Tag Archives: Speech & Hearing

Goal/Task Commitment Essay

10 Jun

6.)  Goals/task commitment: Articulate the goals you have established for yourself and your efforts to accomplish them. Give at least one specific example that demonstrates your work ethic/diligence.

Fish Transparent Skeleton Specimens 4

While holding a full-time job I took the junior-level course without having taken the prerequisites.  My pace had to be intense to catch up with the rest of my class, but my efforts paid off when I received an A in the course as well as a healthy dose of enthusiasm for speech language pathology.  My piqued interest in swallowing disorders combined with my experience using barium in companion animals, taking radiographs for the last thirteen years at veterinary hospitals, and observing endoscopies in horses, has me gravitating toward work with dysphagia patients at a skilled nursing facility or medical rehabilitation center.

Every weekend of my childhood, my father and I would have special bonding time while grocery shopping.  Checking items off the grocery list, comparing prices, and driving around to take advantage of the best deals was enjoyable, but I hated the check-out process.  My father would proudly say “This is my good helper-girl” to the tired cashiers who were unlucky enough to get scheduled on a busy Saturday or Sunday.  Then, the part I dreaded would arrive—the checker would read out the total.  I did not hate this part because we could not afford the items or even because my thrifty father fussed at the price.  Neither of those things ever occurred.  What did happen was my father’s inevitable, “What?”  The checker would repeat the number, and I would be so embarrassed, looking at the impatient faces waiting behind us.  My father still did not hear what amount he should write on his check.  My face would flush, and the cashier, desperate to get her lengthening line moving, would eventually turn the written numbers toward my father so he could see his total for himself.  It is from the mortification that I felt, that I want to help people with hearing loss.  My compassion for my beloved father motivates me to help others like him.

While holding a full-time job I took a junior-level course without having taken the prerequisites.  My pace had to be intense to catch up with the rest of my class, but my efforts paid off when I received an A in the course as well as a healthy dose of enthusiasm for speech language pathology.  Eager to commence my education in the discipline, I began preparing in May for my next course, Anatomy.  It was my self-imposed summer project to read and outline the pertinent chapters in the textbook, to attempt dysphagia recipes, and research different pathologies leading to dysphagia.  My piqued interest in swallowing disorders combined with my experience using barium in companion animals, taking radiographs for the last thirteen years at veterinary hospitals, and observing endoscopies in horses, has me contemplating attaining my Master’s Degree in Speech Language Pathology.   I envision myself gravitating toward work with dysphagia patients at a skilled nursing facility or medical rehabilitation center.

Currently, I am eager to take more classes to learn more about all realms of the Speech and Hearing Sciences before closing any doors on professional opportunities.  I know working in the field of speech and hearing sciences will be rewarding.  And I am quite certain my father will still be proud of his “good helper-girl.”

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Teasing Isn’t the Worst Thing

12 Apr

Let me distinguish teasing from bullying. Bullying is never OK, and it needs to stop. I would categorize it as persistent to relentless, threatening words or behavior +/- physical attacks.

We watched a video about children with hearing loss in class. I thought the movie really bent over backwards to ensure that none of the profiled were teased about their hearing aids. And I felt all of the parents were very preoccupied at the prospect of their child being teased. And I felt like that shouldn’t matter as much as they were saying it should.

CI flower

It is human nature to categorize and notice difference. There is RESEARCH that shows people rated most attractive are the most healthy. Humans learn to classify and notice differences in order to ensure genetic survival. Also, in order to readily see cultural boundaries or find “friendly” tribes. You can’t just un-do millenia of evolution.  You should watch this, because it is awesome and it is interesting–also it goes into the evolutionary categorization I’m talking about:

http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/other-shows/videos/other-shows-science-of-sex-appeal-videos.htm

Also, let me just say that I don’t think getting rid of teasing all-together isn’t practical and it may even be detrimental.

Every kid is “other” somehow: Glasses, gay, height, weight, athletic ability, pointy nose, etc, etc. . . Teasing isn’t limited to just one difference or one child. And I think it’s a good teaching point. When a child is teased you can remind them it’s their differences that make the unique and special person they are. You can also teach them that their self-esteem shouldn’t be tied to what others think [IMPERATIVE POINT].  Kids need to learn not to care about what others think. Also, even if adults are able to shield kids from all teasing (impossible) they are going to hear it at some point. They ought to be given the tools to cope with the situation, otherwise they will crumble at an older age when they don’t have an advocate.

My First Hearing Screening

3 Apr

The first I’ve administered I mean–I have probably taken part in school and stuff.  Though it must not have made much of an impact, because I don’t remember it at all.

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERASo I forgot about that elementary school slowing down traffic so much around 3PM! I got MAJOR lateness phobia because I didn’t get to my parking lot until 3:20!!!

 

And I’m so glad I chose the shorter slacks after all, because it was really wet & mucky and I would have had to dry clean the gray ones. But both my group members were in black slacks and black suit jackets! Damn them. But I was comfortable anyway.

And we got a senior grading us–luckily. I was so glad it wasn’t the professor! And she was really nice and was MORE confused then we were, and just let us sort of pick what we wanted to do! So that was good.

We did the child first and Jen picked to place headphones and gives directions to her own daughter so I got the easiest part–setting up and placing the chair. And when I placed the chair I sat down in it with the headphones to make sure they could raise their arm without getting tangled. So I raised my arms a couple of times, and I guess I did it in a funny way because everyone laughed. So that was cool and it broke the tension. We all got 100% on the first part.

Then we had the adult screen–and the other Jen chose to do all the questions and instructions on her own husband–so that was cool. But I couldn’t do the set-up again since I’d already done it, so I got to place the headphones and actually run the screening. So I put the headphones on properly.

I made sure my audiometer was set to all the right numbers and everything and pressed the signal so he could hear it. . . Maico MA-25 audmAnd he did NOT raise his hand! So it was already an instant-referral. I was like oh no! Because you have to finish that test, reinstruct, re-do the headphones, and it could be a total refer that finds hearing loss. Also–I was like–what if the headphones or machine are somehow WRONG???!

My hands started shaking and I was freaking out inside. Also, I was really sweating profusly because of the lateness-phobia nerves, into the being graded adrenaline, into the WHAT’S GOING ON-panic mode I was in.  So I did the 2nd tone–and NO response. No!!!!!!!! I did the 3rd and he finally raised his hand. So I thought–good at east we know things are set up ok. I switched ears and got confused. He responded and didn’t respond on THAT side too. And I was freaking out so much that I wasn’t writing the responses down immediately, so I couldn’t exactly remember which ones he responded to and didn’t–so at the end I just quickly jotted down R NR NR. But either that was how he had responded or our senior hadn’t been paying attention either, becuase she didn’t mark me off on that.

So then I had to take the headphones off and re-instruct–which I’m sure he was like–what is going on? I got it! Then I had to RE-DO the whole sequence. And luckily he responded to all 6 tones that time. I was so relieved!

And when it was all over my group and the senior was like–good job! You did so good with that! I don’t know why he didn’t hear those! So we talked and laughed and everyone was happy. And we got 100% on that too.

And we got to leave. As I was walking out I looked at my watch–only 10 minutes had passed! It went so fast!!! And I started to look if there was any observations starting at 4PM. You have to look on all our professor’s doors. I looked at the first door, and none started til next week. The second door didn’t have a sheet. Then, I got close to the 3rd door–and noticed the BITCH was right inside–and I didn’t wanna sign up with her, or hang around the hallway any longer because I would eventually have to address her–so I just hustled out of there.

greekAnd I went Hamilton so I could stop by safeway and get some B&J, but when I finally, slowly got up there–Safeway was packed so I was like eff that. So I guess I’ll have to have some fruit dip–and cry.

So that was the whole thing! Oh and in more bad news, the senior warned us we have to do this again, but with the threshold, which is more in depth. And last year they did it individually with our professor grading–so hopefully that’s not the case this year

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Different Areas of AuD

30 Mar

I need to make an informed decision about what type of audiology I might like to do.  When I was trying to gain admission into vet school, I always put small animal private practice (like the other 90% of applicants) because that was what I knew, what was easiest to get involved with, and that’s where most of my experience was at.  I want to actively choose my arena for Audiology.  So I went to the student academy of audiology website and here is what I found:

http://www.audiology.org/SAA/SAA_News/SAA_interviews/Pages/default.aspx

–>everything without ** in front of it is cut & pasted directly from the interview.  **are my thoughts and comments.

Beltone audm

AuD/PhD:
**absolutely not! That sounds like either double the years in school or double the credit-load. Financially, that would be awful to pay for that much more school. Personally, I want to start working much sooner!

Walking about-July 2012 034

Intraoperative Monitoring AuD:
–>there is only one non-medical profession permitted to provide monitoring independent of medical oversight? That profession is Audiology

-2. What is a typical day like?
No such thing really exists in the OR, and for me that is one of the attractions of intraoperative monitoring. Many surgical cases begin before the sun comes up and may last into the night
**I think I would like a more regular schedule then veterinary medicine allowed. I want a cemented schedule of appointments, and regular work hours.

3. you have to be able to think on your feet to overcome electrical fields generated by drills, suction devices, beds and operating microscopes in order to have a signal that is stable and useful in helping to guide the surgical procedure.
**I’m tired of being stressed to the max, and this scenario sounds panic-inducing.

Educational Audiology:

Her first opportunity to provide audiology services was with the Albuquerque Area Indian Health Board, providing itinerant audiology services to seven different Native American communities in New Mexico, Utah, and Southern Colorado for 13 years. She then went on to develop an educational audiology program for the Rio Rancho Public Schools in New Mexico and has provided educational audiology services for 20 years to students and staff.

**I think this sort of thing would be awesome in the short term!  I would love to help my people.  But I would want more stability eventually. . .

inner ear 2

2. What is a typical day like for you as an educational audiologist?
Every day is different, but I spend some time doing just some basic hearing screenings, repairing hearing aids, working with teachers to help them understand hearing loss, and working with FM systems. So usually about half of my day is out at one of the schools and then I usually return to my office to contact parents, write reports, and do more complete hearing evaluations. I have portable equipment that I take with me to provide some itinerant services out in the schools and then I have a sound booth and clinical equipment at my office to provide more complete evaluations. I don’t do any hearing aid fittings, but hearing aid checks and minor hearing aid repairs are a daily routine. I fit personal FM systems and provide monthly checks. Our district has purchased a number of classroom amplification systems for each school; three of our newer schools have classroom amplification systems in every classroom. So I do spend some time troubleshooting classroom sound systems and doing some teacher training with them as well.

**all of this sounds cool.  I wonder if I would miss actually fitting hearing aids, or if I wouldn’t love the fitting process in the first place.

3.  I am fortunate to have the opportunity to follow the students throughout their school careers. Some of my students I’ve seen since preschool and have graduated or are getting ready to graduate from high school and go on, so you get the opportunity to see how the students mature and hopefully become contributing adults. I have even tested the child of the first cochlear implant student I worked with.

**this would be amazing!  Unless you had to work with some sort of turkey, then you had to be with that person forever. ..

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4. What are some of the limitations and challenges in the field of educational audiology?
I think one of the most important things that we need to do is the communication and collaboration with the teachers and speech pathologists, and yet this probably one of the most difficult things to coordinate because of the teachers’ schedules. Teachers are being required to do more and more with less and less. I think that collaboration is probably one of the most important things that we can do to support our deaf and hard-of-hearing students, not only with teachers but also with ancillary staff. Finding that time to collaborate continues to be a challenge. And I think sometimes just for people to understand the impact of hearing loss on a student’s ability to access instruction is a challenge.

**I totally concur.  Talking to my Mom, she is excited to make changes or learn about audiology and hearing, but just didn’t know the info.  I think I might have an advantage in this because my Mom is a teacher so I can see both sides of the story and fill in holes.

5.  to get involved:  Educational Audiology Association-EAA is probably the best value. It provides such relevant resources through the listserv. EAA also provides summer conferences that provide not only continuing education but also the opportunity to network with other educational audiologists and to belong to a community of people who have similar experiences and common goals of helping deaf and hard-of-hearing students become successful.

real estate agent

Industry Audiologist:

1.  I am currently employed as a product manager at Phonak U.S. and what that means is that I work with traditional hearing aids (BTEs, RICs, ITEs) throughout their life cycle. I work with our Swiss colleagues and our research and development team to get the right materials and to develop the right products for the market. Then once it’s brought to market I work with our sales and development team in the U.S. to train them on what the product does so they can in turn train the hearing healthcare professionals. I also discontinue the products when that time comes later down the road. –

**In my mind, I thought this would be more testing industrial workers for noise-induced hearing loss–something I’d be interested in.  I see now this is a fancy term for “drug-rep” aka sales.  Hell no!

2.  I thought, “You know, maybe I should join a profession that actually talks to people as opposed to talking petri dishes.” sales representative

**I’m the opposite.

3.  working with the veterans was amazing as well.

**Though, I think I would like this aspect.  But you could find it in other AuD niches as well.

4.  My typical day is crazy! I don’t really feel that any audiologist has a typical day. It’s always something different, which makes the field so exciting. Right now my day revolves around a lot of meetings with different departments from research and development, to science and technology, to marketing, to market insights looking at what are the market needs of the hearing impaired and how can we use our products to best serve those. I do a lot of work with the development and marketing of training material. How do we leverage the material we have and what’s the best kind of representation of material, be it print or digital, that we can give to health care professional so they can in turn help their patients the best way they know how.

**no, this isn’t for me.  I wouldn’t like all the travel or commissions, and I couldn’t be super-phony to sell-sell-sell!

5.  6. What are some challenges of working for a manufacturer?
Two things come to mind: One is travel. Sometimes the travel is amazing, like Switzerland, sometimes it’s not. For a lot of audiology positions within the industry, it does require an extensive amount of travel. You have to be flexible in your lifestyle, and really want to do that. The day to day travel can wear on you, so you have to be prepared for that. From the health prospective, to the family prospective, you have to make sure that fits within your life and the lifestyle you want to have. The travel does afford you the opportunity to travel and meet people all over the world and to see how audiology is done all over the place. The other challenge is that I don’t get as much patient care as I would like sometimes. I got into audiology to help people. As a clinical audiologist you get to do that every day in the clinic. Sometimes as you’re away from that you want to reconnect to that every once in a while. Luckily, opportunities within manufacturing allow for that but it’s not every day. Sometimes you’ll see a patient every once in a while, either working with a validation group, or working on a research team, or also going to help a clinical audiologist in the field. Sometimes you crave that patient interaction, which is why we all got in this to begin with.
**Just like I thought.

dino CI

Cochlear Implant AuD:

I think what really drew me to cochlear implants was the science-base and how frequently the technology changed; it was constantly evolving.  I liked being in on the cutting edge of that and being a part of the research and development and making it possible for deaf individuals, who before had access to amplification, but not with the same success that we are able to provide them with implants, actually be able to achieve near normal speech and language.  So that’s what made me really focus on cochlear implants and make that my primary area.

2.  typical work day?
So on a clinic day, it would vary between going to the operating room and assessing the internal device in the packaging to make sure it’s a functional device, and then again checking the device once it has been implanted, and then assessing the neural responses from that individual using the cochlear implant after the surgery is complete.  Another thing would be a cochlear implant work-up where we would do a full assessment unaided but also with amplification primarily focusing on speech understanding and working toward whether or not that person was a cochlear implant candidate and then discussing with them the devices available and helping them determine what would be the most appropriate implant for them.  I also do cochlear implant activations where implant recipients come in after the surgery and have their devices activated or turned on, so that would be the first time that they would hear or have access to sound.  After that it would typically be mapping, so coming back in for follow-up and testing, either to document their benefit and performance or to adjust and change their maps so that they could have additional benefit from the implant.  On research days, I would also be working with cochlear implants, but it would be testing different protocols for mapping and programming and seeing if we can come up with ways of improving that and making it better for patients.

**I’m not very familiar with what this would actually entail, so I’m not sure if I’d like it.

3. What do you like most about working in CI audiology? 
I think I like the fact that it changes so much.  I like the fact that the technology is always advancing, so you’re constantly learning something new, whether it’s software or equipment or parts and pieces.  I like the fact that it’s not static; it’s something that’s different all the time.  And I really enjoy the fact that you get a long-term relationship with families, so you learn to get along with your patient and kind of establish that rapport and the communication to help them do better with their implant.  It’s a long-term relationship so you really get to watch them progress over time.  I really enjoy having that relationship with the patients.

**I also don’t know how I’d feel about constantly changing technology.  It’s good that improvements are constantly making things better for patients, but how difficult is it to keep up with the new knowledge?  Would you have to go to tons of classes and work with product reps a lot?  Because I don’t think I’d like that very much.

**As for seeing a patient progress over time–that would be very fulfilling and cool.

4. What are some challenges that you face in your practice of cochlear implant audiology?
I think a lot of it would be based on reimbursement from the hospital standpoint as well as from the clinic standpoint.  I think we’re always battling concerns that because of the cost of the device and the reimbursement that we receive, which leaves a big difference between the two, and the shortfall that we receive because of that, that the hospital may at some point limit the number of implants that we can do, and we would never want that to happen because we want to provide this device to as many people as possible and to all people that would be candidates for it.  I think that we are always struggling to have enough time and equipment to be able to see all of the people that are actually candidates.  We have a high patient caseload and we work diligently to see all of them.  I think the numbers are increasing, which is great, but being able to have the number of personnel and the equipment and the resources to provide those services continually is something that we are always looking to improve and make sure that we have.

**It would be difficult to keep up on changing state and federal level insurance intricacies, and I would HATE the business side of this!  I would not want to have an overwhelming caseload, pressure to implant as many people possible, or a struggle to get the funds I’m worth.

4.  there is a lot of job security—so I think you’re making an excellent choice that way—but primarily I think there’s just a lot of job satisfaction.  It’s a very rewarding field.  You’re able to provide so much benefit to a patient.  I think it’s exciting to see that.  It’s exciting to have a long-term relationship with the patients and their families.  I think the field itself is exciting because it’s constantly changing; it’s very dynamic.  You’re stimulated intellectually because it’s always challenging to learn new equipment and software and take on the new knowledge, if it’s out there, and incorporate it into your practice, but it’s also fulfilling because you get to work so closely with patients over a long period of time.

**It sounds good a bad to me, and ultimately I still don’t know enough to make a sound (pun intended) decision about whether or not I’m interested in this avenue.

maculae 1

 Vestibular AuD:

there is a lot of job security—so I think you’re making an excellent choice that way—but primarily I think there’s just a lot of job satisfaction.  It’s a very rewarding field.  You’re able to provide so much benefit to a patient.  I think it’s exciting to see that.  It’s exciting to have a long-term relationship with the patients and their families.  I think the field itself is exciting because it’s constantly changing; it’s very dynamic.  You’re stimulated intellectually because it’s always challenging to learn new equipment and software and take on the new knowledge, if it’s out there, and incorporate it into your practice, but it’s also fulfilling because you get to work so closely with patients over a long period of time.

**I would really like seeing a few patients, but in a very in-depth way.  I think it would allow me to do my best work, without all the scheduling and financial pressures.

3. What do you like most about vestibular practice?
Many patients with vestibular problems can be helped. I enjoy discovering a patient’s underlying condition, giving them a tangible diagnosis, and providing treatment options that can alleviate their troubling symptoms.

**That was one of the best things in the veterinary field–seeing how something YOU did provided direct benefit to the patient.  That would be good.

4. What are some challenges of vestibular practice?
Insurance reimbursement is always a challenge with vestibular practice. We depend on insurance reimbursement for most of our diagnostic work. As reimbursement is cut, we have to be creative in how we stay a viable business.
**This is a hard one.  How do you get past this stuff?  I would want to worry that I’d be out of a job at any given moment.

5.  There are a lot of conditions and presentations that you see in this line of work (more than in a hearing-specific practice), so exposure is very important.  Do not listen to nay-sayers. I was told over and over again that an audiologist can not build a successful practice and/or career out of diagnostic work. I did not believe this for a second, so I was not held back. I have been able to commit myself to an area of audiology that I love, and I have experienced great professional success doing so (without selling one hearing aid over the past 5 years).

ear art 3

I really liked this series of articles!  It gives me more information so I can really know HOW to choose an area based on my personality, interests, and skills.  Instead of just falling into whatever is convenient.

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Disgruntled Professors

2 Oct

Are the worst!

I honestly don’t know what is the matter with my entire department at Riverpoint.  I have no idea if these professors have a lot more responsibility and running around to do or if they are just turkeys.  This is the third University I Walking about-July 2012 034have attended, and I have never before encountered such belligerence to downright open hostility at meeting students.  As I’ve said before, I find it particularly strange behavior for a department whose emphasis is centered around. . .  Communication.

University of Nevada, Reno was the largest state school in a very population-sparse state whose focus was not really higher education.  So they were a smaller school–and those professors, wrote office hours on their syllabus, would make a meeting outside of the hours, and seemed to genuinely want to help students.  Especially those that took extra time to meet with them.  I never encountered as much as annoyance when trying to set up a time to talk to anyone.

The Quad 2University of Missouri-Columbia is a Big-12 college, probably the largest in the state, with more funds, and better facilities.  So a pretty big University–in a college town.  I think it was mandated that every professor had to specify office hours for each class they taught and make themselves available at those times.  Because those professors would try to entice students to come in and see them during office hours.  My chem professor was always posting on his Facebook page that he was having his office hours at the student coffee shop and stuff so please drop by.  Those professors were excited when you did come to office hours.

At Riverpoint, many of the professors won’t even put specific office hours on their syllabus.  They say, “by appointment” probably as a way not to be tied down and as discouragement for students to come see them.  Today’s professor had written hours on her syllabus, but after class when I confirmed those hours with her, she acted all sketchy like she didn’t know office hours existed.  Then, finally she said there was a sign-up on her door.  So I said, “Oh I didn’t realize your office hours were by sign-up appointment–do you already have someone for today?”  She was all covert again, and said she didn’t know, I would have to walk all the way across campus and check her door. . .  So I did.  And there were appointment slots, but most of them were for the preceding week, and the one future date was already taken.  Since I was unable to sign up, and I was already all the way over there, I sat outside her office and waited for her.  When she approached, I didn’t press for an immediate meeting, but did say there was no place to sign up so I wanted to schedule something.

My professor seemed really put-out and said we could meet now–even though it was 2:30 and she hadn’t eaten lunch yet, was really looking forward to her lunch, and by the way she was very hungry.  I told her I didn’t mind if she ate while I asked her some questions (she needed to microwave though) and I totally understood, as I attend her class AS my lunch break on Monday.  So I also miss eating half the time because of her attending her class during my lunch break from work.  She just looked annoyed and like I was a huge inconvenience to her, and this was a waste of her time.

I got out our last exam (which we did not go over at all in class) and told her I really wanted to make sure I understood everything for the future, because I want to be an audiologist.  She seemed unmoved, so I nervously rushed into my few questions.  I had, I think, 4 things I wanted further explanation on.  I did not, at any time, ask for or dispute any missed points.  Though I would have liked some for the 2 answers I do think I got right, I didn’t even broach the subject of points/grades.

So the whole thing made me feel awkward and horrible, as if I was totally a disruption to my professor’s time, and unwelcome and what a waste my questions were.  Which, as a person genuinely wanting to learn and eager to do well, (not to mention paying big money for) I would hope professors would appreciate.  But she did not.  And when I got to my last question, she was sort of short-tempered and rude.  Maybe her patience wore out at that point.  Maybe she was starving.  Maybe she didn’t have an answer so she fronted with anger instead.  Who knows.  At that point, things went (further) downhill in a hurry.  She had asked for the opposite anatomical term for “central.”  I put distal, which I thought was opposite.  Because proximal means point of origin or center and distal is the opposite of that.  So in my mind when two words are synonymous, they both have the same antonym.  She just got really crabby with me and kept saying, “I don’t understand why you just didn’t put peripheral.”  To which I was like–why doesn’t distal still work–it’s the same as peripheral and still opposite of central/proximal???  I would really like to know why that won’t work.  Like an explanation–not just “why didn’t you put the answer I say is correct?”  Anyway, she referenced the textbook and even though I think my answer is still correct (and I read and outlined the textbook) I just didn’t want to further poke the bear so to speak.

feed the bear

I said, “Thanks for your time, enjoy your lunch.”  And she was all, “I will!” as if I kept her from it for hours and hours and it was all my fault she wasn’t eating until after 2:30 PM.  So per the usual at this University, I left with adrenaline pounding, red in the face, and feeling awkward and embarrassed by the horrid way these authority figures treat me.  I seem to have a special talent for unintentionally making people belligerent.  I don’t TRY to make people pissed, but it happens a lot to me.  Anyway, I didn’t feel this behavior toward me was warranted or appropriate.  I was there during her effing office hours!  Making me feel bad about having questions is not right, and it shouldn’t happen.  I would complain–but this whole branch campus is that way so I don’t think it would do any good.  Riverpoint strikes–still. . .  Repeatedly.

 

Operation: Advertise

4 Aug

yard sale 1So today was the big day of the yard sale.  Which wasn’t optimal for 2 reasons:  People want to yard sale on Saturday–in the morning to be exact.  And it was 88F outside.  So we sweated it out.  And only 6 people came to the sale.  This includes 2 family members, and 2 neighbors.  Also, one car left without buying a single thing.

I’m motivated to make money for my good cause too.  The more we get they more we can give them.  The charity I anatomy guychose is stellar too:

HLAA provides assistance and resources for people with hearing loss and their families to learn how to adjust to living with hearing loss. HLAA is working to eradicate the stigma associated with hearing loss and raise public awareness about the need for prevention, treatment, and regular hearing screenings throughout life.

http://www.hearingloss.org/content/who-we-are

Summer Begins 2013 021I think we have some quality items, and we are pretty much accepting any amount of money offered.  Because the alternative is to have to haul the clothes to the dony bin and GIVE them away.  Deal around with the low-balling of the pawn shops.  And take a bunch of stuff to the trash.  So it would be a LOT easier if people would come take it.

Plus, it’s a lot of work.  We made the signs.  Then, drove around displaying them.  We organized the items into like-groups, and priced things.  We carried a billion boxes and tarps and bags all over town and across the yard.  Then, we tried to display everything.  And then the waiting (out in the sun and heat) takes forever too.  And the clean-up.  Well, by the time you’re ready to quit, you just want to quit.  Not haul everything back into the garage and cars, pick up signs, and clean up the yard.

yard sale 2

So we are going again this Saturday.  After I get out of work.  So I will put the word out much better this time–annoying or not.  Come on down, and tell your friends!

 

And Some Good

12 Apr

After such a bad, ugly, and annoying start to the day, I wanted to write a quick update to the afternoon.

It went well-I LOVE school!

My semster long, huge project was due today.  It was this resource notebook which included handouts for the significant others of patients with speech sound problems.  As sort of interactive homework ideas.  Another part was the articulation tool summaries.  And we had to include typed pages outlining every step of the comprehensive intervention hierarchy for both children and adults.  We had to summarize, outline, type, and include examples of three different types of therapy approaches, and we had to write details of a diverse lingusitic population, dialect, or bilingual population (mine was Appalachian and Ozark English) with descriptions of their speech characteristics, ways to approach intervention, and a works cited page.

Anyway, I probably didn’t have to go into that much detail just now–but since I typed it, just go with it.  The point is–I worked really, really hard on mine.  My instructor told me I was a very conscientious student!  And when I saw what the rest of the class turned in I suspect my resource notebook is one of the best!  Hopefully, the content is worthy of an A+

Now, I just have one more BIG project and a TBA comprehensive final.  So I’m still stressed, but everything is coming to an end.  And Right now I have a 95.6% in the class–which is JUST an A+.  Now, to keep it.

And I just talked to my (nice) adviser, and she said I was a highly motivated student and had excellent work ethic.  She was trying to convince me to go for the SLP masters at Riverpoint, and said I’m officially part of “the cohort” and I’ll be all set up for the grad program.  She was telling me I could use my medical background to work with some sort of barium-swallowing-radiology kinds of studies, or work with adults with motor impairment, or go in a number of different directions.  Then, I could go for the AuD.  There’s no reason I can’t do both.  Or apply to both simultaneously and see which pans out.  I also turned in all my overabundance of financial aid paperwork to my adviser today, which also took a lot of running about, copying, and headache, but THAT’S finished too.  And I’m about to sign up for fall classes.

Everything school-related is good 😀