Tag Archives: Riverpoint

A Lot Can Change In One Year

18 Sep

Last year at this time, I was probably heading into my first round of exams for my last semester in the Post-Bac Speech & Hearing Sciences program.  I had worked ALL summer on my application materials and was editing papers and really preparing as much as possible for an acceptance into an audiology program.

This year, I just don’t know.  I am sad I wasted all that money, time, and effort to just get put-off for the audiology track.  I thought that would be my thing.  Now I’m thinking it’s not going to happen.  Big-University’s have taken enough of my money, and really not afforded me opportunities.  I have an Animal Science degree that I pay for, but still don’t use.  And now I have a post-bac idea that isn’t a certificate, let alone a degree.  And I’m paying back those loans as well.  Besides the lack of ability to PAY for more school, I’m not big on the idea anymore.  And I’m reading a lot of things I don’t like about the audiology career.  Like 4 years of school, repetitive work, and a low ceiling financially.

Maybe the Audiology was just a means to get me out of the veterinary world.  But if that’s true, I feel like there should be a world opening up for me where I do fit in.  It’s seriously not fair.

Anyway, that was supposed to be an intro into the real post:  What are my priorities?

It’s good to have an idea of your priorities so you can arrange your life around them.  Make what’s important the thing that’s in your life most predominately.  It gives an idea of boundaries.  I really don’t know mine, just because I have no long-term plan yet.  So I’ll just talk about in the shorter term to have something.

armadillo plating

It’s important to me to keep running every day.  I don’t want it to get squeezed out of my schedule.

I want to see Cool often.

It’s imperative the apartment stays clean.

I need to make enough money to cover my bills.

This next 4-5 years is about saving as much money as possible so we can move to Colorado.

I would like not to have to take a step backwards into veterinary assisting if it all possible.

I’d like some dental and eye insurance.

I enjoy having some time off while Cool also has time off to explore this new city.

I want to be able to take an occasional trip to see our parents, or just some more states.

The kitties, obviously, will remain with us and well cared for.  So pet-friendly apartments are a MUST.

Sleep.  I want enough of it.  9 hours would be ideal, and I don’t want to sacrifice it.

I want to explore how to break into laboratory careers.  I like the work.  And I really like not dealing with the public–like a lot more then I realized I would.  Maybe I can get a simple (not big university!) certification that could get me in the lab.

I should also look into hearing instrument specialists.  I have no idea how to get into it, but they make just as much (or more) than audiologists.  And I started that ball rolling at Riverpoint, so it would be nice not to waste it.

building a bear

So I guess my priorities are my health, my relationships, and finding a job or career that I can pay my bills.

I Thought This Was It

10 Aug

My whole life I wanted to be a veterinarian.  So when that didn’t pan out, after time and time again of putting fourth my best effort–I was lost.  I didn’t know what to do with my life or what backup career I would chase.

retirement from vet med 012

And it took a lot of soul-searching and research to find an acceptable alternative–I just didn’t WANT to do anything that wasn’t animal related.  But Audiology made the most sense.  Sure, I didn’t love it in the same way and wasn’t excited about it like I was for animal work.  But nothing came close.  And it did spark my interest.  And in Audiology I could help people like my dad.  And there were a lot of great things about the career:  A stable schedule, more 9-5PM healthcare, higher salary so I could fight only my undergrad degree costs.

So I went to Riverpoint for 2 years.  And worked my A$$ off.  I really earned that 4.0 and for once in my life, made working the 2nd priority, which 9 times out of 10, was HARD.  I thought the grades would carry me into the next step of the program this time.  I thought with that 4.0 GPA, no admissions would reject me again.

But grades weren’t all I had.  I still participated in the extra-curriculars, volunteered, did extra for my program, observed professionals on my own time.  I had good letters from people I worked to know.  I even traveled out-of-state for the interview.

health fair 2014

And I was 14th on the list.  For a class of 12.  So 2nd on the waiting list.  Wait-listed AGAIN.  And even though I knew from multiple experiences what that meant, and how much of a long shot the wait list is–there was a teeny bit of hope.

Not a lot, but enough that I didn’t make any non-reversible plans or huge life decisions.  But in 40 minutes with the close of business hours, the wait list is over.  I will not be joining the Audiology doctoral class in 10 days.  I feel sad.  Sad for wasting all that effort at Riverpoint–not to mention incurring even more student loan debt on an education I can’t use.  And I’m relieved.  Because 10 days to get ready for a rigorous program is not a lot.  I didn’t have a loan for tuition, didn’t know how to make rent when students aren’t allowed off campus jobs, didn’t have books or a parking permit, and forgot far too many concepts and details of my hearing courses.

But mainly I feel lost again.

I’m not sure where to start over.  I can’t really pay for more school after the big move, and I’ll probably never go back to a big university, because for me it just hasn’t been worth all the money.  But what about a technical program?  Community college?  A job?  And in what area?

So again I’m left with a lot of questions and no real direction.  All I know is something has to happen soon.

Best Moments of 2014!

30 Dec

It was a good year, though not in the way of travel and events.  It was just a nice, stable year (for me, Cool was swinging up and down rapidly) which is what I needed.  Here are the bigger moments that were important from 10-best:

#10:  Getting to snowboard again

EZ123 3rd snowboard 118

I love being good at things!  And the instructors said I was a fast learner, and I felt confident on the slopes.  It was good to be back in the bindings.  Cool’s accident and resulting ambulance ride, emergency room visit (and those bills) lower this 2014 moment to closer to the bottom of the list.

#9:  Bike Swap and Snowboard  Swap

bike swap 4-10-14 017

These were really exciting adventures!  The research, the shopping, the event.  And the dreams for our future sports endeavors–not to mention our purchases were super-fun.  And Cool and I got along famously at both–no bipolar issues these weekends-whew.

#8:  Finishing my post-bac at Riverpoint (and keeping my 4.0 GPA)

CN ref both flaps open

The anticipation had been killing me.  I looked forward to this for TWO years, so when it happened it felt pretty sweet.  This is low on the list because the huge accomplishment (in my mind) was a little underscored by others and didn’t receive the acclaim I felt it deserved.  Finishing 27 upper-level courses in an entirely new and unfamiliar field–WITH straight A’s is a big deal in my mind–even if it didn’t garner me an actual degree.

 #7:  Two DMB shows–with SEATS.  And Brandi Carlile to open both shows.

celebrate we will 3

Usually this would take the #1 spot–and having 2 shows with seats–it SHOULD.  But Cool and I had probably our worst fight ever the first Friday so it’s not the perfect memory I anticipated and desire.  Obviously, it still makes the list because, hello, the Gorge, Brandy opening (and acknowledging our sign), DMB, the setlist game, merch, and SEATS!

#6:  Being named a finalist in a noise-induced hearing loss prevention poster contest!

NIHL color pic

I enjoy showing my creativity, and who doesn’t like winning something?  My poster will be featured at the annual AudiologyNOW conference and may even win!  In which case I get all proceeds for the life of the poster.  It’s cool and it’s exciting.

#5:  The relief I felt when I quit veterinary assisting

retirement from vet med 013

Even though the financial consequences were scary, I instantly felt better.  Removing those toxic influences was difficult, but well worth it.  It was time to go, and I’m in such a better place since I did.  I just had enough, and it feels good to be away.

#4:  Going to MT over Independence Day and My birthday

Cool Grizz attack

This one’s slightly lower, because before we left home, Cool was an irritable turkey so that puts a bit of a damper on the memory.  Pow-Wow is always fun, but this item is down in the rank because I had a bad allergy attack.  Leaving pow-wow to stay at a hotel in Missoula was amazing.  One of the best showers of my LIFE!  The bathtub was full of dust, and my allergens (temporarily washed away).  It felt nice staying in an oversized room with a TV and sleeping in a cozy bed instead of car-camping at the pavillion.  It was partially so nice because it was an unplanned treat and everything fell into place nicely–which rarely happens to me.  Also seeing how adorable Missoula is over my birthday weekend, and dreaming of “summering” there was exciting.

#3:  Satisfaction of running 1 mile every day of the year

house-sitting post run

It’s a really big deal, because not only am I really busy most of the time–I’m lazy.  I’m very proud to remain in shape, counter my poor eating habits, and do something not that many other people are able to achieve.  I’m going to see how many days in a row I can keep this up.

#2:  My parents visited!

Dad's 70th B-day visit 020

We had a week full of family activities and my dad turned 70!  Everyone (except Aunt Linda) was on their best behavior and I felt like a real family unit.  I loved that everyone had fun and Cool was made to feel 100% part of the family.  And all the free food and fun activities didn’t hurt my feelings either 😉

 #1:  The Sky-Fest Air Show

loading docktraffic jam in the sky

Was a genuinely amazing time, not ruined by bipolar, sunburns, or lack of funds.  Cool and I were together and both of us happy and excited.  We got to spend the day outside, and tour the planes, and spectate at the shows.  We got burned and thirsty, but we were still in great spirits.

My First Day Curse Lives On

25 Aug

I didn’t think I would have first day of school problems on my Sixth semester.  I was wrong.

walk about day 2 002

I got an invitation to the online course manager last week.  But the course was grayed out as “future courses” so I figured it would be activated ON the first day of school.  I kept checking back, but even as last as 10AM this morning, neither of my classes were live yet.  So I figured the profs didn’t activate them yet.

Every semester Riverpoint posts the room designations on a common board, not the internet.  This has caused some confusion in the past, but after five semesters–I was prepared.  I wrote my class names, numbers, times, (all given info) on a post-it and went to school a half hour early to write the room numbers.

When I got to school–there were no classes posted.  I wandered the lobby, trying to appear cool, not lost.  Finally, I had to go to the help desk–for the 6th semester in a row.  They wrote my room numbers below each course on my post-it, and still early, I went to class.  

No one was there yet, but I was about 45 min early so I hung out and waited.  I began to get nervous half hour til when nobody else had arrived yet.  But my program has all the same classes, and many are in a row.  So I figured everyone else was probably in the same class and it was likely to get out at 10:50AM, ten min before my class started.  So I thought I’d wait to panic until around 10:51AM.

I knew there was trouble, when there were still no students at 10:50AM.  So I went to the help desk in that testsbuilding to confirm if a class was in the room that was written on my post-it.  Nope, no 11AM class scheduled, and by the way, are you COMD?  Ironically, COMD stands for Communication (Disorders).  And the disorder part is fitting.  The gal behind the counter said no COMD courses had been inputted into the main system.  Of course.

So with 2 min until class started, I had no idea where I was supposed to be.  Again.  This is so typical!  But my new advisor is nice and actually likes me, and is welcoming, so I thought I’d go all the way across campus and ask her where my class was being held.  

When I got to the hallway of offices, I noticed a physical paper taped to a door.  With the COMD class designations–ugh.  Except nobody had told me this was a thing and they had never done it this way before, so once again I had been out of the loop.  Annoying.  Typical.

I got my room numbers, but didn’t recognize the building abbreviation.  And the key had been cropped on the sheet.  Great, so now I knew the location, but still didn’t.  I took a stab and just went to the next building, the nursing building, hoping for the best.  I was already 5 min late, and my lateness phobia was really in high gear.  Again.

communication modeThe trouble with the nursing building is none of the doors have windows of any kind.  And the door opened at the front of the room.  Meaning, I had to bravely open a door not knowing who was in the room, while all the students in the room faced me.  Not awesome.  Also, I’ve had all but one professor, and this happened to be the class that professor taught.  So I wouldn’t recognize if the instructor was from my department or not.  Also, it’s a brand new class of students so I wouldn’t recognize faces either.

I opened the door, stood and looked, but didn’t know one way or the other if I was in the right place.  And the prof was talking so I couldn’t ask without interrupting further–I just had to sit down and hope.  The first thing I heard was–let’s go around the room and introduce ourselves.  Uh-oh, if I was in the wrong place, I was about to be publically humiliated.  Again. 

The first lucky thing happened, and the first student said something about SLP, confirming I was indeed in the correct place.  And I didn’t want everyone to think I was some late loser so when my turn came I said, “Sorry I was late, they sent me to a different room across campus.  I was actually early, just in the wrong place. . .”  

But the first thing the instructor wanted to do was go over the syllabus–which was in the online course manager.  And she said, raise your hand if you DON’T have it.  So I had to–and look like MORE of a loser.  Apparently, I was having computer problems, it wasn’t happening to everyone.  

In another part of class, the prof was troubleshooting some technology (the 1st day of school is a technological, logistical treat for everyone) and told us to turn and get to know our neighbor.  I was on the end of a row.  The gal next to me–turned her back to me to talk to the student on the other side of me.  Leaving communicationme with no one to turn to.  I looked at the row behind me, but those students were set in about 3 seats and talking to each other.  And there were already 3 girls talking to each other in the row in front of me.  So another great start at meeting anyone this semester *sarcasm* per the usual, I was awkward and didn’t get to know anybody, and with time it gets increasingly awkward.  And in this class we have to do dissections and stuff so I’m sure we’ll have to partner up.  And like always, I’ll be the odd-man out that doesn’t know anybody.  Today, really made me remember just how awkward and unfriendly my campus experience has been thus far.  I’m hoping I can show up early and chat with someone before class Wednesday to break the awfulness-lone wolf thing I’ve got going.

After class, I went to sort the online manager business out with my advisor.  As I said before she is really helpful and likes me, so I knew she wouldn’t mind–and I knew IT would respond a lot faster to an advisor then to one of the million students having problems on the first day.  I needed that syllabus!

When I did, she was super-nice as expected, fired off an e-mail, confirmed tomorrow’s room with me. . .  Then told me she’s moving.  In September.  She looked really sad when she said it, and told me she considered me a peer since we’re close to the same age and I’m so driven, and that she’d miss me and this job.  I didn’t want to upset her by conveying my severe, severe disappointment, so we talked about TN and how I’d really liked it when I visited it for the Bristol Night Race.  She sincerely offered Cool and me a place to visit anytime, and I left.

My new advisor was the first person to make me feel welcome and like a person at Riverpoint.  She’s the only person that is happy to talk to you or schedule a meeting with you or assist you.  She really added a lot of warmth to an otherwise cold place to be, and I’m really going to miss her.  Also, I will have more days like this without her to help me get some info around there.  I’m thinking of maybe writing her a nice card and or sending her flowers or a food basket or something.

So my last semester at Riverpoint–and more shenanigans were had. I REALLY hope the semester is not more of the same!

Interactive Audiology Presentation

2 Jul

I had another presentation today.  This one was for one group of high school students, and one group of (cue scary music:  dun, dun dun) middle school kids.  It was also shorter–like half the time we got last week.  And I knew I could do a YouTube video, but I think that’s kind of a cop-out, especially with younger students.

I knew I wanted to get the students out of their seats, but didn’t really know how to teach ear anatomy, noise-induced hearing loss, or assisted listening devices like that.  I thought about pictionary, but that’s really for review material–not novel teaching.  I asked my mom and she said she only knew of active stuff for review and quizzing.  When I pressed her, she said she could do like 8 activities for math, but not anatomy.  Still, I asked her to give me a sample.  The very first thing she talked about was using manipulatives.  And my advisor had talked about how they had used a funnel to show the function of the pinna before with great success.  That got me thinking. . .

 

general ear anatomy

My Mom (maybe both of us?) came up with putting “pieces of the ear” in a paper bag and having them kids pluck them out–you know for the gross-out factor of reaching into a bag not knowing what you’re going to get.  Then I came up with all the little objects I could use to show each portion of the ear:

funnel for the pinna/outer ear

drum for the tympanic membrane/ear drum

a hammer for the malleus often called the “hammer”

I used a door stop and taped the anvil coffee logo on both sides for the “anvil”/incus

I had a tiny shoe keychain for the stapes/”stirrup” to show the footplate’s action

I put a brush in a ziplock and filled it with water to have a visual for the fluid-filled cochlea containing hair cells

and finally, a sponge was the brain

education at family weekend health fair

I had the kids pick the items and stand in the front of the room with them, in the proper order.  I moved my arms (next time, I’ll have all the students at the desks wave their arms to involve everyone) to simulate the physical sound waves, then, I went through the function of each part of the anatomy:

My ear canal/funnel person stood there capturing the sound

The drum bagged to show sound hitting & vibrating it

Setting my 3 ossicles (w/interlinked arms) in motion (next time have them hum like a kazoo to show the ossicles vibrating).

My stapes person kicked the oval window on the bag

The inner ear person created gentle waves to stimulate the hair cells to send the sound info to the brain

And my brain/sponge was dipped in the water of the bag/cochlea to show the sound reaching its destination.

loudness vs intensity

Then, we did the whole thing again, but I jumped up and down exaggerated to show LOUD sound.  Everyone exaggerated their motions, the stapes footplate stomping the oval window to create a tsunami and flatten the hair cells.  And that time the sponge (a 2nd sponge) remained dry and unhearing.  It got everybody involved, laughing, and hopefully remembering the hearing process a little better.  And I have to say I was on my A-Game, and really extroverted (not my normal way) and funny and in charge of the scene.

That allowed me to segway to the FM loop where the kids played Simon Says, one in the hallway and one in front of the group doing silly things.

fm trainer

I had a lot of fun, and felt “in the zone” rather then shy and nervous, so it was great.  I could see myself doing little activities to promote prevention as an educational audiologist in my future.  It’s not the same as having to discipline a whole class for an entire day, which is what I didn’t think I’d like about that option.  Now, if I can only track down one of the many videos of the thing so I can put it in my portfolio!

Camp Na Ha Shnee (and my presentation)

28 Jun

I cut & pasted various different articles to give you a good idea of what the camp is about.  Even though it didn’t fall on an ideal day (my Dad’s 70th birthday when they were actually visiting) I rearranged things, because this population is close to my heart, and the mission of the camp important.  Three of us presented for Speech & Hearing Sciences.  We wanted to introduce some aspects of the career (SLP’s have a very diverse scope of practice with a lot of subsets) AND simultaneously give the teens good health info for themselves.  So we focused of voice (anti smoking, tobacco,  & drinking), ears (noise-induced hearing loss, ipods in particular), and the brain (TBI = don’t drink & drive, wear helmets).  I think it went really well, and most of the students were engaged and excited.  Here’s that camp info I told you about:

snake dance 3

The result of an earlier student leadership exercise to give the summer institute a native American-sounding name, Na-ha-shnee is an amalgamation of the words Native American High School Summer Nursing Institute. It has no literal translation in any tribal language. Na-ha-shnee encourages Native American youth to explore and pursue a career in the health sciences while providing learning experiences with native health care providers as teachers and role models.Indian 1

Fewer than 20 Native Americans across the United States have earned a PhD in nursing. One of them, Robbie Paul, Native American Health Sciences director at Washington State University (WSU) Spokane, is dedicated to increasing the number of Native Americans practicing health sciences in the Northwest.  Native Americans represent less than .5% of the health care workforce, and the Na-ha-shnee Native American Health Science Institute is taking steps to engage and expose Native American students to careers in nursing, medicine, exercise physiology, pharmacy, speech and hearing, and more.

The camp is part of a larger effort to solve the shortage of health care professionals in the Native American community, said Robbie Paul, director of the school’s Native American Health Sciences program and founder of the camp.  Paul, a beadworkNez Perce member who has a doctorate in Leadership Studies from Gonzaga, said the camp aims to build confidence in students who might deal with teachers who have low expectations of them.

For more than 17 years, Native American high school students representing various tribes from the Northwest have been given the chance to participate in Na-ha-shnee. Participants in the Na-ha-shnee Heath Sciences Institute represent the Spokane, Colville, Yakama, Snoqualmie, Puyallup, Lummi, Umatilla, Blackfoot-Cherokee, Shoshone-Paiute, Cherokee, Turtle Mountain Chippewa, Shoshone-Bannock, Tlingit, Chippewa Cree and Siletz tribes. They come from Washington and Oregon.  The program encourages youth to try out a career in the health sciences by providing hands-on learning experiences with Native American health care providers and health science and nursing students.Montana-Nikon 247

When the camp first began in 1995, its sole focus was on nursing. However, once students began expressing interest in learning about other career areas available in heath care, the camp expanded to respond to these interests. Now, Na-ha-shnee includes workshops on nursing, medicine, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, exercise physiology, speech and hearing, and brings Native American health care providers in to be teachers and role models for the students.  The camp has grown from six to 12 days and added math, English and leadership training. Students also practice writing tiny tots 5scholarship essays and interviewing with admissions counselors.

Na-ha-shnee is open to high school students who will be entering the 10th, 11th, and 12th grades in fall. The application process includes a written essay on why they want to come to camp and also explaining their interest in health care. Applicants must also have a minimum 2.5 GPA, have at least taken Algebra I, and have at least a C in their math and science classes.  Traditionally offered exclusively to Native dancer 4American high school students, the program was expanded last year to include students from disadvantaged backgrounds. The Na-ha-shnee program partnered with Creating a Nursing Path, a program consisting of 27 high school students. Funded by a workforce diversity grant, Creating a Nursing Path is led by Janet Katz, PhD, RN, associate professor from WSU College of Nursing in Spokane. The purpose of this program is to address the need to graduate baccalaureate-prepared nurses from disadvantaged backgrounds

In its 19th year, the camp has participants from 13 tribes, some from as far away as Arizona’s Navajo Nation. Attendance has grown through recruitment visits to tribal and urban schools, word-of-mouth and the Internet, Paul said.  Of the more than 340 campers over the years, Paul estimates about 70 percent of them have gone on IMG_3847to college.

Paul presented the purpose of the camp as threefold: academic, leadership and cultural. For the latter, Paul uses stories to teach the students life lessons embedded in their tribal heritage.  Paul said that the experience is both an academic and social one for those in attendance. In addition to taking English, science, and leadership classes, students get to experience different aspects of college life such as living on campus, dorm life, and having a roommate.

First Essays, Now Silence?

26 Jun

What a terrible blogger I am this summer!  In order to get back on track and get a current post published I’ll go to bullet points (in no particular order):

 

-Today I’m tired.  I think the activity of the previous week caught up to me finally.

-I found out that my boss is going on vacation over Labor Dave Weekend (when we have SEATS for Friday and Sunday) ampitheatre 3and she found someone else to house-sit for 15 days.  I’m disproportionately disappointed about that because it is excellent money, easy work, and access to satellite TV.  I s’pose it’s better because I’ll be in school by that time and have daily class, so the commute would have been awful annoying.

-We had a really great visit with my parents.   I think they had fun too.

-If you haven’t heard of the “30 minutes to fitness” series by Kathy Coffey-Meyer–check it out.  Immediately!  I have Dad's 70th B-day visit 014never, ever watched an exercise video that didn’t annoy me.  Whether it was a catch-phrase, overall phony/annoying bubbliness, too hard-core, too repetitive, bad music, there are a lot of workout video sins.  Coffey’s vids don’t have any of that irritating stuff.  And she’s feisty and funny and motivating at the same time.  We have weights, cardio-blast, and kickboxing and I really like them.  And my mom was a real good sport and fully participated in plyometrics, which is HARD.  And she did awesome.

-At Dad’s (70th!!!) birthday dinner, our “Day’s of Our Lives,” jeans-model look-alike waiter did a magic trick that each one of us loved.  And one we couldn’t find on the web for at least an hour–a real feat in today’s technology.

-speaking of technology, I am still not convinced that Apple and smart-phones make life any easier.  If they’re off, slow, unanswered, or whatever, they’re useless.  I was no worse off without any gadgets than anyone, and they were not helped all that much.  I think it has more to do with status than anything.

-The kitties were as big and brave as they could be with frequent company on our apartment.  And Choco-Luv doesn’t EZ123 3rd snowboard 022have the herp (knock on wood)!  They are glued to my sides today though–with all the running around, I think they missed us.

-My parents gave me the most beautiful beadwork barrettes from various reservations along their route.  And my mom got beadwork from each place they stopped, which I am very envious of–and excited to inherit one day.

-I saw my former advisor in the hallway today, and she only managed to choke out a very obligatory “hello how was your summer?”  Lame.  And I’m so over that attitude from people at my school.  I am an awesome student and an asset to the program–she/they need to get a grip and grow up.  I’m not sure why she doesn’t like me, but she needs to act as a professional, because I shouldn’t even know she doesn’t. . .

-My aunt got super-sloppy at the extended family gathering, and was generally negative, complainy, passive-aggressive, and unwilling to exercise the whole duration of company.  But at least now everyone sees what I’m saying.  Maybe they thought I was exaggerating or a drama queen before???

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA-I was asked to do a presentation about the speech and hearing sciences for Native American teens ages 15-17.  It’s a group close to my heart (my people!) and I think it went well yesterday.  There had been a little snaffu in the beginning because a group member hijacked out “team” power-point, deleting/changing my every contribution and making me crazy that way.  I tried subtly conveying my feelings, and eventually had to be direct.  But everything was restored in the end and everything worked out.

-I always feel a little bit like a dud when you put me next to a bubbly, extroverted SLP student/teacher.  I am much more reserved and it really shows when I’m put up against that.  But my family said they didn’t get that impression and I looked good (and smart) so I guess it’s OK. . .

-I have another presentation on Tuesday, but I’m less excited because it’s 20 minutes long, which is almost no time at all.

-I have not worked on or even looked at my personal statement, scholarly paper, or neuroanatomy outline/drawings for 81.5-2 weeks.  Even though I’m sad my parents are gone, and think the visit was MUCH too short–I’m relieved to get to my normal routine soon.  After my next presentation, and oh–an interview.

-I have an interview.  Which was initially a real bummer because they wanted to do it on June 25th–my Dad’s milestone 70th birthday.  The birthday, my parents were going to be in town for (instead of 17 hours away).  Also the day, which this special presentation had fallen on.  And I had only agreed to do that because I think it’s important for Indians (only representing less than 1% on all health professions) are exposed to my program.  And the job is some random ticket agent, so I just told them I was out of town until the day my parents were gone.  And to my great surprise, they moved my interview day out to July 1st!  So I’m not sure what the job really entails or how many hours they want or what times, but depending on the factors I at least have a chance for a job.

-Cool went off her meds, and we all remembered that she used to have a personality.  So now she’s going to talk to her doctor and insist that whatever mood stabilizer she is put on does not have any drowsiness what-so-ever involved. Dad's 70th B-day visit 020 Bipolar meds are horrible in the fact they work by making you a complete zombie–which isn’t exactly quality-of-life.  We’ll see if this can be adjusted.  Oh and when she went off the meds, of course she vomited to the point of having to come home from work 2 days in a row = withdrawals.  So scary she has to depend on that to miss extreme highs and lows–I’m not certain which is worse.

-Despite a lot of dinners out, shopping trips, gifts, “visiting-type expenditures” I really managed to keep resigned in financially.  Partially because of my parents’ extreme generosity and partly due to sheer willpower.  I’m not nearly as behind as I thought I would be, and I even have some house-sitting money left over–which I in no way expected.

-My water consumption really suffered when my routine was thrown off.  I could stick with my exercise routine because it’s at home, first thing in the morning, but liquid availability, portability, and bathrooms make water really tough.  I have to get back into it in a hurry because my lips are always lizard-like lately.the 1 pic of both

-I have no idea what to do for my birthday.  Partially because 3-1 is anticlimactic, partly because I’m not sure if I’ll have to accommodate a job, or if I’ll even have money to do anything.  And I don’t know if this rainy Washington weather will cooperate at all–it’s rained all day today, and it rained from Cool’s birthday to the time my parents arrived a week later.  I guess I’d like to do something special–I’ll have to think on it.