Tag Archives: rachel platton

23rd Up to 17th Top 2017 Albums

10 Jan

#23-Eisley I’m always a big fan of how so many voices in the band come together.  I’m Only Dreaming reminds me of the album that the Princess in Super Mario Brothers might be listening to while locked in the castle.  It’s got a fantastic, whimsical sound.  As always, the songs stick with you but are also good background music.

#22-Minus the Bear

Truly alternative music.  VOIDS isn’t nearly as dark and depressing as 2012’s Infinity Overhead, and that’s a good thing.  But it didn’t hit that spot in my psyche like it used to.

#21-Emily Saliers Her first solo album is really exciting to me!  I have been a long time, huge, huge fan of the Indigo Girls (and I’ve always thought that Emily was the better writer and singer of the two).  I mean, there’s really no comparing Amy and Emily–they are different and each have their own strengths.   But I figured if I liked Amy’s solo material than I would really, really like Emily’s.  Murmuration is a little on the sentimental side.  A little folksy and quiet.  And most definitely an album that requires multiple listens before you feel attached to it.  It can try a little hard, like the line, “. . .  mother-phallic gun. . .”  I mean, I get it, I agree, but still. . .  I really love when the songs have violin, and I really like the Native American style wailing (if that’s the right thing to call it?  Sounds like powwow music) in some of the songs.  And I appreciate the story and sentiment in “OK Corral.”  For the most part, I’m on board.

Back at home, they’re shaking heads and asking why
He was so quiet, seemed like such a decent guy
A heart of darkness lies in wait in everyone
It opens like a hollow point when you point and shoot your motherphallic gun

#20-Pink I didn’t intend to make this blurb full of backhanded complements (though I have).  I have been with Pink for her entire career, from the competition with the bubblegum-pop Brittany/Christina set, to the introspective Funhouse, with songs like “Sober” that really evaluates a lifestyle.  And I like Pink with her “if you don’t like me, fuck you” attitude and edginess.  I know Pink may not be the most mature or marketable artist, but she is never phony.  My favorite thing about Beautiful Trauma is not the usual catchiness that makes Pink have a lot of radio hits.  None of the songs really struck me as stand-outs or singles.  It also wasn’t WHAT Pink had to say.  As a matter of fact, her song “What About Us” bothers me.  It’s unclear to me what exactly she’s trying to say, or who she’s talking to.  It’s a partially political, partial love song, but equates to saying nothing at all.  I can tell it’s a song written to appeal to the masses and say whatever you want it to say.  There’s no real message from Pink’s heart here–other than buy the album!  Speaking of buying, I’m disgruntled Pink is selling her worst concert tickets for $206! What. the. Fuck?!  But, but but!  The thing that I think is put forward in Beautiful Trauma is Pink’s singing.  It is perhaps her best vocal work yet, and definitely the album that showcases her pipes best to date.  She can really hit the notes, and does so in almost all these songs, and that’s really what the music industry should be all about.

#19 -Michelle Branch “Living a Lie” is ummm, sort of like No Doubt in the 1990s.  Its poppy but with a rebellious watered-down punk vibe, listen to “Living A Lie” = ska.  It’s a nice change for Branch.  “Not a Love Song” is a good ballad of regret and trying to get over someone, and very catchy.  I’m glad Branch is working again, and admire an artist that can successfully do adult contemporary, country, and alternative styles.  Keep it coming!

#18-Rachel Platton

Waves sounds very much like Taylor Swift’s new album.  The style is better suited for Platten, but “Whole Heart” is good even though it doesn’t match the intensity and uplifting feeling that “Fight Song” garners.  I can appreciate the sentiment in “Loose Ends.”

loose ends lyrics

And “Perfect for You” is a plea to take her as she is.

#17-Miley Cyrus

I’m surprised how high I ranked Younger Now.  Miley explores a more serious side here, more mature without being boring.  Her voice is different than any female vocalist around—very deep relatively.  A duet with Dolly Parton is always a crowd-pleaser and shows Cyrus still values and hones her country roots.  I would not call this album country, though.  If you had to categorize it Younger Now would be pop.  But not superficial pop.  “You’re Not Him” shows depth of writing and emotion.  “Week Without You” is about enjoying time away from a boyfriend and the ramifications of that.  I would like to hear more things from Cyrus not put out to instill shock and rebellion.

miley-cyrus-younger-now-video