Tag Archives: education

A Low Maintenance Post

1 Oct

I usually abbreviate maint, because I never end up spelling it correctly.  I guess I got lucky this time.  Here’s just a spur-of-the-moment, since I’ve been a terrible blogger as of late.  I have a lot of drafts, but they all require work, and IF I finish studying/papers/work/sleep I rarely have enough brainpower left.  Maybe until the end of the semester, I’ll just write new ones and leave it alone until I have more time/energy/brain cells to spare.

Some goings on:

-I got a request to tutor again.  Which is OK, but I hadn’t done the paperwork, b/c I didn’t know if I’d have business, so in order to get paid I had to jump through some hoops this week.  But now I’m all set up.  The tutoring didn’t go that well (I thought).  But I had a request to do it weekly (I declined b/c I think it would compromise my own studies), so my tuteee must have decided it was worthwhile.  I am helping, but less often.  The 1 thing I can say is organization, study habits, and just the will to buckle down and learn are very important.  That and help me help you.  Listen, heed. . .  it’s probably something we all do, but I’m going to remember it next time I need help–receive the help.

-I got that swim cap back.  100%, returned inside out (the messed up side), and no feedback.  So I hate that and now I feel I wasted all that time, effort, and stress.

Goose helping with swim cap

-Our fridge “rains” inside–I have no idea why.  But something molded in there last week, and now this rain-water is mold-infused.  It’s disgusting and gets into any other food–especially breads or sauces.  I had to take the time to empty everything out, scrub it down, and add baking soda yesterday.  And today, my fruit tasted of. . .  Mold–ugh!

-I decided neuro is the problem with my schedule.  It makes Friday really suck, and I noticed that a lot when class was canceled last Friday.  Just 10 Fridays left!

-I was going to try to finagle some financial aid next semester.  If I stay in school, I get a large loan disbursement and my undergrad loans remain on forbearance (the ones that are, at least).  I was going to apply for graduation in the Spring to remain technically a student.  I thought of Auditing enough courses to get loans (so I didn’t have to worry about my GPA), or do my independent study.  The loans are wise to all of those tactics, and unless you are at least a part-time student WORKING FOR A DEGREE no loans, no ifs ands or buts.  So I guess I’m done, done in December.  I’ll take on extra hours of work, and I guess be finished transcribing.

-It was 54 degrees F at 11AM today.  It’s officially fall, as per the usual I feel WA cheated me out of summer.  It starts 7/5 and goes to September-ish, back-and fourth between 80 and 60 as most places do in fall.  But even the “summer” days are gray and cloudy.  Though the torrential rains are a myth.  If it rains at all, it’s brief and a sprinkle usually.  It’s just cloudy.  Often.  I can’t wait to move.  Cool is sad to leave the gray.

-I got an offer to house-sit, which had I been on my own, I would have immediately agreed to.  It’s over Christmas, but I hate all hyped things, and Christmas is one of the most hyped things of all.  So it’s not in my top five favorite holidays.  So I don’t care about pet-sitting during it.  And I’m not in school at that time.  Plus, having a larger kitchen to cook in, satellite TV, and beautiful views wouldn’t be the worst thing.  But Cool is resolute–she wants to spend Christmas Eve evening and night at our apartment, and Christmas morning here too.  For what, I don’t know, but no amount of prodding would change her mind.  She has decided somewhere along the line Christmas is her favorite holiday–I really have no idea why the change.  So I’m pretty sure saying no a 2nd time in a row will cut me out of the running to pet-sit.  I’ll miss it, because it was really good, easy money 😦

house-sitting 005

I guess that’s all for now–I need to rewrite my phonetic transcription tip-sheet so I can read it.

Interactive Audiology Presentation

2 Jul

I had another presentation today.  This one was for one group of high school students, and one group of (cue scary music:  dun, dun dun) middle school kids.  It was also shorter–like half the time we got last week.  And I knew I could do a YouTube video, but I think that’s kind of a cop-out, especially with younger students.

I knew I wanted to get the students out of their seats, but didn’t really know how to teach ear anatomy, noise-induced hearing loss, or assisted listening devices like that.  I thought about pictionary, but that’s really for review material–not novel teaching.  I asked my mom and she said she only knew of active stuff for review and quizzing.  When I pressed her, she said she could do like 8 activities for math, but not anatomy.  Still, I asked her to give me a sample.  The very first thing she talked about was using manipulatives.  And my advisor had talked about how they had used a funnel to show the function of the pinna before with great success.  That got me thinking. . .

 

general ear anatomy

My Mom (maybe both of us?) came up with putting “pieces of the ear” in a paper bag and having them kids pluck them out–you know for the gross-out factor of reaching into a bag not knowing what you’re going to get.  Then I came up with all the little objects I could use to show each portion of the ear:

funnel for the pinna/outer ear

drum for the tympanic membrane/ear drum

a hammer for the malleus often called the “hammer”

I used a door stop and taped the anvil coffee logo on both sides for the “anvil”/incus

I had a tiny shoe keychain for the stapes/”stirrup” to show the footplate’s action

I put a brush in a ziplock and filled it with water to have a visual for the fluid-filled cochlea containing hair cells

and finally, a sponge was the brain

education at family weekend health fair

I had the kids pick the items and stand in the front of the room with them, in the proper order.  I moved my arms (next time, I’ll have all the students at the desks wave their arms to involve everyone) to simulate the physical sound waves, then, I went through the function of each part of the anatomy:

My ear canal/funnel person stood there capturing the sound

The drum bagged to show sound hitting & vibrating it

Setting my 3 ossicles (w/interlinked arms) in motion (next time have them hum like a kazoo to show the ossicles vibrating).

My stapes person kicked the oval window on the bag

The inner ear person created gentle waves to stimulate the hair cells to send the sound info to the brain

And my brain/sponge was dipped in the water of the bag/cochlea to show the sound reaching its destination.

loudness vs intensity

Then, we did the whole thing again, but I jumped up and down exaggerated to show LOUD sound.  Everyone exaggerated their motions, the stapes footplate stomping the oval window to create a tsunami and flatten the hair cells.  And that time the sponge (a 2nd sponge) remained dry and unhearing.  It got everybody involved, laughing, and hopefully remembering the hearing process a little better.  And I have to say I was on my A-Game, and really extroverted (not my normal way) and funny and in charge of the scene.

That allowed me to segway to the FM loop where the kids played Simon Says, one in the hallway and one in front of the group doing silly things.

fm trainer

I had a lot of fun, and felt “in the zone” rather then shy and nervous, so it was great.  I could see myself doing little activities to promote prevention as an educational audiologist in my future.  It’s not the same as having to discipline a whole class for an entire day, which is what I didn’t think I’d like about that option.  Now, if I can only track down one of the many videos of the thing so I can put it in my portfolio!

Camp Na Ha Shnee (and my presentation)

28 Jun

I cut & pasted various different articles to give you a good idea of what the camp is about.  Even though it didn’t fall on an ideal day (my Dad’s 70th birthday when they were actually visiting) I rearranged things, because this population is close to my heart, and the mission of the camp important.  Three of us presented for Speech & Hearing Sciences.  We wanted to introduce some aspects of the career (SLP’s have a very diverse scope of practice with a lot of subsets) AND simultaneously give the teens good health info for themselves.  So we focused of voice (anti smoking, tobacco,  & drinking), ears (noise-induced hearing loss, ipods in particular), and the brain (TBI = don’t drink & drive, wear helmets).  I think it went really well, and most of the students were engaged and excited.  Here’s that camp info I told you about:

snake dance 3

The result of an earlier student leadership exercise to give the summer institute a native American-sounding name, Na-ha-shnee is an amalgamation of the words Native American High School Summer Nursing Institute. It has no literal translation in any tribal language. Na-ha-shnee encourages Native American youth to explore and pursue a career in the health sciences while providing learning experiences with native health care providers as teachers and role models.Indian 1

Fewer than 20 Native Americans across the United States have earned a PhD in nursing. One of them, Robbie Paul, Native American Health Sciences director at Washington State University (WSU) Spokane, is dedicated to increasing the number of Native Americans practicing health sciences in the Northwest.  Native Americans represent less than .5% of the health care workforce, and the Na-ha-shnee Native American Health Science Institute is taking steps to engage and expose Native American students to careers in nursing, medicine, exercise physiology, pharmacy, speech and hearing, and more.

The camp is part of a larger effort to solve the shortage of health care professionals in the Native American community, said Robbie Paul, director of the school’s Native American Health Sciences program and founder of the camp.  Paul, a beadworkNez Perce member who has a doctorate in Leadership Studies from Gonzaga, said the camp aims to build confidence in students who might deal with teachers who have low expectations of them.

For more than 17 years, Native American high school students representing various tribes from the Northwest have been given the chance to participate in Na-ha-shnee. Participants in the Na-ha-shnee Heath Sciences Institute represent the Spokane, Colville, Yakama, Snoqualmie, Puyallup, Lummi, Umatilla, Blackfoot-Cherokee, Shoshone-Paiute, Cherokee, Turtle Mountain Chippewa, Shoshone-Bannock, Tlingit, Chippewa Cree and Siletz tribes. They come from Washington and Oregon.  The program encourages youth to try out a career in the health sciences by providing hands-on learning experiences with Native American health care providers and health science and nursing students.Montana-Nikon 247

When the camp first began in 1995, its sole focus was on nursing. However, once students began expressing interest in learning about other career areas available in heath care, the camp expanded to respond to these interests. Now, Na-ha-shnee includes workshops on nursing, medicine, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, exercise physiology, speech and hearing, and brings Native American health care providers in to be teachers and role models for the students.  The camp has grown from six to 12 days and added math, English and leadership training. Students also practice writing tiny tots 5scholarship essays and interviewing with admissions counselors.

Na-ha-shnee is open to high school students who will be entering the 10th, 11th, and 12th grades in fall. The application process includes a written essay on why they want to come to camp and also explaining their interest in health care. Applicants must also have a minimum 2.5 GPA, have at least taken Algebra I, and have at least a C in their math and science classes.  Traditionally offered exclusively to Native dancer 4American high school students, the program was expanded last year to include students from disadvantaged backgrounds. The Na-ha-shnee program partnered with Creating a Nursing Path, a program consisting of 27 high school students. Funded by a workforce diversity grant, Creating a Nursing Path is led by Janet Katz, PhD, RN, associate professor from WSU College of Nursing in Spokane. The purpose of this program is to address the need to graduate baccalaureate-prepared nurses from disadvantaged backgrounds

In its 19th year, the camp has participants from 13 tribes, some from as far away as Arizona’s Navajo Nation. Attendance has grown through recruitment visits to tribal and urban schools, word-of-mouth and the Internet, Paul said.  Of the more than 340 campers over the years, Paul estimates about 70 percent of them have gone on IMG_3847to college.

Paul presented the purpose of the camp as threefold: academic, leadership and cultural. For the latter, Paul uses stories to teach the students life lessons embedded in their tribal heritage.  Paul said that the experience is both an academic and social one for those in attendance. In addition to taking English, science, and leadership classes, students get to experience different aspects of college life such as living on campus, dorm life, and having a roommate.

OK, Go!

28 May

I’ve been dallying, because I am intimidated by the personal statement.  But I need to just get something down, and stop all the internet scouring, as it’s just taking time.  I’m not sure it’s all that helpful.  So in the interest of making $hit happen, here goes try #1:

UNC AuD app checklist

Format:

intro–talk about shopping w/dad and how that inspires my interest in the career

–in 1st paragraph tie in my internal personality traits that work well with audiology

Body–very briefly mention pre-vet, but generate substantial list of vet traits that relate directly to audiology

3rd paragraph/conclusion(?)–further show it’s AuD I want (not vet) by talking about hearing screenings, classes, media that inspires/educates me and how it directly relates to the specific type & population I want to work with.

Audiogram-Familiar-Sounds

OK, quick and dirty for content purposes–can be fleshed out and corrected later.  The 1st Draft isn’t SUPPOSED to be perfect (that was a note to myself)!

Intro:

As a child it was always special bonding time for my father and I to go grocery shopping.  It was a time-consuming affair, but we liked to be together.  The shopping itself, was tedious and boring, but I love my dad and liked to laugh with him.  One damper on the process was checking out.  My dad could not hear his total.  It made me feel awkward and I did not like how people in line behind us became impatient.  Those people should see my dad as I did–funny, compassionate, warm, loyal, hard-working.  Instead they saw him as an impediment to leaving the store–a burden, an annoyance.  I hated to see the cashier become flustered or impatient.  Why couldn’t everyone realize my dad had the hearing loss because he is a hero?  He got this embarrassing condition fighting for our country in Vietnam.  But I felt ashamed, because I also felt annoyed and embarrassed when the check out process was slowed by my father’s disability.

It made me ashamed, because I consider myself a compassionate person.  That is the whole reason I leaned toward being a veterinarian for so long–I wanted to help the helpless.

Today, I am inspired to help people like my dad function like the heros they are.  I want to not only help hearing aids be available to patients, but make the human side, the rehabilitation, instruction for use, and communication skills to be available.

[note to self:  stop trying to make it sound perfect and be perfectly organized, and just think basic content–you can fix this stuff later, you’re getting stuck!]

Traits that I embody are organizational skills, dedication, and determination.  They are perfect for the field of audiology.  Organization is necessary to assess the patient and figure out appropriate diagnostic procedures by looking at every aspect of the problem, the case history, and the anatomy.  Dedication comes in handy when you commit to a patient’s progress and quality of life over time.  Audiologists are not finished after the diagnostic and fitting portions.  They have to follow through and make certain that the person they are working with are functional, confident, and meeting their own goals.  Determination is a skill an audiologist needs to work with a variety of people, with differing needs.  Audiologists have to tailor care to the deficits of each person, and determination to seek the correct diagnosis, find outside the box solutions and, persist in trying until it’s right is pertinent.

Because I have those traits, feeling embarrassed to be seen with my struggling father made me ashamed.  I could have such compassion, and I was letting my own emotions get in the way of that when it came to one of the most important people in my life.  It was my compassion that had led me into being a pre-vet student.  And though that career did not work out for me, the skills I gained while chasing is translate directly and nicely to audiology.

Nonverbal communication skills, essential for ascertaining animal temperaments with the twin goals in mine of keeping human and animal uninjured, and efficiently accomplishing the task at hand is directly related to audiology.  When hearing loss makes verbal communication difficult, reading postural, ocular, and other signs becomes helpful.

The detail-oriented nature that veterinary practice demands, is also necessary for audiology.  Looking at the entire patient, running the best diagnostic tests, following through with best amplification, and making sure the patient is receiving benefit from your work, is a lot of small details.  It requires meticulousness and thoroughness.

[generate a bigger list of traits used for both vet & AuD]

The desire to work in audiology was sparked by my intent to help people like my dad.  The necessary skills were honed in a different health field.  Once I got my foot in the door to the speech and hearing sciences, the knowledge of the profession followed.  Learning about anatomy and physiology gave me a good foundation for normal.  The speech and hearing sciences tied the chemistry and physics I had already taken together with the auditory and communication systems.  Learning about pathologies and amplification was interesting.  I really enjoyed the rehabilitation tactics and audiometric evaluations.  And I was able to practice them through performing hearing screenings through my school.  I liked putting the theories I had learned in the classroom to practical use on real people.

These specific examples of things we did, showed me I would like to work with the spectrum of ages in this specific field of audiology.  And of course, remembering my dad, I will emphasize aural rehabilitation and follow up with each of my future patients.

health fair 2014

All right, that wasn’t so bad.  I’ll publish this then generate some lists to make it better!

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Why Class Group-Work Does Not Teach Teamwork

25 May

Here’s another old draft I stumbled upon.  I do dislike teamwork when my grade is on the line.  I want to earn my OWN grades.  It shouldn’t be influenced by the work ethic of other people.  And it should be left to chance–what group members you get.  Also, I shouldn’t have to do every aspect of a big project in order to get a good grade out of it.

I HATE group work!

jumbo turtleNo one ever asks me to join their group, so it’s always awkward to get into a group in the first place.  I only want to do my own work (which is of outstanding caliber *truth, not bragging*) not be humiliated when no one wants to include me in their team.  Then, IF I do find a group everyone in the group knows each other and wanted to work together except me, so that’s more awkwardness.

And, in class–who do you sit by?  Friends.  People sit by friends, or they end up getting to be friends because of location.  People that sit in front are older students or sight-impaired, or very studious, generally.  While those in the back are too cool for school and want to text and chatter during class.  So you get partnered up with like people anyway.

An example of a group project gone awry–not my fault:

MY group sat in a row.  The fifth girl in the row, was the writer, I was the first on the opposite side of the row.  And the Green Bluff 2 025three gals in between talked about their “juicing” diets.  The writer organized our paper by name (douchi) instead of just writing a half page and putting everyone’s name at the top.  Though I had written an answer for EVERY theory (when we were only supposed to address one) this writer wrote a literal sentience for my name.  She wrote a paragraph under each of her friends though they had contributed ZERO because of the juice diet discussion.  And under her own name, the writer wrote a half page.  Bitch.  So it was made to look like I was a slacker.

My worst group project ever–also not my fault:

My Farm Plan

pretty in pinkMy senior year at Mizzou everyone had to take a capstone course in their major.  Hog Production is what fit into my schedule–though I didn’t intend on working with hogs and had no strong interest in them.  Anyway, our semester project was to write this big, involved farm plan and present it.  All in a group of 4.  The big thing was that the plan had to utilize everything we learned in class AND be consistent   Meaning all 4 group members had to have the same set-up.  Before Thanksgiving break I e-mailed my group and told them I would be happy to edit their portions, as well as type them all in one document–as a pre-vet student I needed an A in every class, and this project was the biggest component of our grade.

None of my three group members had STARTED the semester-long farm plan at that point in late November!!!!  By turkeyNovember–with only a month left of class.  Hadn’t.  Even.  Started.  Now, what am I supposed to do about that?  So I wrote the prof. explaining the situation and asking what I should do.  He just assured me in all his years of doing this project the groups have always come together by the end.

So no help.

And sure enough, come grading time my (assigned) group members with senioritis and plans to work for their family farms in a week or so (ie not pre-vet and not concerned about one course grade) had not completed the farm plans, and the ones that had slapped it together.  So even though MY portion was worthy of an A (the prof even said that), as a group we got a C-!  When I complained to the prof I should not be graded based on other people’s caliber of work–he just said he had always graded them as groups for the 20-some years he had been doing this, and he had never before seen a group that didn’t come together as mine hadn’t. . .  I got a C in that class 😦  NOT fair.

So that’s a huge reason why I’m anti-group work.  And here’s a bad dream I had related to group work:

To dream that you are in a bus accident suggests that it is time for you to move away from a group setting and venture out on your own. You need to be more independent.

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Goose Song

8 May

Cool and I are always talking to, and especially singing to our cats.  I’ve told you about our language of dropped liquids (/l/ & /r//) and how sometimes our MeowEEZE sneaks out of our apartment into our conversations with real people.  And how we don’t really care about being crazy cat ladys.  There are worse things.

Sloppy's electric throw 1

Sloppy-Joe Cool’s song (she had many, but her name-sake song) was to the tune of Beethoven’s 5th:

Sloppy Joe Cool

Sloppy Joe Cool

Sloppy Joe Cool Sloppy Joe Cool Sloppy Joe Cool

Kitty!

 

Choco-Luv’s song also features her name prominently:

Choco-Luv Choco-Luv Choco-Luv Choco-Luv

Choco-Luv Choco-Luv Choco-Luvups

Hay Hay Hay!

 

But I think Goose’s song is a real master-piece.  We are constantly calling this kitty different names, depending on what he’s doing at the time–he’s often doing funny or ornery things so in accordance his song goes:

Goose 2012He’s a goose

He’s a man

He’s a coon

He’s a Cat

He’s a turkey, he’s a lion, he’s a mongoose

He’s a big cat

He’s a fat cat

but he’s a real good buddy

+/- (‘cept when he’s not)

 

I just wanted to share how fun our lives are because of our beloved pets.  In other news, I got my Audiometry final exam grade back today.  I got 98%!!!!!!!!  So my final course grade is a 97.4% A+.  I am so proud of that because I really buckled down and worked so hard for it.  Throughout the semester, but BIG-time at the end.  I’m especially happy about it because I was afraid after losing so many points on exam 3, intimidated by the test format/grading/demeanor of the instructor, and worried about losing my overall grade and all-important GPA.  And despite the pressure, I stepped up and pulled it out.

I want to make clear that the course content was not as conceptually challenging as many classes, though there was a lot of things to cover.  Classes that have been more difficult:  Math of any type, physics, biochem, chem lab, chemistry, nutrition, animal physiology, anatomy, genetics, and speech & hearing sciences to name the most notorious in my memory.  All the same, because of the instructor, it’s been one of my most hard-fought A’s I’ve ever ever gotten (behind Physics 2 b/c math used to be my nemesis and Biochem b/c it was conceptually challenging, had TONS of material, and involved a lot of rote memorization of vocab/cycles/structures).

Even though I don’t have (much of) a job, I think I’m going to treat myself with a new pair of boots.  Boots because they go on clearance in the spring when stores are trying to clear the large inventory and they are something I can use this winter and especially in Colorado.  Now, it’s time to celebrate!

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pet-peeve college loan advice

19 Apr

is ALWAYS geared to. . . Parents. It highly annoys me.  Who are these kids with rich Mommies and Daddies paying their Tiger Walkwhole tuition bills (and whatever else)?  That’s not MY life.  And I don’t have the rich husband paying my way either.  Address tuition information/tips to students.  I think it’s ridiculous to assume students aren’t paying their own educational expenses. Maybe that’s why it’s so much more expensive then I can afford?

I’m thinking about this because April is supposed to be money-blog-month.  But also because I had to jump through a moneybunch of hoops to complete my FAFSA supplemental paperwork.  Which is admittedly better since I turned 25 and don’t have to hassle my parents for their (*required*) personal financial info that only ends up hurting my chances for the loans.  Which isn’t fair or right at all since they don’t pay my tuition/rent/car/bills, so I shouldn’t have to use their tax info.  But it’s still a pain, and I think they purposely hire the most inept people possible to work college financial aid.  I had to re-submit 2 packets of paperwork because they obviously didn’t OPEN it, to see the necessary documents were all there.

And I was also thinking about college tuition because another one of my undergrad loans is coming off of forbearance–which super-sucks.  And I’ve been procrastinating BIG-time about calling and seeing if there’s some option.  ANY option black_dragonfishto put it back on forbearance or reduce payments at the very least.  I’m putting it off for many reasons:  I hate the phone.  Really.  I hardly use mine at all, and literally only use it for emergencies, and when I have to make these types of outgoing calls.  I’m also putting off the call because of long holds, having to repeat info over and over, the horrible tone of the operators (they act annoyed you’re bothering them and treat you like a loser), and the thought that nothing can be done anyway.  I’ll make the call, but maybe Tuesday. . .

Here’s an interesting article about college costs, which is bleak, but I think true to life:

This is interesting. A credit hour in 1979 at MSU was 24.50, adjusted for inflation that is 79.23 in today dollars. One credit hour today costs 428.75.

found that the average student in 1979 could work 182 hours (a part-time summer job) to pay for a year’s tuition. In 2013, it took 991 hours (a full-time job for half the year) to accomplish the same.

Is it any surprise that so many students today are suckered into taking out non-dischargeable loans, in growing chunks, to pay for their bachelor’s degrees? More than two-thirds of recent graduates are carrying debt—and some of them will be paying it off for decades to come. Studying computer science at Harvey Mudd may be worth it; majoring in art at Murray State probably isn’t.

http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2014/04/the-myth-of-working-your-way-through-college/359735/

Speaking of pet-peeves, WordPress changed the settings so when you publish something that had been in your drafts–it is put on the date that you FIRST made it a draft, not the day you actually hit “publish.”  It’s no good, because that effectively buries new posts, put it on an old calender month instead of showing a current post, and seems sneaky.  So now I have to cut & paste all my draft posts into a new folder in order for it to go on the top of my list for the current day?!

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