 20 minute bathroom break and some other dude from the back told the driver someone had a knife.  I knew instantly it was the erratic tall guy.  And that guy kept coming up to the front to see her–I knew he’d eventually stab her or do something crazy.  And the driver eventually yelled at them to stay seated and quit coming back and forth.  Not 5 minutes later tall guy came up, lingered in the isle, went back, then came up to sit in a front seat.  He had not listened at ALL.  After that break we stopped for another hour at the Boise Greyhound station.  Erratic tall guy got kicked off the bus, because apparently his knife had already been taken once previously.  There was a lot of drama with the meth–heads (once we got a better look closer up we saw the facial sores and telltale thinness) getting kicked off the bus.  She was “up” crying without tears, wailing to the ticket guy, and lolling on the floor.  He was in a dazed state sort of wandering aimlessly.  It took an hour for them to finish their calls and their drama and leave the station.  And I guess our bus was waiting on them, because our 20 minute break turned into more like 80 minutes.

Thursday

-We finally got back on the bus after midnight (13 hours into the trip), but people still had screens flashing, and were talking.  I finally slept lightly out of sheer exhaustion, but had a problem.  Suddenly, my stomach was really hurting.  And it had quieted on the bus except for some snoring.  I woke up because I farted!  This NEVER happened to me!  Once in kindergarten I accidentally farted in school and was mortified.  I tried to deny it, but Bryce Fuller called me out–which everyone knew anyway.  To this day I’m embarrassed about it.  Anyway, the leather seats amplified the sound.  I tried to remain perfectly still so I didn’t tip off anyone paying attention that it was me.  I was so embarrassed!  But let’s be real, in this crowd, on this bus–farting wasn’t the worst thing going on.  So I was embarrassed, but not as much as real life.  I was also so, so tired.  I hadn’t slept the whole day (16 hours) til then.  I drifted back off, but the same gas occurred twice more.  I audibly farted 3 times in my sleep!  I have no idea if anyone heard or if they knew it was me.  Some things are better never to know–I’ll tell myself they were sleeping and missed it.  But even so, I couldn’t go to sleep at all for fear of more gas.

road to UU

-We arrived in Salt Lake City at 6AM.  18 hours of travel and sleeplessness.

I’ll tell you about the trip and the return trips in another post since this one has gotten quite long.

AuD Interview Prep

23 Feb

Something has got to change!  I know it’s this swing shift schedule, but until that is possible, something else.  I slept almost 11 hours Sunday night, then was still so tired I took a 40 minute nap today.  I hate feeling low-energy and unmotivated so much!  I feel like I have more time then I’ve ever had before, but I’ve made very little of it.  By the time I almost catch up on sleep, I have to go back to work and that runs me down again.

Since September, I’ve tried to have good sleep hygiene and go to bed at the same time every day (12:30AM, b/c that’s what time I can on work days) but it’s for the birds.  I never adapted to becoming a night person.  Apparently you just can’t fight your body’s normal rhythms–and mine is an early bird.  My body wakes with the sun–no matter how tired I am.  And I’m very, very tired ALL the time.  So starting now (I took off work to go to my interview in Utah) I’ll be going to bed early on the days I can.

Here is my feeble attempt at preparing for interview questions I know I’ll get.  Normally, I would have liked to write good essay responses then attempt to memorize them to be super-prepared, but it’s just not possible when you’re tired all the time.  I feel lucky to have gained this much traction.  Anyway, I’m telling myself, too rehearsed won’t be authentic, so maybe it’s ok I just have general ideas this time.  Besides–even if I do perfectly and get accepted–who knows if I’ll actually be able to afford to attend.  Bummer, but realistic (see Saint George awfulness).

I’m mostly worried about the travel logistics at this point:  Will the Greyhound be cold?  Will I have to pay $40 +++ to check heavy luggage (I HAVE to take interview stuff), can we drop the rental car downtown or do we have to cab it to the airport and back, does the hotel have an iron (and do I know how to use it?), will campus driving and parking be slow, will I have to wear interview flats in a snow storm?!  So you see how the questions are a little bit of an afterthought.  I figure I’ll have plenty of time to think about them on the 18hr bus ride. . .

UU AuD Timeline Poster

1]  What are your strengths and weaknesses?

-4.0 S&H GPA

-experience in the Speech & Language Lab at Riverpoint

-tutoring my peers

-ambassador (presentation, camp, hearing screenings)

-clinical experience at vet hospitals

-organizational skills

-communication skills

-more life experience

-ability to prioritize

-I want to speak about reading/typing outlines of all my textbooks prior to each semester to familarize with the material and have good notes.  Also mention how I’m on 422 days in a row of running at least 1 mile first thing every morning. But without saying something cliche that everyone else will say, and without using any word which also has a negative connotation.[disciplined (conjures violence or spanking too much), industrious, persistent (coming from a place of adversity/failure or stubborn), intrinsically motivated (over-used), enterprising]

Cons:

-undergrad GPA that doesn’t reflect my potential.

-Because I switched career paths after earning my undergraduate degree, I do not have as much observation experience as I would like.  I am eager to participate in all the available career avenues and hone my clinical skills.

-As a perfectionist I have tended to fret about things beyond my control in the past.  Currently I am making a concerted effort to prepare for the things I can, and let the rest go.  I think gratitude is an enemy of worry as well, so I am working on thinking about things I am thankful for rather then fixating on details beyond my control.  

Write them down to organize your thoughts. Compose examples and situations where you have excelled in demonstrations of your strengths. Do not dwell or belabor weaknesses. It would be better to talk about areas you wish to improve and skills you want to perfect.

-example scenarios:

-areas I want to improve:

-My undergraduate GPA doesn’t reflect my potential, but I feel like my speech and hearing sciences 4.0 shows improvement in my time management skills.

-Because I switched career paths after earning my undergraduate degree, I do not have as much observation experience as I would like.  I am eager to participate in all the available career avenues and hone my clinical skills.  

 -Right now I’m working on worrying less.  In the past, my perfectionism made me fret over details beyond my control.  Lately, I am trying to prepare for things within my control, then let go of the rest.  Instead of defaulting to anxious thoughts, I’m making a concerted effort to have gratitude for what has gone right and what I do have.

2.  What is it about this particular job that interests you?

-personal fulfillment of helping people like my Dad who have NIHL, Menere’s DZ, and PTSD.

-it’s more regulated and standardized then vet med

-opportunity to work in many different areas, and across the age spectrum

 -autonomy

-the strategic aspect of finding the appropriate tests 

-getting to actually perform the clinical tests

-My favorite part of audiology is continuity of care.  It is a health field where you are autonomous and responsible for the patient throughout the process:  collecting a history and using it to strategically find and carry out the appropriate diagnostics, instead of refering.  Then, the education about the condition and treatment is carried out by the audiologist, and finally, the overall communication is remediated by an audiologist in order to improve quality of life.  It is personally gratifying helping people through the entire process.

A question like this is a good segue into informing the interviewer that you know something about the facility. It is appropriate to mention areas of expertise for which the institution might be known and how they might be of particular interest to you.


3.  What do you want to be doing five years from now?

-Five years from now would be my first year, completely out of school, as a professional.  I hope to be working in a place that offers the most aspects of the audiologists scope of practice.  Under someone willing to mentor me as necessary, but also willing to let me be independent when I am able.  Since I have undergraduate loans, expect to acquire more debt in an audiology program, and am confident I will have proficient skills, I also hope the pay in competitive.

-Before I cement a decision about what aspect of the career I want to participate in, I would like to gain more clinical experience in a variety of areas.

-Currently, my biggest interest is aural rehabilitation/habituation, but I feel that should be applied to any part of the field.

-Though I am not locked into any particular area right now, I see myself using my meticulus nature to identify hearing, balance, and overall communication issues, using the best clinical assessment techniques, and remediating those problems using a combination of technology and a long-term humanistic approach.  I’m eager to learn about each pathway!

This is a commonly asked question, the answer to which can be very telling about your thought processes as well as personal organization. If you cannot answer this question, you are possibly indicating a lack of direction. It does not give assurance to the prospective employer that you are worth the time and money they will be investing in you.

4.  Tell me about yourself.

-I have a bachelors of science in Animal Science with a minor in chemistry from the University of Missouri.  More recently, I completed my post-bachelorrette in the Speech and Hearing sciences at Washington State University.  

-Working in the Language Laboratory at Riverpoint opened my eyes to the type of research being conducted in the field, and combined with my more hearing-based classes, got me excited to contribute to this base of knowledge.  

-I am excited to enter into a profession where I have autonomy and can conduct my own diagnostics, because that was one of my favorite aspects of being a (paid) veterinary assistant for 14 years.

This is another revealing interview probe. It is called an open-ended question. You are forced to choose what you feel are the important aspects of your life and experiences. These questions are not just revealing about your past, but also show how you think on your feet and conduct yourself. Stay on the right track when answering this question. Talk about your professional life and not your personal interests. Begin by reviewing your educational background, clinical experiences and academic accomplishments. Sounds like your resume? It should, but with a personal touch.

5.  What can you contribute to this job?

-Tutoring my peers in speech & hearing sciences, used a lot of the same skills that will be required of an audiologist.  I looked back at my notes, flashcards, and study sheets which required organization.  I compassionately sensed deficits, and confirmed them through sensitive communication.  Then, I presented information and tips in a coherent and entertaining way, paying close attention to learning progress, attention, and remaining confusion.

-the same meticulous nature that helped me transcribe language samples of toddlers and their communication partners in the language lab will help me analyze symptoms and histories and carry out the proper diagnostic tests in order to diagnose and remediate communication issues.

-the same compassion for people that I show for animals.

Your emphasis in answering this question should be on your strengths and accomplishments, and how they might integrate with the job and the facility.

———–

What made you decide to pursue a career in [your profession]?

-I found the profession while researching potential careers.  Audiology fit me best because I can directly help people and there are many areas within the scope of practice.  Also, it did not hurt that my Dad has had hearing loss for as long as I can remember and I was motivated to give people like him a better chance.

How did you investigate a career in [your profession]?

-I was very driven to find a career path outside of veterinary medicine, because I had never entertained any other options for myself.  I made a list of things I liked about the veterinary field and those I really did not like, and sought out a profession that kept the positive traits while minimizing the more negative aspects.  

+ using my compassion to help, feeling like I am making a difference, educating, performing diagnostics, having many areas within the scope of practice.

–no upward mobility without a higher degree, people seeing pets as expendable objects that aren’t worth treating, little regulation, unrealistic work hours

What skills have you developed outside the classroom?
How have your personal and volunteer experiences strengthened your goal to enter [your profession]?

I recently observed at the local ENT and left with more enthusiasm for the profession.  I recognized a lot of the procedures and diagnostic tests from my textbooks and lectures, but became excited by the people.  For instance, I had severely underestimated the adorableness of VRA just reading about it.  Seeing a 20 month old react with such delight made me anticipate working with a real caseload.  Working with a geriatric CI-user also made me excited to work with that population.  I had already been interested in the procedures and the science, but adding the people made it that much better!

What has been your favorite non-science course and why?

I always enjoyed writing.  It is a useful skill, and there are many formats to use and gray areas.  Also, I think it’s a good skill to have.

Why do you want to become a [your profession]?
What is the greatest obstacle you have had to overcome?

I applied to veterinary programs many times, and was either rejected or could not afford to attend.  It was difficult looking beyond my childhood aspirations to find practical careers that exemplified my talents.  It also required a lot of diligence and a positive attitude not to let failure hold me back a make me bitter.  I started from square one and put my all into speech and hearing sciences.  Not only was it rewarding to achieve a 4.0 GPA, and work as a tutor to help others, I feel like this was my proper place all along–I just hadn’t known it existed.

What teamwork experiences have you had?

-camp Na-Hash-Nee, campus health fairs

What branch of [your profession] most interests you?

I’m hesitant to pick one because I do not want to limit myself before I have clinical experience.  —So far I like aural rehab, but I think that carries over into every aspect.  

-Seeing the children during my ENT observation made me entertain working with them.  But I also liked working with the geriatric CI-user.

What issues confront [your profession] today?

-I am reading a lot about insurance companies only covering one hearing aid for people with bilateral hearing loss.  At the same time I am seeing more and more research on the relationship between hearing loss and clinical depression and dementia.  I think the latter research will give more legitimacy to the audiology field and hopefully, with that appropriate funding will follow.

-Also, I read that the average person waits 7 years between the initial diagnosis of hearing loss and getting fitted with a hearing aid.  The dementia research in addition to the quick rise of technology, may help motivate people to get help sooner.

Why are you interested in this particular school?

I think it is important to gain clinical competency as early in school in possible, and I like University of Utah’s model of shadowing a 2nd year student during the 1st semester, then gaining direct hours starting the 2nd semester.  

I also read each student has clinical placements in 3 different settings prior to their 4th year externship, and I think that would be invaluable experience.  

Finally, the psychoacoustics and receptive speech research labs present unique opportunities to gain more knowledge and present possible funding opportunities that could offset tuition costs.

What have been the strengths and weaknesses of your college preparation?

-My hard-science classes such as chemistry, physics, genetics set me apart from many students and give me good background information for audiology.  

-My psychology courses combined with community service, teaching, tutoring, and veterinary experience prepares me well for human interaction across the age spectrum.

-If I had to determine a weakness it would be my undergraduate GPA.  But that number does not reflect what I learned from those courses, or my ability to succeed in a difficult program.  That GPA is actually a strength because I earned it while working at a demanding veterinary job (sometimes 3 at a time) and while participating in community service and extracurriculars.  I have shown that I am capable of earning higher grades, even while working, now that I’ve done it for years now.

What is your biggest concern about entering professional school?

Because I am not independently wealthy, I am concerned about my student loan debt accumulating to an unmanageable level.  Because finances play a big role, I am willing to do whatever it takes to secure the best package I can for myself.  That said, I came from a pre-veterinary background, where veterinarians (very competitive and saturated in small animal private practice jobs) are paid relatively low, and have the highest debt to income ratio of any professional.  Just as I wasn’t then, I am not in it now, for the money.  I am actually happy with the average salaries earned by audiologists and confident the AuD will enable me to secure a good job in a timely fashion.  

What has been your greatest achievement?

I am proud about earning 10 scholarships.  Because I am not independently wealthy, I worked very hard to apply for every scholarship I was remotely qualified for, and it paid off.  

Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

Describe an experience you had helping others.
If you are accepted to multiple schools, how will you make your decision?

I would love to pick the school that offers the best research, most varied clinical experience, and best externship opportunities, but ultimately I have to keep an eye on keeping my student loans to a minimum.

What have you read recently in the press about [your profession]?

-England’s audiology troubles:  More patients, less time/patient, and insurance covering only 1 hearing aid.

-How technology is evolving and smart-phones are being adapted to ALDs, mouth-gadgets are being produced and studied to remediate hearing issues.

-I read a study based in Australia that showed initial audiology appointments are following a paternal model, instead of a patient-centered one, despite research that shows having a voice in the decision-making process increases patient-compliance.

What do you believe in?

-Primarily I believe in ethics.  That extends from upholding my personal values, even when it is not easy, to practicing audiology in a compassionate, humanistic way.

What do you care about?
How does your sense of caring express itself?
What is your favorite type of teaching style? How do you best learn a new subject?

-I learn best through tactile or kinetic practice.  I write vocab words or statistics on flash cards to study.  I also draw pictures of mnemonics on study sheets in order to learn information.  It helps me to see how something is done, then to actually do it myself with some guidance and support, then do it in repetition individually.  

Who knows you the best in this world?
How would that person describe you, and what advice have they provided you?
Who are your heroes?
What person, past or present, would you most like to meet?
What makes you a better applicant than others?
How do you relax?
Describe your best teacher and what made her or him unique.
What was the last book you read?
Describe an experience where you were misjudged.
Who are your senators? Congressmen? Governor?
What was your most difficult or demoralizing experience?
What is the difference between sympathy and empathy?

Sympathy is having compassion for another’s situation.  Empathy is actually feeling what the other person does because you have personally experienced a similar situation–it is more extreme then sympathy.

Is there anything you want to brag about or that you need to explain?
What is the toughest thing about being a patient?

Putting your health in the hands of another, and having to trust someone else.  I think this difficulty can be combated with a lot of communication combined with compassion.  If someone feels educated about their condition, diagnostics, and procedures they feel more in control of their fate.  If they feel compassion they are more at ease. 

What type of criticism upsets you?
Why did you choose this school?
What will you do next year if you don’t get into this program?

I will continue to observe audiology and apply to more schools in the next application cycle.

Is this school your first choice?
Is there anything I haven’t asked you that you want to tell me?

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What you should NOT talk about at the interview:

Good conversation keeps things lively, interesting and informative. However, there are some issues and topics you should avoid during discussions about you and your job.

Your personal life
Gossip about other professionals or job candidates
Politics (professional or general) and religion
Anything you know nothing about
Negative conversational topics
What about when it’s your turn to ask the questions?

You should be prepared to ask questions, not just to impress the people with whom you meet, but to find out some very practical details about the job.

What are the specifics of my job duties, and what is expected of me?
What are the goals of the facility?
Where is this facility headed regarding managed care?
How secure and permanent are jobs?
What sort of interactions can I expect from my supervisors?
Is research done here?
Is there support for professional growth?
Are there educational benefits?
What are other benefits like health, pension, sick and holiday leave?