Tag Archives: Jaycee Lee Dugard

I’m Sorry Jaycee Lee

15 Feb

Facts via “Shattered Innocence.” The book about the Jaycee Lee Dugard kidnapping/captivity/sexual abuse.  It was a more sensationalized account, but gave another valuable perspective on the story.  Mostly, I liked the acknowledgement of how deeply the Tahoe/Northern NV was affected.  It was also horrifying to see all the ineptitude listed in one chapter.  Here goes:

Phil Garrido received a 50 year federal prison sentence for Kidnapping Katie Callaway on the California side of Lake Tahoe and driving her across the state line to Reno where he had fashioned a “Porn Palace” in a storage unit.  He bound her with a leather strap for transit, then took drugs and raped her for 6 hours before a police officer stumbled upon the car with CA plates.

Garrido was released from federal prison after only 11 years.  He was sent to Nevada to serve time for the state offense of drugs and rape.  They only held him for 7 months before paroling him.  In 1999, parole was moved to California.  On four occasions (November 1999, July 2004, December 2005, and April 2008) California made requests that Nevada should let Garrido off of parole all-together.

Parole agents get a ten week training program, no field training, then are rushed into work where their caseloads are staggering.

Under conditions of his parole, Garrido had to submit to searches of his property at any time.  No prior notice or warrant was required for such a search.

During the first month of this transition from Nevada to California–no one looked at the Garrido residence, as was policy.  Worse, no parole officer ever visited the residence for the first year they lived in Antioch!  This could have been because CA mis-assigned Garrido to the minimum level of supervision instead of the high control status he was supposed to have.

No agent visited Garrido the six months from Nov ’99 to May ’00.  Phil merely visited the parole office on 3 occasions, submitted 5 brief monthly reports, and called on the phone once during that period.  It wasn’t until May ’00 that CA even realized Phil was a sex offender and should have been placed at a high level of supervision.  He should have been submitting to frequent drug tests all along, as he cited drugs in the rape case, as the primary reason for his behavior!

Another oversight were the mental health assessments mandated by the judge.  This was not done at all between 1999 and October 2007.

Still, between April ’01 and October ’03 no reviews were done at all!  Furthermore, between June ’01 and July ’02 no one even bothered to visit the Garrido residence as mandated.  From June ’04 to August ’05 there was only one visit to the house.

In June of 2002, the local fire department responded to a call that a juvenile had sustained a shoulder injury while swimming in the pool.  No juvenile should have been on a sex offender’s property.  Any parole agent had access to this report, but of course they didn’t bother to look.

There were at least 30 incidences in which emergency services were called to the Garrido residence, mostly to deal with Phil’s elderly mother.  Any of those agencies had an opportunity to see something amiss.  Also, parole officers have access to emergency reports.

On June 17, 2008, an agent went inside Garrido’s house unannounced.  His report stated inside there were Phil, Nancy, Phil’s mother, and “a 12 year old female.”  Again, sex offenders on parole are not supposed to be near children.  And when questioned who the girl was, Phil said it was his brother’s daughter.  The parole agent did not contact the brother to confirm this–if he had, he would have realized Phil’s brother does not have a daughter.

On at least 10 occasions parole officers had not completed mandated reviews.  And in 15 more instances, reviews were performed, but obvious deficiencies were not corrected.  It was noted that of the 123 months Garrido was under parole supervision, 111 months were rated inadequate to departmental standards.

In fact, over the years, there were about 60 face to face visits at Garrido’s home, where Parole Officers took pictures of utility lines, cables, and telephone lines running from the house to a carport in the backyard.  This was not investigated further.  Not on a single one of those 60 visits!

Parole agents never once spoke to any of Garrido’s neighbors either.  If they had, they might have talked to Dennis McQuaid, who said at five years old, he spoke with a blonde girl in Phil’s backyard.  “She said, ‘My name is Jaycee.'”  Two other neighbors reported seeing under-aged girls at Phil’s house.  On November, 30, 2006, neighbor, Erika Pratt, called the police and said, “He has several tents in the yard with people living in them, and there are children there!”  The report noted she was concerned because her neighbor has a sexual addiction.  This is the infamous incident when police were sent to the house, and instead of checking the backyard, or questioning Phil, they warned him tents could be a code violation.

It wasn’t until 2008, that Garrido had to wear a GPS unit.  The unit used satellite to transmit location, speed of movement, and direction of travel to the department.  In a 32 day period the summer of 2009, Garrido’s GPS proved that he had left his home after curfew 14 times.  Worse, it showed he traveled well outside of his permitted 25 mile range, to Berkeley, Oakland, and San Francisco.

Most suspiciously of all, the GPS device showed that Garrido had gone to his “secret” backyard 30 times in just one day!  Between July 23, 2009 and August 23, 2009  Garrido’s GPS signal disappeared every night, for as long as 9 hours.  A parole agent learned of the GPS descrepencies and no action was taken at the time!

Back to the “secret” compound in the backyard:  In a federal file was a report of the search of Garrido’s soundproof shed.  This is the same shed Jaycee Lee Dugard was imprisoned and raped.  This search by federal agent, was not shared with state authorities, who were obviously unaware the property extended any further.

In July 2008, a regional sex offender task force did a sweep of the Antioch area, including the Garrido residence.  They searched the house and backyard, but not one looked past the 8 foot fence and into the secret compound.

In June 2009 (a month before Garrido’s arrest), a recidivism test was requested.  The test could estimate the likelihood rapists would re-offend, and was primarily used on prisoners requesting parole–not those already out on parole.  The test was not run until 3 weeks AFTER Garrido’s arrest.  Of course results came back as a high-risk of re-offense-ya think?

On August 25, 2009, when Berkley officers called Garrido’s parole agent, that agent did the worst thing possible:  He asked (an increasingly paranoid and erratic) Phil to come to his office the next day.  This could have alerted Phil to a problem and prompted him to run, or worse, hurt Jaycee or her two, young daughters.

Everyone FUCKED up.  And sure, the state of California paid Jaycee Lee Dugard an unprecedented settlement of 20 million dollars, but is it enough?  How can all of the damage be un-done?  Jaycee missed her childhood, was held captive in horrible conditions, and raped.  Nothing can change that now.  She has two children and a lot of emotional damage that can never be un-done.  None of this should have happened, and 20 million dollars won’t change that. . .

My Summer Reading List

24 Jul

My goal is to read 15 books this summer–Halloween is the end date.  I have to say, I got a slow start, given the first book was long and factual and was interesting but hard to get through.  Here’s my list so far:

 

Legacy of Ashes:  The History of the CIA, by Time Weiner

Weiner a long- time reporter for the NY Times devoted twenty- years to this book, and in the course of it read through fifty- thousand declassified CIA Intelligence documents. He also interviewed ten former directors of the CIA.  He points out errors made all along the way. Frank Wisner at the beginning ignored ‘intelligence gathering’ and sent during the Korean War thousands of hired agents to suicidal behind- the- enemy- lines operations. In the Bay of Pigs fiasco and in numerous other operations the CIA instead of providing hard, truthful contradictory analysis essentially worked to politically support a prior decision of the Executive branch. Speaking ‘truth to power’ has not been its essential strong point.   Weiner understands the difficulty of having a spy agency in a democracy where there is always a certain discomfort regarding covert operations. His argument is nonetheless not about the wrongness of having such an Agency in a Democracy, but rather about the too frequent failures of judgment and action.  This book is extremely rich , providing new insight into a great share of American post- war history. It touches upon almost all the major conflicts. It also chronicles CIA successes wherever they have occurred, It is not in other words a one- sided politically motivated bashing of the Agency but rather a thoughtful, informative, challenging study that may provide valuable guidance as to how the Agency should be reformed to better confront the many security challenges the U.S. is facing today.

 

Promiscuous:  The Secret Struggle for Womanhood, by Naomi Wolf (author of The Beauty Myth)

This is an incredibly empowering book for women. No longer do we need to think of ourselves in a manner of either being a virgin or a whore. I only wish I would have read this three years ago, before I became desperate not to be seen as the former. The history of women’s sexuality was particularily wonderful. Though I took sex ed in the 80s and 90s, we still were being taught that it was always the boy who made the first move, and it was up to the girl to say no. (In other words, it is her fault when things go all the way.) It is depressing that no matter how far we come, we still regress back to that. This book should be required reading for every sex ed teacher, every school-aged girl, every school-aged boy, every parent. Want an insight into the mind of a female teenager? Things haven’t changed much since Wolf was a teen 30 years ago. This book changed — probably forever — the way I view matters of sex and sexuality.

 

A Stolen Life, by Jaycee Dugard (read in 4 consecutive hours)

“A Stolen Life” is told with unflinching detail. Readers will be unnerved by the failure of a Justice system designed to prevent predators like Garrido from abusing our children, and enraged by what the Garrido’s did to Jaycee – losing her life and identity (she could not say or write her name but had to use a given name, Allisa) – and to her mother – who never lost hope. Jaycee can still hear the lock of the door of the soundproofed building she was forced to live in behind the Garrido’s house and the squeaky bed on which she was repeatedly raped by Garrido – “the demon angels let him take her so he could cure his sexual problems. Society had ignored him. Now, he did not have to go out and molest other little girls.” The sounds and smells of her existence don’t leave…they continue to haunt her.

 

First in Thirst, How Gatorade Turned the Science of Sweat into a Cultural Phenomenon, by Darren Rovell

Amazing how Rovell was able to piece together such a detailed history of a product which was developed in a basement over 40 years ago. The relatively unknown early history of Gatorade at the University of Florida was fascinating. And the behind-the-scenes account of the part of Gatorade that we all know about, the commercials, was equally interesting and entertaining. I found myself singing ‘Be Like Mike’ and reminscing about the great Jordan commercials. I definitely would have paid a premium for an accompanying dvd of all the great Gatorade commercials. If you have any interest in Gatorade at all, this is an absolute must read. If you are interested in sports, business, or just want a good story, then First in Thirst is also for you.

 

“A Stolen Life” book review

15 Jul

I bought Jaycee Lee Dugard’s book yesterday and had read it in one 4 hour sitting.  I was riveted.  The book describes her cold step-father, her naive life in Lake Tahoe, and the kidnapping in a few short chapters.  As a side-note, I had never even thought people could get their hands on a stun gun.  This was how she was grabbed so quickly off the street.

Like her real life, the majority of the book focuses on her subsequent captivity, torture, and sexual torment at the hands of the Garridos.  Not for the faint of heart!  When she describes losing her virginity to Phillip or his drug-fueled “runs” I felt disgusted, sick, and sorry.  Despite detailed descriptions of  seclusion and sexual abuse, some of the saddest portions of the book talk about pets she was allowed to have.  This guy gave the little girl cats, them took them away, cats were eaten by dogs in front of her, birds froze to death–her broken heart with each animal incident was palpable.  Jaycee Lee wraps up the book talking about her rescue and new life.

The book is very well written and I’m glad she shared her story.  The whole thing made me furious about Phillip Garrido’s many prior offenses, broken parole, and the apathy of the system in regards to his case.  He saw a psychiatrist 3 days prior to kidnapping Dugard and 4 days after he had taken her to fulfill his sexual fantasies.  Time and again he escaped consequences of his repeated, terrible actions!  It’s a good example of how rapists and pedophiles are irredeemable and should be put to death the FIRST time they are caught.  It would sure save a lot of innocence–and money.

After reading the book, I felt even more how this could have happened to me–any little girl.  Like me, Jaycee Lee was just a little blond girl in pink stretch pants.  The had large teeth, and a love of animals, especially cats.  I am so lucky that it wasn’t be grabbed from the bus stop!  My heart goes out to the Dugards, and I hope both Garridos suffer greatly before they burn in hell.

I MUST have it!

12 Jul

Jaycee Lee Dugard’s book, that is.  I am going to a bookstore this Thursday to find, and purchase this book.  Since I lived in the area she was kidnapped, I feel like I could have easily been her.  I was just lucky. . .  I will let you know how it is when I’ve read it!

Jaycee Lee Dugard [posted 9-2-09]

17 Jan

Here is a half-poem/half list of my feelings on the Jaycee Lee Dugard story:


Infuriated with the case of Jaycee Lee Dugard.  Mostly because it never should have happened.

.. ..

Saddened that Phillip Garrido’s first wife didn’t press charges for battery or for the time when he tried to gouge her eyes out with a safety pin.

.. ..

Horrified he kidnapped a woman, dragged her across the California-Nevada state line and repeatedly raped her in his “sex palace.”

.. ..

Terrified that Phillip was calm and collected when a Reno police officer stumbled upon his rapist’s lair.  He told the officer she was his girlfriend, as she screamed for help in terror.

.. ..

Exasperated the judge in the Callaway-Hall kidnap/rape case ruled to exclude the first attempted kidnapping, meaning Garrido was not on the books as a repeat offender.


Astonished that “Crazy Phil” only did 11 years of a 50 year sentence when he did such a violent crime, and had prior offenses.

.. ..

Angered that Nancy, (obviously disturbed) married Garrido while he was in a Kansas prison.

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Incredulous that Garrido was transferred, mid-sentence, from a maximum security facility in Kansas to Carson City, where they so obviously dropped the ball.

.. ..

Astounded that Carson City not only released Garrido on his 4th parole attempt, but they let him leave the state and go live with his mother in California.

.. ..

Furious staying away from children was not a term of Garrido’s parole, because the woman he raped for 5 hours straight was 25 at the time.

Pissed that Garrido drugged and raped a 14 year old (4 years prior to Jaycee), and was released because she didn’t testify against him.

.. ..

Disturbed that an 11 year old Jaycee Lee Dugard was grabbed (by a woman) from her bus stop, in the sight of her father.

.. ..

Alarmed that the Garridos swiped a child in plain daylight, then were able to just drive home in the same car without lawful intervention.

.. ..

Amazed that with the palpable fear in Lake Tahoe, neighbors who saw Jaycee Lee didn’t recognize her as a missing child.

.. ..

Startled that neighbors or law enforcement had no idea of the “secret backyard,” when it was visible on google maps.

.. ..

Disheartened that nearby residents left well enough alone, and learned to live with tents and sheds, weird noises, and children in the backyard of a known sexual predator.

.. ..

Shocked that Garrido masturbated while looking at children in parks, schools, restaurants, and drive-ins.

.. ..

Stunned Garrido’s mother and his wife stood by while Phil harbored and raped a child.

.. ..

Flabbergasted that a parole officer checks a sex offender with a sketchy, kidnapper’s past, but does not walk through the entire house and yard on every visit.

.. ..

Staggered that Nancy Garrido still kept Jaycee Lee captive when her husband was thrown back in prison for a parole violation.

.. ..

Infuriated that a person could get a 50 year sentence, be released on parole after only 11 years, BREAK the terms of that parole, then be re-released in a matter of months.

.. ..

Dismayed to think about the emotional, and physical damage that must have occurred when Phil made Jaycee Lee pregnant at 14 years old, then made her give birth in a filthy tent–twice.

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Troubled that when children and prostitutes were disappearing near a known sex offender’s home and work, nobody thought to connect the dots and investigate.

.. ..

Affronted by the fact Jaycee Lee Dugard worked for Garrido’s printing business, met with clients, spoke with them on the phone, and wrote e-mails, yet no one recognized her as anyone but “Alyssa.”

.. ..

Disappointed the system lost track of Garrido’s sex offender status when someone DID call the police on Phil.

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Upset that people thought “Crazy Phil’s” crazy behavior and religious ranting were harmless.

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Confused at how Garrido (a registered sex offender, who wore a GPS monitor) was able to parade 2 young girls around town, and even take them to a birthday party, and no one sensed anything out of the ordinary.

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Wonders if anyone in Antioch reads the news when I hear stories of Jaycee going to the store or a college campus with Garrido.  Especially when her kidnapping was all over the news in Nevada, a whole state away.

.. ..

Anxious to think “Crazy Phil” was only caught because he wanted to be.  Why else would he bring a kidnapped girl and two children of rape to a college campus and a parole meeting?

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Revolted at the audacity it takes to not only plead innocent to 18 years of crimes, but to call the story “heartwarming.”

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Annoyed when I hear the media call Nancy Garrido the “true” monster because she allowed this to happen.

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Upset some members of the media are blaming the victim for not escaping or trying to reach out in some way.

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Tired of hearing psychiatrists and media diagnose Dugard with Stockholm Syndrome, despite never meeting her.

Hungry for more facts about the case and all the people involved.

.. ..

Disgusted that informants are now requesting the media pay for any information.

.. ..

Eager to see what Jaycee Lee Dugard looks like today, after having grown up seeing her missing posters.

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Excited to hear what Jaycee Lee Dugard has to say about the entire situation.

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Suspenseful to find out if the Garridos will get the maximum sentence and really suffer for what they did.

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Hopeful that Jaycee Lee Dugard and her two (unfortunately named) children, Angel and Starlight can fully recover from their ordeal.

 

Traumatized [posted 9-1-09]

17 Jan

I’m not certain why I feel so invested in the Jaycee Lee Dugard case.  Maybe the event traumatized me in my childhood.  Maybe it’s because it could have easily been me.  Maybe I feel so strongly, because it was the first really terrible thing I knew about–it was the end of my innocence.

.. ..

I remember when Jaycee Lee Dugard was kidnapped.  She was 11 and I was 6.  I identified with the girl:  We were both blond, both petite girls who were in elementary school, both had slightly big front teeth, both of us loved cats, both had a sprinkling of freckles, both of us had unusual names.  When she was taken, Jaycee Lee was wearing an outfit I regularly wore—pink stretch pants and a pink shirt.  She was snatched from Tahoe—I went to Tahoe with my family often.  The face on that poster haunted me.  It was familiar, and reminded me of what could happen—how vulnerable I really was.  She was taken while her father watched—how could I possibly feel safe again?  I felt as if she was just a little more unlucky than me—that time.  I suppose everyone felt this way.  Most little girls fit that description, no little girl thinks she will be taken away from everything.

.. ..

I also remember the resulting panic in the community.  The event was splashed all over the news, everyone was talking about it, parents in the area went into protective mode.  Fear was palpable.  There were pink ribbons and “missing” posters, featuring that little girl, on every doorway, window, and bulletin board in Lake Tahoe.  I don’t think there is a single person from Northern Nevada or the nearby California area (1991 to 1995, especially) that wouldn’t recognize Jaycee’s smiling face.  For years afterward, Tahoe looked for any sign of Jaycee Lee.  Every young girl (and her parents) worried SHE could be next.

.. ..

Things changed when Jaycee Lee Dugard disappeared.  The area was no longer a rural area free from sickos and predators.  Fun at the lake or on the slopes was no longer as carefree as it had been.  Kids were no longer safe to go anywhere (even the bus stop) alone.  They weren’t even particularly safe if their parents were watching.  I had to constantly hold someone’s hand when we visited Tahoe or Reno.  New reports gave suggestions on kidnap avoidance, stranger danger.

.. ..

I ALWAYS wondered what happened to Jaycee Lee Dugard.  The case was close to my heart, and also piqued my curiosity.  When I found out some answers, I was relieved.  Not especially relieved she was alive (because maybe death would have been a blessed end to her suffering) but relieved to KNOW.  Now, I’m troubled at the circumstances that led to her miserable 18 years of captivity.  That’s the next blog though.