Tag Archives: University of Missouri

Saint George Vet: Public Health

30 Jun

Public Health Essays:

If you have experience in the area you wish to study, describe that experience.

I volunteered once a week in the organic chemistry stock room when I was a freshman at the University of Nevada, Reno. I measured, prepared, and mixed solutions for student labs, transferred chemicals into bottles under the hood, checked lab materials out to students, re-stocked chemicals after labs, and washed dishes. I was trained to handle hazardous chemicals, spills, and waste in the laboratory environment, as well as the importance of lab procedure.

Chem lab-not mineMy semester volunteering in a laboratory setting gave me an advantage in my chemistry classes and gave me the motivation and confidence to pursue a minor in chemistry. Taking an additional chemistry lecture and four-hour laboratory to obtain that chemistry minor gave me the analytical skills and laboratory techniques necessary to excel in any research situation.

I have worked in animal laboratory settings as well. Besides my research jobs at University of Missouri, I was able to accompany Dr. Sharp on his rounds at Charles River Laboratories. He checked the stools of Cynomolgus macaques, Cynomolgus rhesus, and marmosets, looked for lesions and possible research-ending health problems, and prescribed medication. I was able to remove sutures from one of the primates and feed crackers to the monkeys in the group pens.

My background in chemistry and my extensive animal experience will enable me to pursue veterinary jobs in public health. Earning a concurrent degree would help me build knowledge and confidence in areas such as monitoring the production of vaccinations and antibiotics as they are researched, developed, and tested for use in both animals and people.

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Interview Prep: MU Vet

26 Jun

1. What does a vet do?

Veterinarians are responsible for maintaining the health and welfare of animals, preventing disease, and educating people about animal care.
There are various jobs in the veterinary field, including military positions, conservation, development of drugs and vaccines, teaching, food safety and public health, sports medicine, as well as zoo and aquatic veterinarians.
Veterinarians can also continue their education and specialize in a variety of fields such as lab animal medicine, internal surgery, or behavior.

2. What is the best thing about being a vet?

I like the combination of skills veterinarians use on a daily basis. The challenge of being mentally capable, physically fit, and compassionate is one I am confident I will excel at.

3. What is the worst thing about being a vet?

I’m glad there is an option of euthanasia in veterinary medicine. That said, my least favorite aspect of the job is seeing an animal with a treatable ailment get euthanized because the owner does not want to spend money. I understand euthanasia is part of the job and know that veterinarians cannot save them all, but it is unfortunate when an owner refuses to do what is best for their pet.

4. Why do you want to be a veterinarian?

I have always loved animals, and starting in 5th grade I observed, volunteered, and worked in veterinary settings. All the experience made me even more passionate about becoming a veterinarian. I am excited to own my own veterinary hospital in a rural area where I can combine the organization and meticulousness of Dayton Valley Veterinary Hospital and the availability and willingness to see a variety of species that is characteristic of Noah’s Ark Animal Hospital.

5. What type of veterinary medicine do you want to work in?

I definitely want to practice medicine in a rural area. Most of my experience is with small animals, so at this point I would be most comfortable working in small animal private practice with an emphasis on exotics. Though working with horses, and getting some exposure to larger animals, made me open to working in a mixed practice.

6. What is your favorite leadership?

I have participated in many leadership opportunities including being captain of my cheerleading team for 3 years, helping diverse children in an alcohol and drug free safe space, working with senior citizens in National Honor Society, and participating in a session at Cedar Creek Therapeutic Riding Center with disabled people.
My favorite leadership was when I held offices in the pre-vet club. I was in the club every year of college, and acted as social chair for 2 years and vice president this last year. It’s my favorite leadership, because many people were wary of the club and could not see the benefits of being involved. I think, just like anything else in life, you get out of it what you put into it. I tried my best to help turn the club around, and therefore had a great experience.

7. What has your greatest achievement been?

I’m proud of all of the volunteer hours I have accrued, both in the veterinary setting and around my community. I made a concerted effort to gain experience in veterinary hospitals and succeeded in accumulating 728 hours following veterinarians one on one. I have also spent quite a bit of time helping children, the disabled, and senior citizens in both Nevada and Missouri. In high school, I was awarded with 8 scholarships, many recognizing my volunteer efforts.

8. What is your greatest strength?

My enthusiasm is my greatest strength. I have wanted to be a veterinarian since I was little, and took steps to achieve that goal starting at a young age. I was so excited to get into the career that I volunteered over 600 hours at small animal hospitals. I have also worked at small animal hospitals continuously since 2001. My entheusiasm was not limited to small animals. I jumped at every opportunity to gain experience with other species. I helped Dr. Minor vaccinate wolves and went with our relief veterinarian to Sierra Biomedical to see what lab animal veterinarians do on a daily basis. I went with the Chapmans to see a swine facility and helped them vaccinate the staff’s horses. Other staff at Noah’s Ark worked with animals, so I volunteered to help vaccinate, deworm, and castrate sheep as well as volunteered with large exotics at Animal Sanctuary. I got experience with horses working at Equine Medical Services and observed large animal medicine at Comstock Large Animal Hospital. Currently, I am working with pigs, rats, and frogs on environmental physiology aspects of several studies at the animal science research center.

9. What has been the greatest lesson from your volunteer experience/job?

Through my varied experiences in the veterinary field, I have learned that working long hours 7 days a week is normal. I have regularly worked on holidays at all my jobs and understand I will not make as much as a dentist. I have realistic expectations about my future as a veterinarian and am excited to work hard for as long as I am able.

10. What is your biggest weakness?

I am not independently wealthy. To compensate, I got scholarships, worked one or more jobs, and secured loans to pay for my living expenses and education.

11. What are your plans if you do not get in this year?

I will apply to Ross because my first career choice is still veterinary medicine. While I’m waiting to hear from them, I will pursue a masters degree.

12. What is a failure or disappointment and how did you deal with it?

The fact that I did not get accepted to veterinary school my first two tries is disappointing. Instead of getting discouraged and bitter, I took the advice of the veterinary school and tried to increase my undergraduate GPA and course load this last semester. I went to Nevada to take advantage of a scholarship I still have. The situation in NV was far from ideal: I lived in my boss’ yard with no heat or water, and had to drive 400 miles a week to attend class and observe at a large animal hospital. I made it through the less than optimal situation and still want to be a veterinarian more than ever!

13. Why are you the best candidate?

I moved to Missouri to gain residency because I heard that the veterinary school had a good reputation and offered a superior education. I obviously want to be a veterinarian, because I have been involved in the field since I was in 5th grade and this is the 3rd time I have applied to school. I will not change my mind about my career aspirations or flake out and transfer to a different school or drop out altogether—I’m in this for the long haul. I want to further the profession of veterinary medicine by offering my clients affordable prices, an elevated standard of medicine, and extended hours of availability. I plan to practice in a rural town as long as I am able to work.

15. Do you have anything to add to your application?

I’ve been very busy this semester. I resumed my position at Noah’s Ark and I’m helping with environmental physiology at the animal science research center. I am helping collect and input heat stress data on pigs. I also work with rodents to see how diet affects temperature regulation. I’m also taking a class on veterinary terminology with Dr. Chastain.

14. Any final questions or comments?

Throw in question answers if they weren’t asked.

Interview: MU Vet Med

4 Jun

Z-O-U

Interview
What does a vet do?
Vets work long hours to educate owners, treat animals, perform surgery, engage in research, and promote the veterinary field.
What is best about being a vet?
I enjoy the combination of skills that a veterinarian is required to use on a daily basis. A vet has to be mentally capable, physically fit, dexterous with her hands, compassionate, and be prepared for anything.
What is worst about being a vet?
My least favorite aspect of the job is seeing pet owners who are not willing to do anything for their animal. It’s difficult to see an animal with a treatable ailment get euthanized because the owner does not want to spend money. I understand euthanasia is part of the job and know that veterinarians cannot save them all, but it is unfortunate when an owner refuses to do what is best for their pet.
Why do you want to be a veterinarian?
I have always loved animals and I started to look into the career of vet medicine at an early age. I researched the career and volunteered, and was still not deturred, so I knew veterinary medicine was for me. I like seeing the bond between people and their pets, I think it is exciting how every day is different, and I am anxious to own my own business.
What type of veterinary medicine do you want to work in?
I would like to own a small animal practice with an emphasis on exotics. Dr. Minor jokes that she wants me to sign a letter of intent that I will work for her in my hometown of Dayton, NV.
What is your favorite leadership?
I really enjoy being an active member of the pre-vet club. I have really given my all to the club. I think you get out of it what you put into it–just like anything else. I liked planning the social activities and putting together 2 scrapbooks as the social chair, and I really enjoy organizing the officer meetings and ordering and selling the apparel as vice president. Though, staying positive when members get disgruntled can be difficult, I like trying to make the club fun for everyone.
What has been your greatest achievement thus far?
I am proud of all my volunteer hours. I made a concerted effort to not only clean kennels and stalls in a hospital environment, but to follow a veterinarian as much as possible. I succeeded in being one on one with a vet for 653 hours. In high school, I was rewarded with 8 scholarships, many rewarding me for my volunteer efforts.
What is your greatest strength?
You know, that since this is the 2nd time I have applied to vet school that I am very diligent. If something need to be done I will work at it until it is finished correctly.
What has been the greatest lesson from volunteer/job so far?
I understand that being a veterinarian takes a lot of time. I have worked 12 hour days, without lunch breaks, and I have seen my employers work 7 days a week for months at a time. I realize that veterinarians have to work long, hard hours from the time they graduate until retirement with very little time for recreation. I also know that it is one of the most rewarding jobs a person can have. I am excited to feel the sense of accomplishment of successfully treating a difficult case, and long to know the pride of having a good business because I have practiced meticulous and skillful medicine.
What is your biggest weakness?
I get impatient when I realize not every is going to work as hard as I do. I hate to see other students out drinking before big exams, workers lazing around instead of being productive, and people that do not give their full effort to a project.
What are your plans if you do not get in this year?
I will graduate with my animal science degree and chemistry minor in may, then work to get more animal experience. I plan to take anatomy from the vet school, then re-apply, branching out to vet schools at a national and world level.
What is a failure or disappointment and how did you deal with it?
Last year I did not get into vet school. Instead of getting discouraged and thinking my dreams of being a veterinarian were crushed, I made an effort to improve my application. I worked on my grades, got more animal experience, and worked on my interview skills. This year, I am supremely confident that I will get in!

BAD Blogger!

7 May

I just moved.  Moving is crazy.  This is my excuse for such a long post-drought.  This is my timeline for past moves so I can tell the stories of this last month:

14

And it’s not like I haven’t done it (moved) before, on the contrary I have moved so much it portrays a wanderlust or flakiness that doesn’t really fit my true personality.

Polson- enteranceWhen I was 4, my parents and I moved away from all of our extended family in Montana, to Nevada for job opportunities.  Montana is beautiful, but you “can’t eat the scenery.”

I grew up in small-town Nevada, going to the same Kidron's NV pics 050school for 13 years.  Which is good and bad.  I have well-established roots, and I always knew everyone and all my teachers, and everything.  BUT everyone always knows you and your business too, so good luck trying to live down embarrassing moments, changing/growing, or keeping anything on the D.L.

RenoI went to the same college everyone goes to my first year, which required a short move to Reno (an hour away) but tried to branch out instead of staying with my same ‘ol click as most of my small-town counterparts did.

I wanted more opportunities and was chasing my veterinary dreams so I took a HUGE leap and transferred to mid-Missouri, site-unseen, my sophomore year.  That move was big-time, but I was still somewhat protected by the insular world of college:Mizzou quad  I moved right into dorms and worked for campus dining services.  When housing, jobs, and school all line up–moves are substantially less stress.  And emotionally, I had already been away from loved ones before (moving from MT at 4) so I wasn’t lost or lonely.  Plus, school and work kept me so busy, who had time to miss anything?!  The move from Nevada to Missouri required a 30 hour drive.  I made that drive with my mom carrying a few dorm essentials.  I made that 30 hour drive with Douche, in a U-Haul.  I’ve made that 30 hour round trip by myself and a car-load of essentials and a dog.  I made the return trip by myself and 2 cats.  I HATE that drive.

265173_2208001644072_1368379309_32588356_2533618_nThen, my Saint George acceptance pulled me out of Missouri–which I really liked the 6 years I was there.  I had to make that 30 hour drive once more, with my dad, in a U-Haul.  Never again!  I’m not sure anything else aside from vet school would have compelled me to ever leave the midwest.  But veterinary school was calling, so I temporarily visited my parents and dropped off my cats that summer.  Nevada was just a brief visit.

Except Saint George fell through a week before matriculation.  Suddenly, I had nowhere to go, but obviously I wasn’t going to live with my parents–that was never the plan.  I had to choose where to go–and not being based on any acceptance, it could be anywhere that had a vet school.  I didn’t really know, and my parents dictated that I decide immediately.

I had been watching a lot of Frasier, wanted to try out a more liberal and city environment, and Frasier saturation increasedliked Washington’s veterinary program.  So to Seattle I (blindly) went.  Driving a car-load of essentials the 15 hours by myself.  I lived with my great aunt, which I always saw as a temporary transitional set-up while I looked for my own place.  I had previously gotten along famously with my college roommate, so I wasn’t discouraged Seattle housing prices negated living alone like I had in Missouri.

bedroom darkI moved to 12th Avenue, and soon saw what real-life roommates mean.  I needed out of that place ASAP because it was ridiculous!  Around this same time, I met Cool.  We hit it off, and sometimes I stayed at her shared housing situation, which was WORSE then my 12th Ave scene.  I don’t think I ever completed a full sleep cycle in Seattle.  I was always tired, always grumpy.  It made me HATE the city.  I needed my own space, without crazy roommate scenarios.  I needed a reasonable housing cost.

So we moved 6 hours across Washington to Spokane (with cats in Cool’s car and me driving a U-Haul).  And it was so much better!Fremont Fest 114  We could afford our own apartment without roommates!  Vet school didn’t happen for me, and the job market in Eastern Washington is horrible.  There was nothing there for us–Spokane wasn’t home.  We needed out, but Western Washington is out of our price range.

So I wanted to show you, I’ve moved.  I have left those emotional connections and everyone I know.  I’ve moved out of state.  I’ve had to find housing from a distance.  I’ve known the expenses.  Which brings us to 2015 and my latest move.

Veterinary Medicine is for Spoiled Rich Girls

23 Jul

I understand this title might be unpopular.  And maybe a little strongly worded.  But even the dissenters have to acknowledge there has been a shift in the career’s image and it’s central figure–the veterinarian.  OR, you may disagree and chalk this post up to bitterness.  Which, OK maybe.  BUT despite any residual bitterness at being thrown out of my career dream before I was even allowed to really get started.  And P.S. this is based on MY observations in Missouri a.k.a. ONE state, ONE university, ONE veterinary hospital (the only one I worked at with other college students) of many.  Some facts:

The days of the 40-ish+ male anti-social with people, practical with animals farm/ranch background dude are over.  Now, mooveterinary medicine is dominated by young females with mid-size town backgrounds, a cheery people-loving social attitude, and combined brains/compassion/MONEY.  This shift has come with the popularity of pets.  Where veterinary medicine in the days of James Harriot was agriculturally based and more about business then companionship.

-Veterinary admissions perpetuates the need for $$$$$$.  A parent or backer of some kind would give a huge advantage.  The 20-somethings I worked with and the 30-somethings I encountered during my years of work really presented this.  These college kids went to school full-time (tuition fully paid by Mommy and Daddy) and worked very limited hours (for drinking money).  The parents had bought and paid for the cars, paid their housing expenses, and some even helped out with living expenses.  In short, all these students had to do was get their 4.0 and show up to their weekend shift at work.  The entering vets came in with the intention of working PART-time schedules, and each one started their families in less then 2 years employ.  Also, they acted like princesses complaining if they got shorted on their lunch time or had to work a weekend.

-Look at just the fees TO apply to vet school.  First is undergrad tuition.  Vet schools look down at community colleges, because they think the classes are easier.  So in order not to look lazy, you have to go to a (more expensive) 4 year university.  Then, you have to pay $200 and up for standardized tests.  That is not including expensive study books, tutors, or classes on HOW to excel on the standardized tests.  Some kids pay for someone to help them write their essays, or for someone to edit the essay.  Then, every vet school requires an application fee of $40 and up.  And all schools charge a transcript fee.  It all adds up quickly.

-After the straight-forward fees are more costly obligations.  In order to succeed, a veterinary candidate has to be well-big head horserounded.  As a pre-vet student and veterinary-hopeful, I heard “well rounded” over and over.  They want leadership, volunteerism, evidence of team-work, experience. . .  That experience also needs to be in a variety of fields.  It’s not good enough to have thousands of hours in small animal private practice settings.  The committee wants to make sure you also have large animal experience, research, exotic, and equine.  Proof of all this well-rounded business is on the application.  There is unlimited space for activities  in all the above-mentioned categories and more.

–>What are the financial implications of well-rounded?  Well, tell me how to be a full time student (earning the necessary 4.0 GPA, no less) getting the well-rounded ducks in a row, AND working enough hours to pay tuition, housing, car, and living expenses?  I suppose it can be done, but it’s not super-practical.

-Participation in sports and clubs requires money.  Money for dues, uniforms, club-dues, travel, on and on.

-Vet schools give MOST points to observation hours, then to volunteerism, rewarding employment with the least points.  This is because they figure an observer is actually standing next to the vet engaging in active learning, while the other positions are starting to do the obligatory cleaning tasks of the vet hospital, so they are actually learning LESS about the career.  So not only do you have to get well-rounded experiences in multiple areas–you have to do it without pay.

-All this well-rounded stuff means dedicating TIME to said activities.  And that’s time away from earning money and time away from studying.  Which of course the committee REQUIRES a super-high G.P.A. so they don’t get sued for accepting a subjectively good candidate over a quantitatively proven one.

-So being well rounded costs money and takes away ability to earn an income.  I never did figure out how to earn enough Green Bluff 019income to pay my tuition and rent and other expenses, while pursuing as much diverse experience as possible, and still have enough time left over to study for As in my difficult classes.  Not having to work because you had some sort of financial help would have given me an advantage.

-Another side effect of garnering a well-rounded background?  The applicant is unable to stick with anything for very long.  If veterinary admissions rewards people with the most diverse experiences, which dictates that these people can never establish a long relationship with any one sport/club/hospital.  And I saw it over and over at Noah’s Ark.  In their senior year of college, these kids would sign up for a gazillion clubs and put the minimal effort into those.  Just so they could write it on the application.  The flakiest students that came in to the vet hospital for only a few hours a week over one year did the best with their vet school applications.  People like me, that were dedicated to one or two clubs and worked hard at one place, missed those crucial diverse experiences points.  Is that the sort of vet you want?  Flaky and half-assing thing just to write it down?

-Then, IF the applicant is actually admitted into a veterinary program, tuition is impossibly high.  And school keeps vet students so busy that they could not possibly hold a job.  Not for more than maybe 2 months of the year anyway.  Probably not at all.  And definitely not enough to pay rent, food, or other expenses.  You would NEED someone to help with expenses, or at the VERY least co-sign for a big loan.

-Then, the career outlook is bleak because so many veterinarians are graduating.  So if a job is found at all, it certainly doesn’t PAY enough to pay off the inevitable school loans.  Maybe it’s a good thing I couldn’t afford to go to SGU. Just look at this blog post:

http://sharonostermann.blog.com/2011/10/14/student-debt-in-u-s-now-exceeds-all-credit-card-debt-in-u-s/

-70% of my veterinary income?! How terrible to fulfill my dream of becoming a vet only to have to be on food stamps. . .  Highest debt:income ratio.  So there you see how a poor or even regular person would have a VERY difficult time getting in and getting through vet school and then practicing vet medicine.  And why–it’s the spoiled, idealistic, rich girls completing the program these days.

Scary Carl + Grades

15 Jun

We huddled together in my dark closet, apprehensive to make noise, and worried he would return and do something worse. My roommate dialed 9-1-1 on her cellular phone and told the operator in a wavering tone of voice that our landlord had assailed us by kicking in the front door during a fit of rage. The operator got the address to our secluded my missouribasement apartment and assured us she would send help.

This was just the latest in a series of escalating acts of harassment since 2004 had begun. Preceding this, I heard a sound in the living room and walked out of the bedroom to see my erratic landlord had used his keys to let himself inside without prior notice, or even a knock. I still have no idea what he was planning to do that day, and I began to use my chain lock regularly because I did not want to find out.

A few long moments after our frantic emergency call, the police arrived. They were so Sarah, me, Eileen 2005astounded by the profound damage to the door and the frame that they took pictures. Though the landlord owned the property he had destroyed, he severed the chain lock, which had violated our reasonable expectation of privacy. While the police were collecting the evidence and writing their reports, the landlord came back to the house to “fix the door.” The police arrested him, but a few hours after his release from jail that same day, our implacable landlord antagonized us by shouting through the living room window. It was at that point my roommate went to stay with her boyfriend.

I had nowhere else to go with more than a month left on my lease, and fall finals were commencing in one week. I was fretful the arrest had inflamed our fractious landlord even more and he would come in while I was showering or sleeping and do terrible things. I locked the screen door and the front door; not that it mattered, as he had keys to both. Then I took further precaution by barricading myself inside using the futon. After one sleepless night, I went to get a restraining order against my landlord. I was granted an ex parte that kept him from setting foot on the property but still, I was overwrought. I figured a piece of paper would do little to stop my volatile landlord from terrorizing me.

MizzouThis atmosphere of paranoia and chaos was not conducive to studying. At the time, aside from being enervated from fear, I did not realize I had any recourse. I assumed since the University of Missouri was closing for winter break, there was no possibility of taking my finals later. I felt I had no choice but to muddle through my exams and hope for the best. In my restive state, I bombed every test I attempted, probably dropping my grade about a full letter in each class.

If something extraordinarily aberrant like that happened these days I would inform my professors in The Quad 2an attempt to get accommodation on my final exams. Alerting the university of my predicament would be my next step, as I vowed never again to be reticent with my school when I am in crises. I regret that my grades suffered during that trying time, but this disturbing incident taught me the life lesson of not taking my safety for granted and how to utilize the police, the courts, and the university system in place to help people with such dilemmas. In combination with my more formal lessons imparted from academia, this upsetting episode helped shape me into the strong, resilient person that I am today.

Experience Summary: MU Vet [circa 2006?]

13 Jun

I volunteered 633 hours at Dayton Valley Veterinary Hospital. I was able to observe exams, diagnostics, and surgeries. When I was hired, my duties included: cleaning kennels, walking dogs, and maintaining the premises. I was able to observe exams, diagnostics, and surgeries during my time at Dayton Valley Veterinary Hospital.

We do not have certain duties at Noah’s Ark Animal Hospital. Everyone does everything. I do kennel work, diagnostics, reception, and anything else that needs done. I have been lucky enough to gain experience with small exotics and observe surgeries at my job.

thanksgiving milkingI helped care for dairy cattle being used in heat stress research. We milked the cows at 4 am and 4pm every day, which entailed sanitizing the milking equipment, milking, and re-sanitizing the milking equipment. I also helped feed, clean stalls, and bed the cows. I observed a biopsy while I was working with the project.

Dr. Greg and Terry Chapman took me to a hog farm to see the facility and observe the commonpig farm management practices. I was able to see the different stages of production as well as learn about waste management. I also went to Fisher Brother’s Hog Farm and toured the facility and observed the daily routine.

I worked as barn crew at Equine Medical Services, Inc. My main responsibilities were cleaning stalls, bedding, feeding, watering, and medicating the horses. I helped unload and load hoses in the trailers, caught horses for their pregnancy checks, and walked horses to paddocks. I also cleaned the six barns and maintained the facilities.

I spent six hours one Saturday helping Dr. Terry Chapman examine horses. We vaccinated the horses for West Nile Virus, Eastern & Western Equine Encephalitis, and Influenza (tuberculosis). The Coggins test requires that about 3 mL of blood is taken to analyze for Equine Infectious Anemia. I was able to actually pull the blood and vaccinate most of the horses we worked with that day.

At Noah’s Ark, we often get exotic small animals. I have force fed a chinchilla, trimmed bird nails and wings, restrained small and large birds, force fed ferrets, gave a turtle a baytril injection, and force fed a snake a pinky.

I volunteer at D-D Animal Sanctuary, where I help clean out tiger and panther enclosures. I have also bottle-fed a claf and fed an alligator among other odd-jobs. I have seen many different exotic species there and enjoy the experience I gain in a wildlife rehabilitation facility.

I was able to follow Dr. Sharp on his rounds at Charles River Laboratories, a research facility. He checked the feces of Cynomologus macaqus, Recess, and Marmosets to check for gastrointestinal problems. He changed food and prescribed medication as necessary. He also looked for gross lesions and possible research-ending health problems by the groups. I was able to remove sutures from a monkey and feed the monkeys graham crackers.

I also counted the 65 hours from my heat stress research listed in food animal.

I observed Dr. Minor working with wolves. I went to a private compound where wolves were used as security and helped her vaccinate many wolves. When one of the female wolves was very sick, she came to the veterinary hospital for two weeks. We gave the wolf supportive care and eventually euthanized her.

I worked on a dairy cattle heat stress research project. Rectal, tail-head, shoulder, and hip temperatures as well as the respiration rate of 18 cows had to be taken four times a day. Meticulous records on the cows had to be kept. The temperatures and respiration rates were recorded as well as the feed intake and output of each cow. I drew blood from under a cow’s tail.

I volunteered in the Organic Chemistry Stockroom mixing solutions, pouring chemicals into smaller containers, putting chemicals back on the shelves after labs, washng dishes, and checking lab materials out to students.