Tag Archives: education

Reflection: Worst Moments of 2020 (11th to 1st worst)

31 Dec

honorable mention-updated driver’s license.  In AZ, you don’t have to renew for like 25 years.  But my parents said soon, everybody had to transition to a special kind of license.  And if you didn’t you couldn’t fly.  So we went to do it one weekend, and online it made it sound so fast.  And all the info seemed like you just walk up and get it and leave.  But when we got there it was a DMV situation with lots of people and hours and hours of boring waiting.  And the germs!  I was freaking out (this was even before Covid-19 was known at all) b/c I HATE getting sick.  We got the license, and we managed not to get sick.  But what a let down.

10-Sneakers were banned from work except on Friday.  I wrote a well-thought, sincere letter trying to persuade leadership to reconsider and allow fashion sneaks.  This was the first time I had EVER spoken out at this job.  I barely talked for the first year I worked there, due to McKesson PTSD.  And I finally found an issue important to me, and carefully, and thoughtfully tried to address it.  They just reiterated policy and acted very corporate, not human, about it.  What a waste.  The whole thing just made me feel like a number or something.  Then, I had to jump through a bunch of hoops to get an ADA pass to wear sneakers to work.  It is very heavy-handed.

9-Pride month got hijacked by BLM.  And I had been really looking forward to it, but there was no to-do at all for it.  Obviously, nothing physical was going on, but I didn’t even get to post, like 1 rainbow anywhere.  And “hijacking #BLM” was pretty much shamed and stigmatized on social media.  I wasn’t allowed to even talk about it. P.S. Pride is necessary. Trans people suicide and violence by others is sky-high. Bisexuals are erased. Gender nonconforming need logistical concerns met by society. Conversion therapy is still practiced. Closeted teens still self-harm, and out-teens go homeless. It isn’t frivolous to celebrate Pride!

8-Arguing with Covidiots on Twitter.  At first, I assumed people didn’t know.  And I watch news twice a day and listen to podcasts daily, so I was getting information quickly.  I tried to educate, and that was a losing battle.  I would refute their nonsense and write facts, but people would argue, tweet by tweet for like, days, at a time.  I soon realized it wasn’t legitimate lack of knowledge on their part but selfishness, political-brainwashing, and willful ignorance.  Now, I do not engage with any individual, b/c it would make me rageful and insane.  I’ll just put a fact-based tweet in general, or navigate away entirely.

7-I had the high of knowing my dink-Supervisor transferred departments.  I had been keeping a log of all his infractions, and had been talking to his boss about it, who (mostly seemed annoyed I was saying anything, and making her work) assured me he was on a mediation plan.  So it was really a happy moment to find he wasn’t going to be in my life any more.  And I wondered what new blood would be in charge of my team.  I hoped I could start out on the right foot with them.  And I hoped they would care a lot more, and be a go-getter, and really make a positive change!  Oh the possibilities!  But my supervisor was replaced with this other guy I had previously worked with, who can be arrogant/condescending/sexist/dinky.  I had been hoping for just someone new and better–so it was a big disappointment that one dink, was replaced with the ONLY other person at the job I didn’t like.

6-My (now) former supervisor wanted me to go to advanced training.  When I asked if it was in the work building and was concerned about going back physically because of Covid-19, he yanked me out of training.  I had to go to H.R. about it because the training was never even planned to be in the building, it was over Zoom, and you can’t yank someone’s promotional opportunity because you’re a Covidiot that doesn’t believe in science.  But it felt bad to have to fight for public health, fight to keep my promotional opportunity. So after a year, I had finally spoken. I asked about the shoes. But then, my supervisor kept doing shitty things, and after I had documented like 30 terrible things, I felt like I had to say something. But now this very important thing came up– and now I’m considered a squeaky wheel. Which is not accurate.

5-Difficulty, time, and struggle to get things delivered from about March to late August?  Toilet paper, Clorox-Wipes, Lysol, and a lot of the food we usually keep on hand were out.  And I was having to repeatedly check Costco, Walmart, Amazon, the Dollar Store, etc… just to get basics.  When the pandemic first started, NONE of those companies were prepared, and everything was a hassle to impossible.  I had a toilet paper A (ration), B(napkins), (Magazine pages), D (leaves) emergency plan.  It’s funny, byt also not an exaggeration, and that made me anxious!

4-Password issue the first couple days of work from home.  I was locked out of my work account for 2 full work days.  And had to call IT and hold with them forever, be on the line with them for long times, and be so frustrated when their interventions were unsuccessful.  I felt stressed and guilty b/c it was literally the first week we were allowed to work from home, and I didn’t want my job to think I was taking advantage and fucking around.  But I also didn’t want to go into the building and get Covid-19, or get fired about it.  

3-My Prop 208 homework. Arizona has been gyped of education by many crooked CEOs, lobbyists, Koch Brothers, corrupts politicians, and as a result the schools are abysmal. I am big on education, because that really is a thing that pulls people up, and helps poverty, and helps people vote better. These things matter by the time a pandemic strikes. Also, my mom is a teacher, and I just think AZ can do better. So this proposition was supposed to tax wealthy individuals to help schools. But of course all the greedy grifters had a big disinformation campaign to trick Arizonans into voting against their best interests. So for 6 weeks leading up to the election, I took it upon myself to refute the scores of people bending facts, lying, and tricking voters about what the prop is, and who it impacts. And people here hate teachers. They have zero respect for the teaching profession and think the educators are over paid. And they regard school as free daycare, really. And a lot of Arizonans hate paying any taxes at all–even to educate kids. It was exhausting! I probably did 2 hours per day every single day of those 2 weeks, with a surge that last week. It was tiring arguing with liars, and trying to convince argumentative ignorants. The prop did pass-yay! But by the slimmest of margins (sad and maddening). And now those dirty money-hungry people are trying to overturn it in courts. gerr.

2-My mid-level manager routinely doesn’t read or pay attention.  And it’s totally annoying, b/c she’ll ask questions she should know, or could easily look up.  Or she’ll get after me, b/c she didn’t read properly.  We follow workflows, and my end point directed me to send the claim to her.  I sent a bunch of info including many numbers and 2 screenshots to this manager.  She didn’t understand it somehow–which is really stupid.  My (new) supervisor wrote to me telling me to make sure to include more info with my “questions” (but this was not a question, it was an endpoint on my workflow).  I asked what else I needed to send (b/c it was more than enough!) and he replied, “more.”  We went back and forth b/c there WAS NOTHING ELSE TO INCLUDE, it was ridiculous.  Honestly, I suspected he hadn’t read my initial e-mail either, he had glanced, seen the manager’s question, and lectured me without looking.  And I felt like instead of admitting I HAD sent more than enough–everything he listed, he doubled-down and gave a generic “more.”  I kept asking, “what else do you need?” Same answers.  Then he said to call him and he would explain it.  But I was like, “I keep a record, can’t you just type out a list of items I need to include in all emails?”  But he was still all, “I can only explain it on the phone.”  Which I also thought was a croc, but I didn’t want to get in trouble for insubordination, so I reluctantly called.  And he literally said exactly what he said before!  He had my email up on a shared screen, and I heatedly asked what other info they needed.  I even told him I suspected the manager wasn’t opening claims, reading notes/remarks, or paying attention to workflows. And he defended that! He said management is very busy, couldn’t I just send more? He said, “more” again when I asked what, specifically–and I LOST MY TEMPER.  The whole exchange was a fucking ridiculous charade.  I sent enough info, but the manager either didn’t look at stuff or was being dumb, and this Supervisor didn’t read the fucking initial e-mail and just assumed I hadn’t sent everything.  And his tone on this unnecessary phone call was jovial, and he was like, “Is that cool?”  And I said something to the effect of, “No it is NOT cool, but you are my supervisor, so yes, sir, whatever you want.”  It was a completely inappropriate way to speak to an authority.  Not what I’m going for at work.  But he was being such a (misogynistic) douche!  An attitude of like, ‘this dumb bitch is so stupid, I’m going to put her in her place because she’s just a silly woman who doesn’t understand things.’ After the call, I sent him 3 egregious examples of the manager not reading or looking or paying attention. I had saved them, b/c this was becoming a chronic issue. And he defended her! Which is crazy. So whatever the fuck…

1-Goose got very sick with the herp.  He’s already under-weight, and we’re always trying to get him to eat more.  We give him appetite stimulant, but he still doesn’t get enough.  When he got herpes in that already weakened state, it hit him so hard.  And he was completely stuffed up to the point he had to open mouth gasp like a blowfish.  So it was extremely concerning.  He didn’t move, didn’t eat, and felt terrible.  Even though we’re home for work, ordering all groceries delivery, and not going anywhere–I took Goose to the vet.  They didn’t offer that much.  Their big plan was to send a can of food.  But I remembered how the feline exclusive treated cats and requested those items.  He did recover, but I was terrified this was the end.

A Low Maintenance Post

1 Oct

I usually abbreviate maint, because I never end up spelling it correctly.  I guess I got lucky this time.  Here’s just a spur-of-the-moment, since I’ve been a terrible blogger as of late.  I have a lot of drafts, but they all require work, and IF I finish studying/papers/work/sleep I rarely have enough brainpower left.  Maybe until the end of the semester, I’ll just write new ones and leave it alone until I have more time/energy/brain cells to spare.

Some goings on:

-I got a request to tutor again.  Which is OK, but I hadn’t done the paperwork, b/c I didn’t know if I’d have business, so in order to get paid I had to jump through some hoops this week.  But now I’m all set up.  The tutoring didn’t go that well (I thought).  But I had a request to do it weekly (I declined b/c I think it would compromise my own studies), so my tuteee must have decided it was worthwhile.  I am helping, but less often.  The 1 thing I can say is organization, study habits, and just the will to buckle down and learn are very important.  That and help me help you.  Listen, heed. . .  it’s probably something we all do, but I’m going to remember it next time I need help–receive the help.

-I got that swim cap back.  100%, returned inside out (the messed up side), and no feedback.  So I hate that and now I feel I wasted all that time, effort, and stress.

Goose helping with swim cap

-Our fridge “rains” inside–I have no idea why.  But something molded in there last week, and now this rain-water is mold-infused.  It’s disgusting and gets into any other food–especially breads or sauces.  I had to take the time to empty everything out, scrub it down, and add baking soda yesterday.  And today, my fruit tasted of. . .  Mold–ugh!

-I decided neuro is the problem with my schedule.  It makes Friday really suck, and I noticed that a lot when class was canceled last Friday.  Just 10 Fridays left!

-I was going to try to finagle some financial aid next semester.  If I stay in school, I get a large loan disbursement and my undergrad loans remain on forbearance (the ones that are, at least).  I was going to apply for graduation in the Spring to remain technically a student.  I thought of Auditing enough courses to get loans (so I didn’t have to worry about my GPA), or do my independent study.  The loans are wise to all of those tactics, and unless you are at least a part-time student WORKING FOR A DEGREE no loans, no ifs ands or buts.  So I guess I’m done, done in December.  I’ll take on extra hours of work, and I guess be finished transcribing.

-It was 54 degrees F at 11AM today.  It’s officially fall, as per the usual I feel WA cheated me out of summer.  It starts 7/5 and goes to September-ish, back-and fourth between 80 and 60 as most places do in fall.  But even the “summer” days are gray and cloudy.  Though the torrential rains are a myth.  If it rains at all, it’s brief and a sprinkle usually.  It’s just cloudy.  Often.  I can’t wait to move.  Cool is sad to leave the gray.

-I got an offer to house-sit, which had I been on my own, I would have immediately agreed to.  It’s over Christmas, but I hate all hyped things, and Christmas is one of the most hyped things of all.  So it’s not in my top five favorite holidays.  So I don’t care about pet-sitting during it.  And I’m not in school at that time.  Plus, having a larger kitchen to cook in, satellite TV, and beautiful views wouldn’t be the worst thing.  But Cool is resolute–she wants to spend Christmas Eve evening and night at our apartment, and Christmas morning here too.  For what, I don’t know, but no amount of prodding would change her mind.  She has decided somewhere along the line Christmas is her favorite holiday–I really have no idea why the change.  So I’m pretty sure saying no a 2nd time in a row will cut me out of the running to pet-sit.  I’ll miss it, because it was really good, easy money 😦

house-sitting 005

I guess that’s all for now–I need to rewrite my phonetic transcription tip-sheet so I can read it.

Interactive Audiology Presentation

2 Jul

I had another presentation today.  This one was for one group of high school students, and one group of (cue scary music:  dun, dun dun) middle school kids.  It was also shorter–like half the time we got last week.  And I knew I could do a YouTube video, but I think that’s kind of a cop-out, especially with younger students.

I knew I wanted to get the students out of their seats, but didn’t really know how to teach ear anatomy, noise-induced hearing loss, or assisted listening devices like that.  I thought about pictionary, but that’s really for review material–not novel teaching.  I asked my mom and she said she only knew of active stuff for review and quizzing.  When I pressed her, she said she could do like 8 activities for math, but not anatomy.  Still, I asked her to give me a sample.  The very first thing she talked about was using manipulatives.  And my advisor had talked about how they had used a funnel to show the function of the pinna before with great success.  That got me thinking. . .

 

general ear anatomy

My Mom (maybe both of us?) came up with putting “pieces of the ear” in a paper bag and having them kids pluck them out–you know for the gross-out factor of reaching into a bag not knowing what you’re going to get.  Then I came up with all the little objects I could use to show each portion of the ear:

funnel for the pinna/outer ear

drum for the tympanic membrane/ear drum

a hammer for the malleus often called the “hammer”

I used a door stop and taped the anvil coffee logo on both sides for the “anvil”/incus

I had a tiny shoe keychain for the stapes/”stirrup” to show the footplate’s action

I put a brush in a ziplock and filled it with water to have a visual for the fluid-filled cochlea containing hair cells

and finally, a sponge was the brain

education at family weekend health fair

I had the kids pick the items and stand in the front of the room with them, in the proper order.  I moved my arms (next time, I’ll have all the students at the desks wave their arms to involve everyone) to simulate the physical sound waves, then, I went through the function of each part of the anatomy:

My ear canal/funnel person stood there capturing the sound

The drum bagged to show sound hitting & vibrating it

Setting my 3 ossicles (w/interlinked arms) in motion (next time have them hum like a kazoo to show the ossicles vibrating).

My stapes person kicked the oval window on the bag

The inner ear person created gentle waves to stimulate the hair cells to send the sound info to the brain

And my brain/sponge was dipped in the water of the bag/cochlea to show the sound reaching its destination.

loudness vs intensity

Then, we did the whole thing again, but I jumped up and down exaggerated to show LOUD sound.  Everyone exaggerated their motions, the stapes footplate stomping the oval window to create a tsunami and flatten the hair cells.  And that time the sponge (a 2nd sponge) remained dry and unhearing.  It got everybody involved, laughing, and hopefully remembering the hearing process a little better.  And I have to say I was on my A-Game, and really extroverted (not my normal way) and funny and in charge of the scene.

That allowed me to segway to the FM loop where the kids played Simon Says, one in the hallway and one in front of the group doing silly things.

fm trainer

I had a lot of fun, and felt “in the zone” rather then shy and nervous, so it was great.  I could see myself doing little activities to promote prevention as an educational audiologist in my future.  It’s not the same as having to discipline a whole class for an entire day, which is what I didn’t think I’d like about that option.  Now, if I can only track down one of the many videos of the thing so I can put it in my portfolio!

Camp Na Ha Shnee (and my presentation)

28 Jun

I cut & pasted various different articles to give you a good idea of what the camp is about.  Even though it didn’t fall on an ideal day (my Dad’s 70th birthday when they were actually visiting) I rearranged things, because this population is close to my heart, and the mission of the camp important.  Three of us presented for Speech & Hearing Sciences.  We wanted to introduce some aspects of the career (SLP’s have a very diverse scope of practice with a lot of subsets) AND simultaneously give the teens good health info for themselves.  So we focused of voice (anti smoking, tobacco,  & drinking), ears (noise-induced hearing loss, ipods in particular), and the brain (TBI = don’t drink & drive, wear helmets).  I think it went really well, and most of the students were engaged and excited.  Here’s that camp info I told you about:

snake dance 3

The result of an earlier student leadership exercise to give the summer institute a native American-sounding name, Na-ha-shnee is an amalgamation of the words Native American High School Summer Nursing Institute. It has no literal translation in any tribal language. Na-ha-shnee encourages Native American youth to explore and pursue a career in the health sciences while providing learning experiences with native health care providers as teachers and role models.Indian 1

Fewer than 20 Native Americans across the United States have earned a PhD in nursing. One of them, Robbie Paul, Native American Health Sciences director at Washington State University (WSU) Spokane, is dedicated to increasing the number of Native Americans practicing health sciences in the Northwest.  Native Americans represent less than .5% of the health care workforce, and the Na-ha-shnee Native American Health Science Institute is taking steps to engage and expose Native American students to careers in nursing, medicine, exercise physiology, pharmacy, speech and hearing, and more.

The camp is part of a larger effort to solve the shortage of health care professionals in the Native American community, said Robbie Paul, director of the school’s Native American Health Sciences program and founder of the camp.  Paul, a beadworkNez Perce member who has a doctorate in Leadership Studies from Gonzaga, said the camp aims to build confidence in students who might deal with teachers who have low expectations of them.

For more than 17 years, Native American high school students representing various tribes from the Northwest have been given the chance to participate in Na-ha-shnee. Participants in the Na-ha-shnee Heath Sciences Institute represent the Spokane, Colville, Yakama, Snoqualmie, Puyallup, Lummi, Umatilla, Blackfoot-Cherokee, Shoshone-Paiute, Cherokee, Turtle Mountain Chippewa, Shoshone-Bannock, Tlingit, Chippewa Cree and Siletz tribes. They come from Washington and Oregon.  The program encourages youth to try out a career in the health sciences by providing hands-on learning experiences with Native American health care providers and health science and nursing students.Montana-Nikon 247

When the camp first began in 1995, its sole focus was on nursing. However, once students began expressing interest in learning about other career areas available in heath care, the camp expanded to respond to these interests. Now, Na-ha-shnee includes workshops on nursing, medicine, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, exercise physiology, speech and hearing, and brings Native American health care providers in to be teachers and role models for the students.  The camp has grown from six to 12 days and added math, English and leadership training. Students also practice writing tiny tots 5scholarship essays and interviewing with admissions counselors.

Na-ha-shnee is open to high school students who will be entering the 10th, 11th, and 12th grades in fall. The application process includes a written essay on why they want to come to camp and also explaining their interest in health care. Applicants must also have a minimum 2.5 GPA, have at least taken Algebra I, and have at least a C in their math and science classes.  Traditionally offered exclusively to Native dancer 4American high school students, the program was expanded last year to include students from disadvantaged backgrounds. The Na-ha-shnee program partnered with Creating a Nursing Path, a program consisting of 27 high school students. Funded by a workforce diversity grant, Creating a Nursing Path is led by Janet Katz, PhD, RN, associate professor from WSU College of Nursing in Spokane. The purpose of this program is to address the need to graduate baccalaureate-prepared nurses from disadvantaged backgrounds

In its 19th year, the camp has participants from 13 tribes, some from as far away as Arizona’s Navajo Nation. Attendance has grown through recruitment visits to tribal and urban schools, word-of-mouth and the Internet, Paul said.  Of the more than 340 campers over the years, Paul estimates about 70 percent of them have gone on IMG_3847to college.

Paul presented the purpose of the camp as threefold: academic, leadership and cultural. For the latter, Paul uses stories to teach the students life lessons embedded in their tribal heritage.  Paul said that the experience is both an academic and social one for those in attendance. In addition to taking English, science, and leadership classes, students get to experience different aspects of college life such as living on campus, dorm life, and having a roommate.

OK, Go!

28 May

I’ve been dallying, because I am intimidated by the personal statement.  But I need to just get something down, and stop all the internet scouring, as it’s just taking time.  I’m not sure it’s all that helpful.  So in the interest of making $hit happen, here goes try #1:

UNC AuD app checklist

Format:

intro–talk about shopping w/dad and how that inspires my interest in the career

–in 1st paragraph tie in my internal personality traits that work well with audiology

Body–very briefly mention pre-vet, but generate substantial list of vet traits that relate directly to audiology

3rd paragraph/conclusion(?)–further show it’s AuD I want (not vet) by talking about hearing screenings, classes, media that inspires/educates me and how it directly relates to the specific type & population I want to work with.

Audiogram-Familiar-Sounds

OK, quick and dirty for content purposes–can be fleshed out and corrected later.  The 1st Draft isn’t SUPPOSED to be perfect (that was a note to myself)!

Intro:

As a child it was always special bonding time for my father and I to go grocery shopping.  It was a time-consuming affair, but we liked to be together.  The shopping itself, was tedious and boring, but I love my dad and liked to laugh with him.  One damper on the process was checking out.  My dad could not hear his total.  It made me feel awkward and I did not like how people in line behind us became impatient.  Those people should see my dad as I did–funny, compassionate, warm, loyal, hard-working.  Instead they saw him as an impediment to leaving the store–a burden, an annoyance.  I hated to see the cashier become flustered or impatient.  Why couldn’t everyone realize my dad had the hearing loss because he is a hero?  He got this embarrassing condition fighting for our country in Vietnam.  But I felt ashamed, because I also felt annoyed and embarrassed when the check out process was slowed by my father’s disability.

It made me ashamed, because I consider myself a compassionate person.  That is the whole reason I leaned toward being a veterinarian for so long–I wanted to help the helpless.

Today, I am inspired to help people like my dad function like the heros they are.  I want to not only help hearing aids be available to patients, but make the human side, the rehabilitation, instruction for use, and communication skills to be available.

[note to self:  stop trying to make it sound perfect and be perfectly organized, and just think basic content–you can fix this stuff later, you’re getting stuck!]

Traits that I embody are organizational skills, dedication, and determination.  They are perfect for the field of audiology.  Organization is necessary to assess the patient and figure out appropriate diagnostic procedures by looking at every aspect of the problem, the case history, and the anatomy.  Dedication comes in handy when you commit to a patient’s progress and quality of life over time.  Audiologists are not finished after the diagnostic and fitting portions.  They have to follow through and make certain that the person they are working with are functional, confident, and meeting their own goals.  Determination is a skill an audiologist needs to work with a variety of people, with differing needs.  Audiologists have to tailor care to the deficits of each person, and determination to seek the correct diagnosis, find outside the box solutions and, persist in trying until it’s right is pertinent.

Because I have those traits, feeling embarrassed to be seen with my struggling father made me ashamed.  I could have such compassion, and I was letting my own emotions get in the way of that when it came to one of the most important people in my life.  It was my compassion that had led me into being a pre-vet student.  And though that career did not work out for me, the skills I gained while chasing is translate directly and nicely to audiology.

Nonverbal communication skills, essential for ascertaining animal temperaments with the twin goals in mine of keeping human and animal uninjured, and efficiently accomplishing the task at hand is directly related to audiology.  When hearing loss makes verbal communication difficult, reading postural, ocular, and other signs becomes helpful.

The detail-oriented nature that veterinary practice demands, is also necessary for audiology.  Looking at the entire patient, running the best diagnostic tests, following through with best amplification, and making sure the patient is receiving benefit from your work, is a lot of small details.  It requires meticulousness and thoroughness.

[generate a bigger list of traits used for both vet & AuD]

The desire to work in audiology was sparked by my intent to help people like my dad.  The necessary skills were honed in a different health field.  Once I got my foot in the door to the speech and hearing sciences, the knowledge of the profession followed.  Learning about anatomy and physiology gave me a good foundation for normal.  The speech and hearing sciences tied the chemistry and physics I had already taken together with the auditory and communication systems.  Learning about pathologies and amplification was interesting.  I really enjoyed the rehabilitation tactics and audiometric evaluations.  And I was able to practice them through performing hearing screenings through my school.  I liked putting the theories I had learned in the classroom to practical use on real people.

These specific examples of things we did, showed me I would like to work with the spectrum of ages in this specific field of audiology.  And of course, remembering my dad, I will emphasize aural rehabilitation and follow up with each of my future patients.

health fair 2014

All right, that wasn’t so bad.  I’ll publish this then generate some lists to make it better!

Enhanced by Zemanta

Why Class Group-Work Does Not Teach Teamwork

25 May

Here’s another old draft I stumbled upon.  I do dislike teamwork when my grade is on the line.  I want to earn my OWN grades.  It shouldn’t be influenced by the work ethic of other people.  And it should be left to chance–what group members you get.  Also, I shouldn’t have to do every aspect of a big project in order to get a good grade out of it.

I HATE group work!

jumbo turtleNo one ever asks me to join their group, so it’s always awkward to get into a group in the first place.  I only want to do my own work (which is of outstanding caliber *truth, not bragging*) not be humiliated when no one wants to include me in their team.  Then, IF I do find a group everyone in the group knows each other and wanted to work together except me, so that’s more awkwardness.

And, in class–who do you sit by?  Friends.  People sit by friends, or they end up getting to be friends because of location.  People that sit in front are older students or sight-impaired, or very studious, generally.  While those in the back are too cool for school and want to text and chatter during class.  So you get partnered up with like people anyway.

An example of a group project gone awry–not my fault:

MY group sat in a row.  The fifth girl in the row, was the writer, I was the first on the opposite side of the row.  And the Green Bluff 2 025three gals in between talked about their “juicing” diets.  The writer organized our paper by name (douchi) instead of just writing a half page and putting everyone’s name at the top.  Though I had written an answer for EVERY theory (when we were only supposed to address one) this writer wrote a literal sentience for my name.  She wrote a paragraph under each of her friends though they had contributed ZERO because of the juice diet discussion.  And under her own name, the writer wrote a half page.  Bitch.  So it was made to look like I was a slacker.

My worst group project ever–also not my fault:

My Farm Plan

pretty in pinkMy senior year at Mizzou everyone had to take a capstone course in their major.  Hog Production is what fit into my schedule–though I didn’t intend on working with hogs and had no strong interest in them.  Anyway, our semester project was to write this big, involved farm plan and present it.  All in a group of 4.  The big thing was that the plan had to utilize everything we learned in class AND be consistent   Meaning all 4 group members had to have the same set-up.  Before Thanksgiving break I e-mailed my group and told them I would be happy to edit their portions, as well as type them all in one document–as a pre-vet student I needed an A in every class, and this project was the biggest component of our grade.

None of my three group members had STARTED the semester-long farm plan at that point in late November!!!!  By turkeyNovember–with only a month left of class.  Hadn’t.  Even.  Started.  Now, what am I supposed to do about that?  So I wrote the prof. explaining the situation and asking what I should do.  He just assured me in all his years of doing this project the groups have always come together by the end.

So no help.

And sure enough, come grading time my (assigned) group members with senioritis and plans to work for their family farms in a week or so (ie not pre-vet and not concerned about one course grade) had not completed the farm plans, and the ones that had slapped it together.  So even though MY portion was worthy of an A (the prof even said that), as a group we got a C-!  When I complained to the prof I should not be graded based on other people’s caliber of work–he just said he had always graded them as groups for the 20-some years he had been doing this, and he had never before seen a group that didn’t come together as mine hadn’t. . .  I got a C in that class 😦  NOT fair.

So that’s a huge reason why I’m anti-group work.  And here’s a bad dream I had related to group work:

To dream that you are in a bus accident suggests that it is time for you to move away from a group setting and venture out on your own. You need to be more independent.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Goose Song

8 May

Cool and I are always talking to, and especially singing to our cats.  I’ve told you about our language of dropped liquids (/l/ & /r//) and how sometimes our MeowEEZE sneaks out of our apartment into our conversations with real people.  And how we don’t really care about being crazy cat ladys.  There are worse things.

Sloppy's electric throw 1

Sloppy-Joe Cool’s song (she had many, but her name-sake song) was to the tune of Beethoven’s 5th:

Sloppy Joe Cool

Sloppy Joe Cool

Sloppy Joe Cool Sloppy Joe Cool Sloppy Joe Cool

Kitty!

 

Choco-Luv’s song also features her name prominently:

Choco-Luv Choco-Luv Choco-Luv Choco-Luv

Choco-Luv Choco-Luv Choco-Luvups

Hay Hay Hay!

 

But I think Goose’s song is a real master-piece.  We are constantly calling this kitty different names, depending on what he’s doing at the time–he’s often doing funny or ornery things so in accordance his song goes:

Goose 2012He’s a goose

He’s a man

He’s a coon

He’s a Cat

He’s a turkey, he’s a lion, he’s a mongoose

He’s a big cat

He’s a fat cat

but he’s a real good buddy

+/- (‘cept when he’s not)

 

I just wanted to share how fun our lives are because of our beloved pets.  In other news, I got my Audiometry final exam grade back today.  I got 98%!!!!!!!!  So my final course grade is a 97.4% A+.  I am so proud of that because I really buckled down and worked so hard for it.  Throughout the semester, but BIG-time at the end.  I’m especially happy about it because I was afraid after losing so many points on exam 3, intimidated by the test format/grading/demeanor of the instructor, and worried about losing my overall grade and all-important GPA.  And despite the pressure, I stepped up and pulled it out.

I want to make clear that the course content was not as conceptually challenging as many classes, though there was a lot of things to cover.  Classes that have been more difficult:  Math of any type, physics, biochem, chem lab, chemistry, nutrition, animal physiology, anatomy, genetics, and speech & hearing sciences to name the most notorious in my memory.  All the same, because of the instructor, it’s been one of my most hard-fought A’s I’ve ever ever gotten (behind Physics 2 b/c math used to be my nemesis and Biochem b/c it was conceptually challenging, had TONS of material, and involved a lot of rote memorization of vocab/cycles/structures).

Even though I don’t have (much of) a job, I think I’m going to treat myself with a new pair of boots.  Boots because they go on clearance in the spring when stores are trying to clear the large inventory and they are something I can use this winter and especially in Colorado.  Now, it’s time to celebrate!

Enhanced by Zemanta

pet-peeve college loan advice

19 Apr

is ALWAYS geared to. . . Parents. It highly annoys me.  Who are these kids with rich Mommies and Daddies paying their Tiger Walkwhole tuition bills (and whatever else)?  That’s not MY life.  And I don’t have the rich husband paying my way either.  Address tuition information/tips to students.  I think it’s ridiculous to assume students aren’t paying their own educational expenses. Maybe that’s why it’s so much more expensive then I can afford?

I’m thinking about this because April is supposed to be money-blog-month.  But also because I had to jump through a moneybunch of hoops to complete my FAFSA supplemental paperwork.  Which is admittedly better since I turned 25 and don’t have to hassle my parents for their (*required*) personal financial info that only ends up hurting my chances for the loans.  Which isn’t fair or right at all since they don’t pay my tuition/rent/car/bills, so I shouldn’t have to use their tax info.  But it’s still a pain, and I think they purposely hire the most inept people possible to work college financial aid.  I had to re-submit 2 packets of paperwork because they obviously didn’t OPEN it, to see the necessary documents were all there.

And I was also thinking about college tuition because another one of my undergrad loans is coming off of forbearance–which super-sucks.  And I’ve been procrastinating BIG-time about calling and seeing if there’s some option.  ANY option black_dragonfishto put it back on forbearance or reduce payments at the very least.  I’m putting it off for many reasons:  I hate the phone.  Really.  I hardly use mine at all, and literally only use it for emergencies, and when I have to make these types of outgoing calls.  I’m also putting off the call because of long holds, having to repeat info over and over, the horrible tone of the operators (they act annoyed you’re bothering them and treat you like a loser), and the thought that nothing can be done anyway.  I’ll make the call, but maybe Tuesday. . .

Here’s an interesting article about college costs, which is bleak, but I think true to life:

This is interesting. A credit hour in 1979 at MSU was 24.50, adjusted for inflation that is 79.23 in today dollars. One credit hour today costs 428.75.

found that the average student in 1979 could work 182 hours (a part-time summer job) to pay for a year’s tuition. In 2013, it took 991 hours (a full-time job for half the year) to accomplish the same.

Is it any surprise that so many students today are suckered into taking out non-dischargeable loans, in growing chunks, to pay for their bachelor’s degrees? More than two-thirds of recent graduates are carrying debt—and some of them will be paying it off for decades to come. Studying computer science at Harvey Mudd may be worth it; majoring in art at Murray State probably isn’t.

http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2014/04/the-myth-of-working-your-way-through-college/359735/

Speaking of pet-peeves, WordPress changed the settings so when you publish something that had been in your drafts–it is put on the date that you FIRST made it a draft, not the day you actually hit “publish.”  It’s no good, because that effectively buries new posts, put it on an old calender month instead of showing a current post, and seems sneaky.  So now I have to cut & paste all my draft posts into a new folder in order for it to go on the top of my list for the current day?!

Enhanced by Zemanta

My First Hearing Screening

3 Apr

The first I’ve administered I mean–I have probably taken part in school and stuff.  Though it must not have made much of an impact, because I don’t remember it at all.

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERASo I forgot about that elementary school slowing down traffic so much around 3PM! I got MAJOR lateness phobia because I didn’t get to my parking lot until 3:20!!!

 

And I’m so glad I chose the shorter slacks after all, because it was really wet & mucky and I would have had to dry clean the gray ones. But both my group members were in black slacks and black suit jackets! Damn them. But I was comfortable anyway.

And we got a senior grading us–luckily. I was so glad it wasn’t the professor! And she was really nice and was MORE confused then we were, and just let us sort of pick what we wanted to do! So that was good.

We did the child first and Jen picked to place headphones and gives directions to her own daughter so I got the easiest part–setting up and placing the chair. And when I placed the chair I sat down in it with the headphones to make sure they could raise their arm without getting tangled. So I raised my arms a couple of times, and I guess I did it in a funny way because everyone laughed. So that was cool and it broke the tension. We all got 100% on the first part.

Then we had the adult screen–and the other Jen chose to do all the questions and instructions on her own husband–so that was cool. But I couldn’t do the set-up again since I’d already done it, so I got to place the headphones and actually run the screening. So I put the headphones on properly.

I made sure my audiometer was set to all the right numbers and everything and pressed the signal so he could hear it. . . Maico MA-25 audmAnd he did NOT raise his hand! So it was already an instant-referral. I was like oh no! Because you have to finish that test, reinstruct, re-do the headphones, and it could be a total refer that finds hearing loss. Also–I was like–what if the headphones or machine are somehow WRONG???!

My hands started shaking and I was freaking out inside. Also, I was really sweating profusly because of the lateness-phobia nerves, into the being graded adrenaline, into the WHAT’S GOING ON-panic mode I was in.  So I did the 2nd tone–and NO response. No!!!!!!!! I did the 3rd and he finally raised his hand. So I thought–good at east we know things are set up ok. I switched ears and got confused. He responded and didn’t respond on THAT side too. And I was freaking out so much that I wasn’t writing the responses down immediately, so I couldn’t exactly remember which ones he responded to and didn’t–so at the end I just quickly jotted down R NR NR. But either that was how he had responded or our senior hadn’t been paying attention either, becuase she didn’t mark me off on that.

So then I had to take the headphones off and re-instruct–which I’m sure he was like–what is going on? I got it! Then I had to RE-DO the whole sequence. And luckily he responded to all 6 tones that time. I was so relieved!

And when it was all over my group and the senior was like–good job! You did so good with that! I don’t know why he didn’t hear those! So we talked and laughed and everyone was happy. And we got 100% on that too.

And we got to leave. As I was walking out I looked at my watch–only 10 minutes had passed! It went so fast!!! And I started to look if there was any observations starting at 4PM. You have to look on all our professor’s doors. I looked at the first door, and none started til next week. The second door didn’t have a sheet. Then, I got close to the 3rd door–and noticed the BITCH was right inside–and I didn’t wanna sign up with her, or hang around the hallway any longer because I would eventually have to address her–so I just hustled out of there.

greekAnd I went Hamilton so I could stop by safeway and get some B&J, but when I finally, slowly got up there–Safeway was packed so I was like eff that. So I guess I’ll have to have some fruit dip–and cry.

So that was the whole thing! Oh and in more bad news, the senior warned us we have to do this again, but with the threshold, which is more in depth. And last year they did it individually with our professor grading–so hopefully that’s not the case this year

Enhanced by Zemanta

Different Areas of AuD

30 Mar

I need to make an informed decision about what type of audiology I might like to do.  When I was trying to gain admission into vet school, I always put small animal private practice (like the other 90% of applicants) because that was what I knew, what was easiest to get involved with, and that’s where most of my experience was at.  I want to actively choose my arena for Audiology.  So I went to the student academy of audiology website and here is what I found:

http://www.audiology.org/SAA/SAA_News/SAA_interviews/Pages/default.aspx

–>everything without ** in front of it is cut & pasted directly from the interview.  **are my thoughts and comments.

Beltone audm

AuD/PhD:
**absolutely not! That sounds like either double the years in school or double the credit-load. Financially, that would be awful to pay for that much more school. Personally, I want to start working much sooner!

Walking about-July 2012 034

Intraoperative Monitoring AuD:
–>there is only one non-medical profession permitted to provide monitoring independent of medical oversight? That profession is Audiology

-2. What is a typical day like?
No such thing really exists in the OR, and for me that is one of the attractions of intraoperative monitoring. Many surgical cases begin before the sun comes up and may last into the night
**I think I would like a more regular schedule then veterinary medicine allowed. I want a cemented schedule of appointments, and regular work hours.

3. you have to be able to think on your feet to overcome electrical fields generated by drills, suction devices, beds and operating microscopes in order to have a signal that is stable and useful in helping to guide the surgical procedure.
**I’m tired of being stressed to the max, and this scenario sounds panic-inducing.

Educational Audiology:

Her first opportunity to provide audiology services was with the Albuquerque Area Indian Health Board, providing itinerant audiology services to seven different Native American communities in New Mexico, Utah, and Southern Colorado for 13 years. She then went on to develop an educational audiology program for the Rio Rancho Public Schools in New Mexico and has provided educational audiology services for 20 years to students and staff.

**I think this sort of thing would be awesome in the short term!  I would love to help my people.  But I would want more stability eventually. . .

inner ear 2

2. What is a typical day like for you as an educational audiologist?
Every day is different, but I spend some time doing just some basic hearing screenings, repairing hearing aids, working with teachers to help them understand hearing loss, and working with FM systems. So usually about half of my day is out at one of the schools and then I usually return to my office to contact parents, write reports, and do more complete hearing evaluations. I have portable equipment that I take with me to provide some itinerant services out in the schools and then I have a sound booth and clinical equipment at my office to provide more complete evaluations. I don’t do any hearing aid fittings, but hearing aid checks and minor hearing aid repairs are a daily routine. I fit personal FM systems and provide monthly checks. Our district has purchased a number of classroom amplification systems for each school; three of our newer schools have classroom amplification systems in every classroom. So I do spend some time troubleshooting classroom sound systems and doing some teacher training with them as well.

**all of this sounds cool.  I wonder if I would miss actually fitting hearing aids, or if I wouldn’t love the fitting process in the first place.

3.  I am fortunate to have the opportunity to follow the students throughout their school careers. Some of my students I’ve seen since preschool and have graduated or are getting ready to graduate from high school and go on, so you get the opportunity to see how the students mature and hopefully become contributing adults. I have even tested the child of the first cochlear implant student I worked with.

**this would be amazing!  Unless you had to work with some sort of turkey, then you had to be with that person forever. ..

my_dbay_room

4. What are some of the limitations and challenges in the field of educational audiology?
I think one of the most important things that we need to do is the communication and collaboration with the teachers and speech pathologists, and yet this probably one of the most difficult things to coordinate because of the teachers’ schedules. Teachers are being required to do more and more with less and less. I think that collaboration is probably one of the most important things that we can do to support our deaf and hard-of-hearing students, not only with teachers but also with ancillary staff. Finding that time to collaborate continues to be a challenge. And I think sometimes just for people to understand the impact of hearing loss on a student’s ability to access instruction is a challenge.

**I totally concur.  Talking to my Mom, she is excited to make changes or learn about audiology and hearing, but just didn’t know the info.  I think I might have an advantage in this because my Mom is a teacher so I can see both sides of the story and fill in holes.

5.  to get involved:  Educational Audiology Association-EAA is probably the best value. It provides such relevant resources through the listserv. EAA also provides summer conferences that provide not only continuing education but also the opportunity to network with other educational audiologists and to belong to a community of people who have similar experiences and common goals of helping deaf and hard-of-hearing students become successful.

real estate agent

Industry Audiologist:

1.  I am currently employed as a product manager at Phonak U.S. and what that means is that I work with traditional hearing aids (BTEs, RICs, ITEs) throughout their life cycle. I work with our Swiss colleagues and our research and development team to get the right materials and to develop the right products for the market. Then once it’s brought to market I work with our sales and development team in the U.S. to train them on what the product does so they can in turn train the hearing healthcare professionals. I also discontinue the products when that time comes later down the road. –

**In my mind, I thought this would be more testing industrial workers for noise-induced hearing loss–something I’d be interested in.  I see now this is a fancy term for “drug-rep” aka sales.  Hell no!

2.  I thought, “You know, maybe I should join a profession that actually talks to people as opposed to talking petri dishes.” sales representative

**I’m the opposite.

3.  working with the veterans was amazing as well.

**Though, I think I would like this aspect.  But you could find it in other AuD niches as well.

4.  My typical day is crazy! I don’t really feel that any audiologist has a typical day. It’s always something different, which makes the field so exciting. Right now my day revolves around a lot of meetings with different departments from research and development, to science and technology, to marketing, to market insights looking at what are the market needs of the hearing impaired and how can we use our products to best serve those. I do a lot of work with the development and marketing of training material. How do we leverage the material we have and what’s the best kind of representation of material, be it print or digital, that we can give to health care professional so they can in turn help their patients the best way they know how.

**no, this isn’t for me.  I wouldn’t like all the travel or commissions, and I couldn’t be super-phony to sell-sell-sell!

5.  6. What are some challenges of working for a manufacturer?
Two things come to mind: One is travel. Sometimes the travel is amazing, like Switzerland, sometimes it’s not. For a lot of audiology positions within the industry, it does require an extensive amount of travel. You have to be flexible in your lifestyle, and really want to do that. The day to day travel can wear on you, so you have to be prepared for that. From the health prospective, to the family prospective, you have to make sure that fits within your life and the lifestyle you want to have. The travel does afford you the opportunity to travel and meet people all over the world and to see how audiology is done all over the place. The other challenge is that I don’t get as much patient care as I would like sometimes. I got into audiology to help people. As a clinical audiologist you get to do that every day in the clinic. Sometimes as you’re away from that you want to reconnect to that every once in a while. Luckily, opportunities within manufacturing allow for that but it’s not every day. Sometimes you’ll see a patient every once in a while, either working with a validation group, or working on a research team, or also going to help a clinical audiologist in the field. Sometimes you crave that patient interaction, which is why we all got in this to begin with.
**Just like I thought.

dino CI

Cochlear Implant AuD:

I think what really drew me to cochlear implants was the science-base and how frequently the technology changed; it was constantly evolving.  I liked being in on the cutting edge of that and being a part of the research and development and making it possible for deaf individuals, who before had access to amplification, but not with the same success that we are able to provide them with implants, actually be able to achieve near normal speech and language.  So that’s what made me really focus on cochlear implants and make that my primary area.

2.  typical work day?
So on a clinic day, it would vary between going to the operating room and assessing the internal device in the packaging to make sure it’s a functional device, and then again checking the device once it has been implanted, and then assessing the neural responses from that individual using the cochlear implant after the surgery is complete.  Another thing would be a cochlear implant work-up where we would do a full assessment unaided but also with amplification primarily focusing on speech understanding and working toward whether or not that person was a cochlear implant candidate and then discussing with them the devices available and helping them determine what would be the most appropriate implant for them.  I also do cochlear implant activations where implant recipients come in after the surgery and have their devices activated or turned on, so that would be the first time that they would hear or have access to sound.  After that it would typically be mapping, so coming back in for follow-up and testing, either to document their benefit and performance or to adjust and change their maps so that they could have additional benefit from the implant.  On research days, I would also be working with cochlear implants, but it would be testing different protocols for mapping and programming and seeing if we can come up with ways of improving that and making it better for patients.

**I’m not very familiar with what this would actually entail, so I’m not sure if I’d like it.

3. What do you like most about working in CI audiology? 
I think I like the fact that it changes so much.  I like the fact that the technology is always advancing, so you’re constantly learning something new, whether it’s software or equipment or parts and pieces.  I like the fact that it’s not static; it’s something that’s different all the time.  And I really enjoy the fact that you get a long-term relationship with families, so you learn to get along with your patient and kind of establish that rapport and the communication to help them do better with their implant.  It’s a long-term relationship so you really get to watch them progress over time.  I really enjoy having that relationship with the patients.

**I also don’t know how I’d feel about constantly changing technology.  It’s good that improvements are constantly making things better for patients, but how difficult is it to keep up with the new knowledge?  Would you have to go to tons of classes and work with product reps a lot?  Because I don’t think I’d like that very much.

**As for seeing a patient progress over time–that would be very fulfilling and cool.

4. What are some challenges that you face in your practice of cochlear implant audiology?
I think a lot of it would be based on reimbursement from the hospital standpoint as well as from the clinic standpoint.  I think we’re always battling concerns that because of the cost of the device and the reimbursement that we receive, which leaves a big difference between the two, and the shortfall that we receive because of that, that the hospital may at some point limit the number of implants that we can do, and we would never want that to happen because we want to provide this device to as many people as possible and to all people that would be candidates for it.  I think that we are always struggling to have enough time and equipment to be able to see all of the people that are actually candidates.  We have a high patient caseload and we work diligently to see all of them.  I think the numbers are increasing, which is great, but being able to have the number of personnel and the equipment and the resources to provide those services continually is something that we are always looking to improve and make sure that we have.

**It would be difficult to keep up on changing state and federal level insurance intricacies, and I would HATE the business side of this!  I would not want to have an overwhelming caseload, pressure to implant as many people possible, or a struggle to get the funds I’m worth.

4.  there is a lot of job security—so I think you’re making an excellent choice that way—but primarily I think there’s just a lot of job satisfaction.  It’s a very rewarding field.  You’re able to provide so much benefit to a patient.  I think it’s exciting to see that.  It’s exciting to have a long-term relationship with the patients and their families.  I think the field itself is exciting because it’s constantly changing; it’s very dynamic.  You’re stimulated intellectually because it’s always challenging to learn new equipment and software and take on the new knowledge, if it’s out there, and incorporate it into your practice, but it’s also fulfilling because you get to work so closely with patients over a long period of time.

**It sounds good a bad to me, and ultimately I still don’t know enough to make a sound (pun intended) decision about whether or not I’m interested in this avenue.

maculae 1

 Vestibular AuD:

there is a lot of job security—so I think you’re making an excellent choice that way—but primarily I think there’s just a lot of job satisfaction.  It’s a very rewarding field.  You’re able to provide so much benefit to a patient.  I think it’s exciting to see that.  It’s exciting to have a long-term relationship with the patients and their families.  I think the field itself is exciting because it’s constantly changing; it’s very dynamic.  You’re stimulated intellectually because it’s always challenging to learn new equipment and software and take on the new knowledge, if it’s out there, and incorporate it into your practice, but it’s also fulfilling because you get to work so closely with patients over a long period of time.

**I would really like seeing a few patients, but in a very in-depth way.  I think it would allow me to do my best work, without all the scheduling and financial pressures.

3. What do you like most about vestibular practice?
Many patients with vestibular problems can be helped. I enjoy discovering a patient’s underlying condition, giving them a tangible diagnosis, and providing treatment options that can alleviate their troubling symptoms.

**That was one of the best things in the veterinary field–seeing how something YOU did provided direct benefit to the patient.  That would be good.

4. What are some challenges of vestibular practice?
Insurance reimbursement is always a challenge with vestibular practice. We depend on insurance reimbursement for most of our diagnostic work. As reimbursement is cut, we have to be creative in how we stay a viable business.
**This is a hard one.  How do you get past this stuff?  I would want to worry that I’d be out of a job at any given moment.

5.  There are a lot of conditions and presentations that you see in this line of work (more than in a hearing-specific practice), so exposure is very important.  Do not listen to nay-sayers. I was told over and over again that an audiologist can not build a successful practice and/or career out of diagnostic work. I did not believe this for a second, so I was not held back. I have been able to commit myself to an area of audiology that I love, and I have experienced great professional success doing so (without selling one hearing aid over the past 5 years).

ear art 3

I really liked this series of articles!  It gives me more information so I can really know HOW to choose an area based on my personality, interests, and skills.  Instead of just falling into whatever is convenient.

Enhanced by Zemanta